Visiting Scholars on campus (and at the Environmental Design Library)

  

Summer brings many visitors from near and far to UC Berkeley, especially the libraries. This week, 24 future Cal students — third graders from Oakland’s Northern Light School, accompanied by Ricardo Huerta Niño (M.C.P. ‘09, PhD City & Regional Planning ‘13) — spent the day on campus visiting the Campanile, the campus’s own T-Rex and Haas Pavilion (Go Bears!).

But the highlight of their day must surely have been their visit to the Environmental Design Library where librarian David Eifler introduced them to his collection of pop-up and artists’ books,  gave the young scholars an opportunity to select items from the collection and showed off the library’s sculptural furniture.

 


Lester Telser: Beyond Conventions in Economics

Photo of Lester Telser
Photograph by Leena Schwartz, 2016

Now online, An Oral History with Lester Telser: Beyond Conventions in Economics

Lester Telser is Professor of Economics Emeritus at the University of Chicago. A student at Chicago in the 1950s, Dr. Telser was first a professor in the Graduate School of Business until 1964. Dr. Telser’s life work is the theory of the core, a variant of game theory that involves coalitions of agents as opposed to individuals working to maximize their advantage. He used sophisticated mathematics to study why and how certain forms of markets are organized without appeals to more established concepts in economics. As both a student and colleague at the Chicago economics department, and as a fellow at both the Cowles Commission and the Cowles Foundation, Telser is a key witness to the transformation of the field of economics after World War II.

Economist Life Stories

The impact of economics in our society is hard to overstate. Economics structures government policy, guides decision-making in firms both small and large, and indirectly shapes the larger political discourses in our society.

To enrich the understanding of the influence and sources of powerful economic ideas, the Becker Friedman Institute for Research in Economics at the University of Chicago set out in 2015 to capture oral histories of selected economists associated with Chicago economics. The aim was to preserve the experiences, views, and voices of influential economists and to document the historical origins of important economic ideas for the benefit of researchers, educators, and the broader public. This oral history with Lester Telser, conducted in ten sessions in Chicago, IL, from July to October 2017, is the third interview for the project.

Economist Life Stories is more than a collection of life histories; it chronicles the history of a scholarly community and institutions at the University of Chicago, such as the Graduate School of Business, the Cowles Commission, and the Department of Economics. It also reflects the achievements of faculty and students in the domains of economic policymaking and private enterprise around the world. Although this project focuses on the leaders and students of the University of Chicago Department of Economics, the Graduate School of Business, and the Law School, we hope to add more stories from economists around the world as the project expands.

Acknowledgments

Hodson Thornber and Paul Burnett organized the project with Toni Shears and Amy Boonstra of the Becker Friedman Institute, with important support from an advisory group of historians and economists.

Financial support for this work was provided by Hodson Thornber, a member of the Becker Friedman Institute Council, whose contribution is gratefully acknowledged.


New Publication By Professor Julia Bryan-Wilson: Trevor Paglen at the Limit

Be sure to read Professor Julia Bryan-Wilson’s survey essay, Trevor Paglen at the Limit,  in the new monograph, Trevor Paglen by Phaidon press.

Trevor Paglen by Phaidon Press

“Julia Bryan Wilson, in her Survey text, offers a chronological analysis of Paglen’s oeuvre, using geometric terms such as ‘voids’ and ‘lines’ as entry points into the work and to highlight both the multi-dimensionality and formal rigour of Paglen’s practice. ”

“Trevor Paglen’s art gives visual geography to hidden forces, relentlessly pursuing what he calls the ‘unseeable and undocumentable’ in contemporary society. Blending photography, installation, investigative journalism, and science, Paglen explores the clandestine activity of government and intelligence agencies, using high-grade equipment to document their movements and reveal their hidden inner workings. This book presents over three decades of Paglen’s groundbreaking work, making visible the structures and technologies that impact our lives.” -Phaidon


J. Michael Bishop: Scientist, UCSF Chancellor, and Nobel Laureate

J. Michael Bishop with a model of DNA Photograph courtesy of UCSF Archives and Special Collections.
J. Michael Bishop with a model of DNA Photograph courtesy of UCSF Archives and Special Collections

This oral history with J. Michael Bishop is one in a series documenting bioscience and biotechnology in Northern California. Selecting Rous sarcoma virus, a cancer-causing retrovirus, after arriving at UCSF in 1968, Bishop was soon joined by Harold E. Varmus with whom he established a partnership legendary for its length and productivity. In a seminal publication of 1976, they established the proto-oncogene as a normal cell component and precursor of oncogenes. In 1989, Bishop and Varmus were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for this research. With some reluctance, Bishop agreed to become UCSF Chancellor in 1998. His highly productive eleven years saw the creation and staffing of the Mission Bay campus and record-breaking fundraising success, among other important events he oversaw. The oral history consists of five interviews conducted in 2016 and 2017, with an introduction by colleagues Bruce Alberts and Harold Varmus.

 


Springing Forward: An End-of-Semester Update from the Office of Scholarly Communication Services

Photo of students going up and down stairs
Photo by Loïc Fürhoff on Unsplash

Happy May, everyone! Now that the spring semester has drawn to a close, we wanted to take a moment to reflect on the past few months and look ahead to the summer and fall. It’s been a busy time for the Office of Scholarly Communication Services. Here are some highlights.

Maria Gould (that’s me!) joined the Office of Scholarly Communication Services in January as the new Scholarly Communication and Copyright Librarian. Hello, all!

We launched openbooks.berkeley.edu, an exciting new platform – and the first of its kind in the US – to provide self-publishing services to the entire UC Berkeley campus for creation of online textbooks and other digital projects.

We released the Pathways to OA toolkit in collaboration with fellow UC libraries to analyze approaches and strategies toward achieving a large-scale transition to a more open and sustainable scholarly publishing system. To enable other institutions to make similar decisions responsive to their own needs, we’re chairing a working forum on the Berkeley campus in October to collaborate with North American libraries in transforming the scholarly publishing system.

We wrapped up the second semester of a multifaceted pilot program to make textbooks and other course materials more affordable for students. Stay tuned for our forthcoming report detailing the extensive student savings to date! We are pleased to announce that we’ll be running these services again in Fall 2018. If you’d like to save students money and develop innovative pedagogy, please complete this form to participate.

We funded dozens of Open Access publications by UC Berkeley authors through our BRII program.

We put on a scholarly publishing symposium for graduate students, and we offered numerous workshops and consultations for groups all around campus on a wide range of topics, including copyright and fair use, text and data mining, scientific publishingopen access, and more.

Over the summer and heading into the fall, we’ll be continuing to deepen and further develop our service offerings for campus in the areas of copyright guidance, publishing support, and course content affordability, among others.

Thank you for your engagement and support this semester! Please let us know how else we can serve you, and stay tuned for more to come throughout the year.  


Summer reading: Daytripper

Daytripper book cover

Daytripper
Gabriel Ba and Fabio Moon

This graphic novel details the many ways in which the protagonist dies. Each chapter ends with his death and the next chapter begins at a different point in his life and ends in his death. The ultimate result is a moving and powerful examination of what it means to live each day to the fullest, and how to find hope, love, and passion in both the best and worst of circumstances.

This book is part of the 2017 Berkeley Summer Reading List. Stay tuned for more weekly posts!


Public Health Library merges with Bioscience & Natural Resources Library

Bioscience Library
The collections of the Public Health Library will be moved to the Biosciences, Natural Resources & Public Health Library in the Valley Life Sciences Building, shown above. (Photo by J. Pierre Carrillo for the UC Berkeley Library)

On June 4, two important libraries in the Life & Health Sciences Division will come together under one roof as the Marian Koshland Bioscience, Natural Resources & Public Health Library. The Sheldon Margen Public Health Library — located in 1 University Hall, at Oxford Street and University Avenue — will close June 1.

For more details, read the story at Library News.

 


New Publication by Assistant Professor Anneka Lenssen: Modern Art in the Arab World: Primary Documents

History of Art department Assistant Professor Anneka Lenssen has published Modern Art in the Arab World: Primary Documents with co-editors Sarah Rodgers and Nada Shabout.

See Professor Lenssen speak about her new book at NY MoMA on May 23, 6:00-8:00. In conversation with Anneka Lenssen, Sarah Rogers, Nada Shabout, co-editors of the book, and Iftikhar Dadi, Cornell University, with introduction by Glenn D. Lowry, MoMA.

 

anneka

 

From the publisher website, Duke University Press:

“Modern Art in the Arab World: Primary Documents offers an unprecedented resource for the study of modernism: a compendium of critical art writings by twentieth-century Arab intellectuals and artists. The selection of texts—many of which appear here for the first time in English—includes manifestos, essays, transcripts of roundtable discussions, diary entries, exhibition guest-book comments, letters, and more. Traversing empires and nation-states, diasporas and speculative cultural and political federations, these documents bring light to the formation of a global modernism, through debates on originality, public space, spiritualism and art, postcolonial exhibition politics, and Arab nationalism, among many other topics. The collection is framed chronologically, and includes contextualizing commentaries to assist readers in navigating its broad geographic and historical scope. Interspersed throughout the volume are sixteen contemporary essays: writings by scholars on key terms and events as well as personal reflections by modern artists who were themselves active in the histories under consideration. A newly commissioned essay by historian and Arab-studies scholar Ussama Makdisi provides a historical overview of the region’s intertwined political and cultural developments during the twentieth century. Modern Art in the Arab World is an essential addition to the investigation of modernism and its global manifestations.”