New book by Daylet Domínguez in the Spanish & Portuguese Department

book cover

Daylet Domínguez is an Associate Professor of Caribbean and Latin American literatures and cultures in  UC Berkeley’s Department of Spanish & Portuguese. Her new book, Ficciones etnográficas: literatura ciencias sociales y proyectos nacionales en el Caribe hispano del siglo XIX (Iberoamericana Vervuert, 2021), deals with the importance of literature for the constitution of the social sciences as a modern practice and discourse in the Hispanic Caribbean. She proposes that anthropology and its related subjects began to build a place of enunciation at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century, in close relationship with travel literature, the “cuadro de costumbres,” and the novel. It is at the intersection with these literary genres that the emerging disciplines shaped a large part of their tropology and discursive genealogy; although, once institutionalized, they disavowed its epistemological validity. In the process of textual and institutional differentiation, the social sciences became one of the most effective ways to consolidate national projects, organize the transition to modern citizenships and undermine the postulates of racial and climatic degeneration associated with the region.

[translated from publisher’s site]

 


Celebrating Latinx Heritage Month with Arte Público Press

From its beginnings on the artistic fringe during the Hispanic Civil Rights Movement to its current status as the oldest and most accomplished publisher of contemporary and recovered literature by US Hispanic authors, Arte Público Press and its imprint, Piñata Books, have become a showcase for Hispanic literary creativity, arts and culture.

The original publishers of Sandra Cisneros’ seminal The House on Mango Street, Arte Público’s other well-known authors include Obie-award-winning playwright and filmmaker Luis Valdez, playwright Miguel Piñero and best-selling authors Nicholasa Mohr, Victor Villaseñor, and Helena María Viramontes. As part of the ongoing efforts to bring Hispanic literature to mainstream audiences, Arte Público Press launched the Recovering the US Hispanic Literary Heritage Program in 1992. This program represents the first nationally coordinated attempt to recover, index and publish lost Latino writings that date from the American colonial period through 1960. [from the publisher’s web site].

From children’s books and contemporary fiction to critical social history, the UC Berkeley Library is proud to hold most of Arte Púbico Press’ bilingual catalog of publications in the Main (Gardner) Stacks, the Ethnic Studies Library, and The Bancroft Library. In recent years, the Library has also acquired many of its publications in digital form through Digitalia Hispánica, Latino Literature, and other ebook platforms such as OverDrive. These can be discovered in UC Library Search with keyword phrase “arte publico press” and limiting to online through UC Berkeley.


Literature Picks for Hispanic Heritage Month

From September 15  to October 15, we’re celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month! At the Library, you can browse our Latino Literature digital collection, which features thousands of digitized, full-text novels, poems, and plays written by over 400 authors in English and Spanish, or you can explore some of the titles below.

If you’re looking for novels, try these:

Maybe poetry is more your thing:

Don’t forget to check out these eye-opening memoirs:

 

What’s your favorite Latinx read? Tell us on Twitter! @doe_lit



Distinguished Alumni Lecture: Oral Narratives and Black Lives in Francophone Studies

 

poster for French Department Alumni Lecture
Poster by Alan Yeh

Oral Narratives and Black Lives in Francophone Studies

Senegalese in the Diaspora: What Sociolinguistic Interviews Can Tell Us about Language, Race, Mobility, and Belonging
Maya Smith, University of Washington

Drawing on extensive interviews with people of Senegalese heritage in Paris, Rome, and New York City, this talk explores the fascinating role of language in national, transnational, postcolonial, racial, and migrant identities. Senegalese in the diaspora are notable in their capacity for movement and in their multifaceted approach to discourse, shaping their identity as they purposefully switch between languages. Through a mix of poignant, funny, reflexive, introspective, and witty stories, interviewees blur the lines between the utility and pleasure of language, allowing a more nuanced understanding of why and how Senegalese move.

“Un désordre indescriptible”: Folklore as Mask in the Congolese Nervous State
Jonathon Repinecz, George Mason University

This paper is part of a larger project about how colonial explorers, missionaries, and magistrates in what is now the Democratic Republic of Congo used strategies of “folklorization”—that is, the framing of oral traditional materials as quaint, rural, and authentic—as propaganda in the service of popularizing the colony and obscuring the everyday violence of the colonial state. It will focus on the archives of Léon Guébels, a prosecutor and judge who published many folklore collections under a pseudonym, contain manuscripts written by Congolese schoolchildren in both French and African languages, sent to him by their teachers, which he overwrites in large red letters with appreciations such as “IDIOTIC,” “NOT WITTY ENOUGH,” or “CLEARLY THE INVENTION OF A SILLY CHRISTIAN GIRL.” I will examine some of the reasons he finds these tales inconvenient, framing my findings in the context of colonial racial anxieties over subversive ideologies, urbanization, “detribalization,” and open rebellion.

Thursday, September 23 • 4-6pm
French Department Library (4229 Dwinelle)
https://french.berkeley.edu


Workshop: Publish Digital Books & Open Educational Resources with Pressbooks

Publish Digital Books & Open Educational Resources with Pressbooks
Tuesday, September 14th, 11:10am-2:30pm
Online: Register to receive the Zoom link
Tim Vollmer and Stacy Reardon

If you’re looking to self-publish work of any length and want an easy-to-use tool that offers a high degree of customization, allows flexibility with publishing formats (EPUB, PDF), and provides web-hosting options, Pressbooks may be great for you. Pressbooks is often the tool of choice for academics creating digital books, open textbooks, and open educational resources, since you can license your materials for reuse however you desire. Learn why and how to use Pressbooks for publishing your original books or course materials. You’ll leave the workshop with a project already under way! Register here.

Upcoming Workshops in this Series – Fall 2021:

  • Creating Web Maps with ArcGIS Online
  • Web Platforms for Digital Projects
  • The Long Haul: Best Practices for Making Your Digital Project Last
  • Copyright and Fair Use for Digital Projects

Please see bit.ly/dp-berk for details.


Literary Research: How to Do Research in Literature (and Be Awesome)

How to Do Research in Literature (and Be Awesome)
Monday, September 20, 2021
1:10pm – 2:30pm
Online: Register to receive the Zoom link

We love books! But how do you research authors, novels, literary periods, and more? Attend this online workshop with Stacy Reardon, the Librarian for literature, to learn how to research in literary studies whether on campus or at home. We’ll focus especially on getting the most out of the Library’s new search tool, UC Library Search. You’ll leave the workshop knowing the fundamentals of literary research to help you craft informed class assignments or just indulge your inner lit nerd!

This workshop is designed especially for UC Berkeley undergraduate literature students of all levels.

Register here.


Romance Language Collections Newsletter no.6 (Fall 2021)

It has been a challenging year and we look forward to most of you returning to campus where you can take advantage of all the resources the Library has to offer. By August 25, most of UC Berkeley’s libraries will have reopened. This year’s welcome back newsletter for those working in the Romance languages focuses on both digital and print resources. For the most up-to-date information on the UC Berkeley Library’s services, please continue to check the Library services and resources during COVID-19 page.

book sculpture
Photo: Centre Cultural La Nau – Universitat de València by Claude Potts, CC BY-NC-SA 4.0
What’s new in the Library for Fall 2021?

  • UC Library Search
  • bCourses
  • Reference & Instruction
  • New Books and More
  • Library Research Guides
  • Print Books
  • eBooks
  • Databases
  • Library Workshops
  • Featured Digitized Work

See also:


Picks for Disability Pride Month

July is Disability Pride Month, a celebration of the strength and diversity of people with disabilities. Check out these picks of memoirs, fiction, and essays written by disabled writers .

Interested in memoirs? Don’t miss these:

Check out these novels featuring main characters with disabilities:

If you’re interested in essays and nonfiction works, try these:



Summer reading: The Fifth Season

Book cover for The Fifth SeasonThe Fifth Season
N.K. Jemisin

In this first book of the Broken Earth trilogy, the world—which may be ours, or may be a different one—is in a constant state of tectonic upheaval. Cataclysmic earthquakes and volcanic eruptions are so regular that humanity has come to expect regular apocalypses, and plans accordingly. Stability, such as it is, is maintained by orogenes—people with the ability to manipulate the earth, who are reviled, feared, and enslaved for their powers. How everything got this way, and what it will cost to change it, is the subject of this incredible trilogy.

N.K. Jemisin shows us what is possible when the culture of speculative fiction breaks its self-defeating habit of focusing on stories written by, about, and for heterosexual white men. Suddenly, the genre is free to do what it is best at: questioning the assumptions with which we build our daily lives, and showing us what we can do to change them.

JESSE LOESBERG
Web Designer
University Library

This book is part of the 2021 Berkeley Summer Reading List. Read this book on Overdrive. Stay tuned for more weekly posts!


Read at Home: New in OverDrive for July

OverDrive is a UC Berkeley Library service for borrowing ebooks and audiobooks. You can access books online, download them to a device, or read them on an ereader such as Kindle. OverDrive is available to current UC Berkeley students, faculty, and staff. How it works: Simply log in with your CalNet ID, and you can start borrowing!

You can also download the Libby by OverDrive app to access OverDrive from your mobile device. For more information, visit the OverDrive help guide.

Check out some of July’s new arrivals here: