Select new books from Cuba!

Despite the historic visit of President Obama to Cuba and subsequent gestures to open the trade and communications, acquiring the Cuban books remains a formidable task. We continue to purchase available relevant academic level Cuban books to meet the current research needs of our users. The album below contains a relatively small batch of Cuban book. Please click on the icon below to access the rest of the album. If you have any specific requests about any other Latin American Studies related materials please feel free to contact me by email.

Obama y el "nuevo enfoque" hacia Cuba Author: Elier Ramírez Cañedo Publisher: La Habana : Casa Editorial Verde Olivo, 2019. ©2017


November 12: ¡Las Sandinistas! Screening at Moffitt Library!

¡Las Sandinistas! reveals the untold stories of Nicaraguan women warriors and social revolutionaries who shattered barriers during Nicaragua’s 1979 Sandinista Revolution and the ensuing U.S.-backed Contra War. Today, as the current Sandinista government is erasing these women’s stories of heroism, social reform, and military accomplishments from history books, these same women are fighting to reclaim history – and are once again leading inspiring popular movements for equality and democracy. 96 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles.

“A documentary of ripe impact and value… with its rich archival footage, and its nuts-and-bolts view of a revolution that was every bit as seismic as the one in Cuba, it’s instructive to see how the rebellion against an autocracy gets built: gun by gun, body by body, skirmish by skirmish.” – Variety

All Cine Latino screenings are free to the public. No registration or tickets are required. Please check clas.berkeley.edu to confirm time and location

Tuesday, November 12, 7:00 pm
NEW LOCATION: 106 Moffitt Library

Sponsored by CLAS!


Today: Film director Francisco Cruces at CLAS

Center for Latin American Studies
University of California, Berkeley

Today

 

Film Screening and Live Q&A
The Order I Live In: An Indoor Urban Symphony
With Co-Director Francisco Cruces

Cities have been narrated from manifold perspectives, but rarely from the inside. This ethnographic documentary on contemporary urban life highlights the voices of 20 people in Madrid, Mexico City, and Montevideo. Through narrative, stories, and objects, the “city” is no longer an anonymous locus of commodities, industry, and mass human relations, but rather a space for personal assertion and self-discovery, as well as the continuities and ruptures of modern living. 63 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles.

After the screening, co-director Francisco Cruces will take part in a live Q&A. He is Professor of Anthropology at Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia in Spain, and a Visiting Scholar at UC Berkeley.

Monday, November 4, 4:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Next week: Dams and Brazil

Itaipu Dam in Brazil. (Photo courtesy of Duke University Press.)

Jacob Blanc
Before the Flood: The Itaipu Dam and the Visibility of Rural Brazil

A Conversation with the Author

In the 1970s and 1980s, Brazilian communities facing displacement by the Itaipu Dam — which is now largest producer of hydroelectric power in the world — stood up against the military officials overseeing the dam’s construction. In the context of an emerging national fight for democracy, they elevated their struggle for land into a referendum on the dictatorship itself. Jacob Blanc will discuss his new book, which traces the protest movements of Brazilians living in the shadow of the Itaipu dam, challenges the primacy of urban-focused narratives, and unearths the rural experiences of dictatorship and democracy in Brazil.

Jacob Blanc is a Lecturer in Latin American History at the University of Edinburgh. His new book, Before the Flood: The Itaipu Dam and the Visibility of Rural Brazil will be published by Duke University Press in December 2019.

Tuesday, November 12, 4:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

New screening

(Image from ¡Las Sandinistas!)
Cine Latino
¡Las Sandinistas!
Directed by Jenny Murray (United States, 2018)

Trailer for the film

 

¡Las Sandinistas! reveals the untold stories of Nicaraguan women warriors and social revolutionaries who shattered barriers during Nicaragua’s 1979 Sandinista Revolution and the ensuing U.S.-backed Contra War. Today, as the current Sandinista government is erasing these women’s stories of heroism, social reform, and military accomplishments from history books, these same women are fighting to reclaim history – and are once again leading inspiring popular movements for equality and democracy. 96 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles.

“A documentary of ripe impact and value… with its rich archival footage, and its nuts-and-bolts view of a revolution that was every bit as seismic as the one in Cuba, it’s instructive to see how the rebellion against an autocracy gets built: gun by gun, body by body, skirmish by skirmish.” – Variety

All Cine Latino screenings are free to the public. No registration or tickets are required. Please check clas.berkeley.edu to confirm time and location

Tuesday, November 12, 7:00 pm
NEW LOCATION: 106 Moffitt Library


Book talk (en français) with Lyonel Trouillot

Wednesday, November 13
5-6:30 pm
4229 Dwinelle (French Department Library)

Lyonel Trouillot is a novelist, poet, journalist, and professor of French and Creole literature in Port-au-Prince. He will discuss his novel Kannjawou (Actes Sud, 2016) which was recently translated into English (Schaffner Press, 2019). He will be introduced by Soraya Tlatli, a professor of French at UC Berkeley.

Sponsored by UC Berkeley’s Department of French & Cultural Services, French Embassy in the U.S.


New Cartonera Books from Mexico at Doe Library.

Cartonera books collection at UC Berkeley’s Doe Library continues to grow since our initial humble beginnings two years ago. Since them, we have acquired over 250 Cartonera books from the different parts of Latin America.  Cartonera is a term used to describe books that have their cover made from cardboard boxes. Usually, these are painted or illustrated. These can be searched in our library’s Oskicat using the following keyword search:

Latin American cartonera collection.

Today, I present you with select photos of our newly purchased Cartonera books from Mexico. This batch is interesting because it contains various items linked to the events of 1968. The cartonera books revolve around some themes as what was read during 1968 events, what fashion was trendy during the year, etc. Besides, these books we did purchase the first 12 issues of Puff. Puff is a magazine in Cartonera format.

Below, I present you an album with the images of the new Cartonera items from Mexico. Please click on the icon to access the whole album. The title below is 1968 Testimonios by Cascarón Artesanal editorial.


New books from Ecuador and Dominican Republic

Both Ecuador and the Dominican Republic represent the diversity of publishing patters and traditions in Latin America. Some have questioned our logic to collect the Caribbean Studies related books from the Dominican Republic on the West Coast of the United States. While these questions are relevant and important, each library decides on how to go about building distinguished collections from a particular part of our continent and world. One way to create a degree of uniqueness is to purchase and curate the collection of the DR books here in our general collections.

Below are two albums of books from Ecuador and the Dominican Republic. Please click on the icons of the photos to get accessed to our recent purchases of these books.

Fair Academic use!

 


“Literatura de Cordel” Collection at UC Berkeley

Literatura de Cordel” or “Cordel Literature or Literature on a string” represents a Brazilian literary tradition that revolves around selling these chapbooks by hanging them on strings at the stalls primarily in Northeastern Brazil.  At the UC Berkeley library,  we will be launching a limited collecting activity around developing a sustainable collection of these booklets. Most of these booklets are as a rule deposited in the Special Collections departments and circulate on a limited basis. As these do not go out on the Interlibrary Loan, it was deemed necessary to support and instructions of Professor Candace Slater and Professor Nathaniel Wolfson through limited acquisitions of these literary objects. Professor Slater’s book on the genre is well-known.  Please click on the icon below to access the images. The booklets will be deposited for building use only in our NRLF upon cataloging.

academic use only.
Literatura de Cordel Collection at UC Berkeley’s Doe Library!

Please note the following:

Property rights to the physical object belong to the UC Berkeley Library. Literary rights, including copyright, are retained by the creators and their heirs. It is the responsibility of the researcher to determine who holds the copyright and pursue the copyright owner or his or her heir for permission to publish where The UC Regents do not hold the copyright.

Select new books from Argentina @ Doe Library!

I hope that everyone’s summer is going well. During the summer, we have been busy selecting and purchasing books from several Latin American nations. I present you today with the images of our purchases of new books from Argentina. I wish you a healthy and productive summer. You can get access to all of the pictures by clicking here.

Select new books from Argentina!


Nahuatl

The Languages of Berkeley: An Online Exhibition

Nahuatl
Title page from edition in the John Carter Brown Library 

Written in Nahuatl, the language of the Aztecs, the Primera parte del sermonario, dominical, y sanctoral, en lengua mexicana was published in Mexico City in 1624 at Juan de Alcázar’s printing press. The title of this collection of sermons is representative of the early colonial printing in Mexico City as well as the Augustinian order’s testament to the proselytizing efforts of the Catholic Church in Mexico. Only the first part of this Nahuatl text was ever published. Its author, Fr. Juan de Mijangos, is also well known for his Espejo Divino (1607).  

As noted by Hortensia Calvo, director of the Latin American Library at Tulane University, Spain’s ideological, political and administrative control was possible with the early colonial press: “The first presses were brought to Mexico City and Lima for the explicit purpose of aiding missionaries in the Christianization of the native population.”[1]  However, in the 17th century, following the Conquest, the Spanish occupiers dealt with many different populations of the region, hence many books were printed in the indigenous languages and, most importantly, not all texts were created for colonial or religious purposes. James Lockhart shows that, as early as 1545, the Nahuas of central Mexico adopted the Latin alphabet for their own purposes, beyond the interests of the colonial authorities and missionaries.[2] Indeed, former Berkeley professor José Rabasa argues that the “Alphabetical writing does not belong to rulers; it also circulates in the mode of a savage literacy. Bearing no trace of Spanish intervention in its production, the Historia de Tlatelolco exemplifies a form of grassroots literacy in which indigenous writers operated outside the circuits controlled by missionaries, encomenderos, Indian judges and governors, or lay officers of the crown.”[3] Several such texts have been digitized by the French National Library, including the Diario de Don Domingo de San Anton Muñón Chimalpáhin Chimalpahin Cuauhtlehuanitzin (1579-1660).

Nevertheless, Marina Garone Gravier notes “there was a lack of in-depth knowledge of Nahuatl by some who composed these early sermons related books.”[4] Since the foundation of the Aztec Empire in 1325, Nahuatl played an essential role in daily workings. Published 103 years after the fall of the Aztec in 1521, the sermon book featured here evinces the continuation of Nahuatl during the early days of the Spanish Empire. Frances Kartunnen points out: “At the time of Spanish Conquest of Mexico [Nahuatl] was the dominant language of Mesoamerica, and Spanish friars immediately set about learning it. Some of them made heroic efforts to preach in Nahuatl and to hear confession in the language. To aid in these endeavors, they devised an orthography based on Spanish conventions and composed Nahuatl language breviaries, confessional guides, and collection of sermons, which were among the first books printed in the New World. Nahuatl speakers were taught to read and write their language, and under Friars’ direction the surviving guardians of an oral tradition set down in writing particulars of their shattered culture in the Florentine Codex and other ethnographic collections of Fray Bernardino de Sahagún and his contemporaries.”[5]

Today there are over one million Nahuatl speakers in Mexico and in the diasporic communities in the United States.[6] Yet, there are several dozens of Nahuatl dialects and, since this non-Romance language adopted the Latin Alphabet, it is difficult to apply standard orthographic principles to all of them.[7] Nonetheless, the following are essential textbooks for the teaching and learning of standardized Nahuatl: Richard Andrew’s Introduction to Classical Nahuatl, James Lockhart’s Nahuatl as Written, Michel Launey’s An Introduction to Classical Nahuatl and, for more advanced students, James Lockhart’s edition of Horacio Carochi’s Grammar of the Mexican Language.[8] Many other resources are available in print and digital format; for example, the University of Oregon’s online Nahuatl Dictionary, Molina’s bilingual dictionary Vocabulario en lengua castellana y mexicana (1571), UNAM’s online Gran Diccionario Náhuatl, and the app Vamos a aprender náhuatl.  

Nahuatl language courses are available through UCLA’s distance learning program[9] and University of Utah’s Intensive Nahuatl Language and Culture Summer Program in Salt Lake City. The latter program, previously sponsored at Yale, has prepared many contemporary US-based Nahuatl scholars.[10] At UC Berkeley, the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues has offered annual Nahuatl workshops,[11] and The Bancroft Library holds over 460 items, including the Primera parte del sermonario, dominical, y sanctoral, en lengua mexicana, concerning the Nahuatl language in its renowned Latin Americana Collection.[12]

The librarian for the Caribbean and Latin American Studies has requested this post to be published on September 16, 2019, which is is celebrated as the day of Independence in Mexico.

Contribution by Lilahdar Pendse
Librarian for Latin American Studies, Doe Library
Carlos Macías Prieto
PhD student, Department of Spanish & Portuguese

 Sources consulted:

  1. Calvo, Hortensia. “The Politics of Print: The Historiography of the Book in Early Spanish America.” Book History, vol. 6, 2003, pp. 277–305. JSTOR.
  2. Lockhart, James. The Nahuas After the Conquest: A Social and Cultural History of the Indians of Central Mexico, Sixteenth Through Eighteenth Centuries. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1996.
  3. Rabasa, José. Writing Violence on the Northern Frontier: The Historiography of Sixteenth-Century New Mexico and the Legacy of Conquest. Durham, North Carolina: Duke University Press, 2000.
  4. Gravier, Marina Garone. “La tipografía y las lenguas indígenas: estrategias editoriales en la Nueva España.” La Bibliofilía, vol. 113, no. 3, 2011, pp. 355–374. JSTOR.
  5. Karttunen, Frances. An Analytical Dictionary of Nahuatl. Norman: Univ. of Oklahoma Press, 1992.
  6. Janick, Jules, and Arthur O. Tucker. Unraveling the Voynich Codex. Cham Springer , 2018.
  7. Andrews, J R. Introduction to Classical Nahuatl. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2003.
  8. Introduction to Nahuatl, Center for Latin American Studies, Stanford (accessed 9/12/19)
  9. Distance Learning Language Classes, UCLA (accessed 9/12/19)
  10. Beginners and Advanced Nahuatl Language and Culture Workshops, UCB (accessed 9/12/19)
  11. Utah Nahuatl Language and Culture Program (accessed 6/18/19)
  12. Latin Americana: Mexico and Central America, The Bancroft Library, UCB (accessed 9/12/19)

~~~~~~~~~~
Title:
Primera parte del sermonario, dominical, y sanctoral, en lengua mexicana : contiene las Dominicas, que ay desde la Septuagesima, hasta la vltima de Penthecostes, platica para los que comulgan el iueues sancto, y Sermon de Passion, pasqua de Resurreccion, y del Espiritusanto, con tres sermosnes [sic] del sanctissimo sacrame[n]to / compuesto por el P. maestro Fr. Iuan de Miiangos, de la Oaden [sic] del glorioso Padre, y Doctor dela Iglesia. S. Augustin. (1624).
Author: Mijangos, Juan de, d. ca. 1625
Imprint: En Mexico : En la imprenta del licenciado Iuan de Alcaçar : Vendese en la libreria de Diego de Ribera : año 1624.
Edition: 1st
Language: Nahuatl
Language Family: Uto-Aztecan
Source:  The Internet Archive (John Carter Brown Library)
URL: https://archive.org/details/primerapartedels00mija

Other Nahuatl texts online:

Print editions at Berkeley:

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The Languages of Berkeley is a dynamic online sequential exhibition celebrating the diversity of languages that have advanced research, teaching and learning at the University of California, Berkeley. It is made possible with support from the UC Berkeley Library and is co-sponsored by the Berkeley Language Center (BLC).

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Socialism On Film Trial at the Library through October 31, 2019

The library will have trial of a primary digital source that is entitled, “Socialism on film” through Adam Matthews. The trial will go on through October 31, 2019.

The database’s self-description is as follows, “Sourced from the British Film Institute (BFI), Socialism on Film documents the communist world, from the Russian Revolution to the end of the Cold War. This unique collection of documentary films, features and newsreels reveals all aspects of life behind the Iron Curtain, as seen by filmmakers from the USSR, Vietnam, Cuba, China, East Germany, Eastern Europe and more. The footage was originally sourced from communist states, then versioned into English language for private distribution in Britain and the West. This is the largest film collection of its kind to survive in Western Europe. The films have been conserved, digitized from the original 16mm and 35mm reels, and are fully transcribed and searchable.”

The image below is being used according to the Fair Academic Use only guidelines. The copyright belongs to Adam Matthews.

You might need to use your VPN or Proxy, if you are going to access the database from an off-campus location.