Art + Feminism + Race + Justice Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon

Library Wikimedia Poster

Join us at the Art+Feminism+Race+Justice Wikipedia Edit-a-thon
Tuesday, March 5, 2019
12-5 p.m.
Moffitt Library, Room 405
bit.ly/wiki-berkeley

Wikimedia’s race and gender trouble is well-documented. While the reasons for the gap are up for debate, the practical effect of this disparity is not: content is skewed by the lack of participation by underrepresented groups. This adds up to an alarming absence in an important repository of shared knowledge.

Let’s change that. Join us in 405 Moffitt Library on Tuesday, March 5 between 12noon-5:00pm for an all day communal updating of Wikipedia entries. We will provide tutorials for the beginner Wikipedian, reference materials, and refreshments. Drop in any time; trainings take place every hour on the hour.

Art+Feminism is a national campaign improving coverage of cis and transgender women, feminism and the arts on Wikipedia, and at UC Berkeley we will team up with the American Cultures program’s Race+Justice edit-a-thon. So, bring your laptop, power cord and ideas for entries that need updating or creation! For the editing-averse, we urge you to stop by to show your support. People of all races and gender identities are invited to participate.

  • People of all gender identities and expressions welcome.
  • Bring a laptop or mobile device if you can.
  • Drop in for half an hour or stay for the whole afternoon — it’s up to you!
  • No editing experience necessary; we’ll provide training and assistance.
    • Optional: Training sessions every hour on the hour.
    • Get a headstart! Create an editing account ahead of time.
  • Refreshments will be provided.

Interested? Learn more here and RSVP (encouraged, but not required). Don’t forget: your Cal ID card is required to enter Moffitt!

The Library attempts to offer programs in accessible, barrier-free settings. If you think you may require disability-related accommodations, please contact us at editathon@lists.berkeley.edu.

Let’s get editing!



New Books in Literature

Welcome back for a new semester! With new classes and a new year come new books at the library. The books we recently received have something for everyone—whether you’re looking for poetry, prose, or criticism.

Check out the rest of the new acquisitions!

Want a book that we don’t have in the library? Request it here.



Novels & the New Year: Resolve to Read More in 2019

Novels & the New Year

by Taylor Follett

A new year has come around and, with it, new resolutions and more books to read. Whether you’re participating in a Goodreads challenge, making time to enjoy yourself with a good book, or participating in a book club, we encourage you to join us and read more in 2019!

If you’re not sure where to get started, we have some recommendations.

Continue reading “Novels & the New Year: Resolve to Read More in 2019”


Pleasure in a good novel: Finding Jane Austen in the Stacks

Picture of Austen's books with quote "pleasure in a good novel"

by Taylor Follett

It is a truth universally acknowledged that a person in possession of some free time must be in want of a book. December 16th marks the 243rd birthday of one of the greatest writers in the history of the English language—Jane Austen. Austen’s work has been adapted in countless ways, from the many adaptations of Pride and Prejudice (leading to the eternal debate over which is the superior — it’s the Keira Knightley one), to movies inspired by Austen’s novels such as Clueless and Bridget Jones’s Diary, to those miniseries and movies made for those of us longing to be Lost in Austen or perhaps to visit Austenland. As the winter break begins, it’s the perfect time to visit the works that have inspired, delighted, and captivated readers for over two centuries. Luckily, like with any good library, you can find all of Austen’s full-length novels in Main Stacks.

Continue reading “Pleasure in a good novel: Finding Jane Austen in the Stacks”


New Books in Literature: December 2018

With winter break coming up, it’s a perfect time to get some reading done. The books we recently received have something for everyone—whether you’re looking for poetry, prose, or criticism.

Check out the rest of the new acquisitions!

Want a book that we don’t have in the library? Request it here.



Library Prize Exhibit 2018 about Frankenstein Now on View

Photo of whole exhibit
Photo by J. Pierre Carrillo for the UC Berkeley Library

“A king is always a king –and a woman is always a woman: his authority and her sex ever stand between them and rational converse.” – Mary Wollstonecraft

Recent Berkeley graduate Julia Burke begins her essay, “Over Mary’s Dead Body: Frankenstein, Sexism & Socialism,” a historiography and cultural critique of Shelley’s Frankenstein, with the above epigraph from Mary Wollstonecraft, the great political philosopher and Mary Shelley’s mother. Burke’s research into the reception of Frankenstein and in its possible influence on socialist radicals of the 1840s earned her the prestigious 2018 Charlene Conrad Liebau Library Prize for Undergraduate Research, an annual prize awarded to students who have done exceptional research and made significant use of the Library’s resources.

Burke’s paper is the subject of this semester’s rotating Library Prize Exhibit, located on the second floor of Doe between the Heyns Reading Room and Reference Hall. Drawing on the Library and the Bancroft’s broad collections, the exhibit outlines Burke’s arguments in visual form with digitized replicas of the original 1818 edition of Frankenstein, an early copy of The Communist Manifesto, letters, contemporary reviews, and more. The exhibition of Burke’s project coincides with the bicentennial of Frankenstein’s publication. Originally published anonymously, Frankenstein’s true author was greatly contested, as Burke explores. Today it is one of the most important works of the literary canon and the most read novel in undergraduate courses nationwide. The exhibit was curated by Stacy Reardon, the Literature and Digital Humanities Librarian, and designed by Aisha Hamilton, the Exhibits and Environmental Graphics Coordinator. The exhibit will be up until April 2019.

The Charlene Conrad Liebau Library Prize for Undergraduate Research is awarded annually, and submissions are now open to all undergraduates until April 18, 2019.  Any project from a credit course at U.C. Berkeley from Spring 2018 to Spring 2019 (lower division) or Summer 2018 to Spring 2019 (upper division) is eligible. The project can be in progress as of the due date of the application. In addition to a monetary award of $750 for lower-division winners and $1000 for upper-division winners, the recipients of the Library Prize publish their work in eScholarship, and two will be featured in an exhibit in the Library. Find out more information here.

You can see the rest of this year’s winners and honorable mentions here. Don’t forget to stop by the exhibit to see Burke’s work in person. More books related to Frankenstein in honor of the bicentennial can be found here.



Beloved Books and PBS’s The Great American Read

Beloved Books at the Library

by Taylor Follett

Since May of 2018, PBS has been hosting an 8 part series designed to get people reading, talking about reading, and to generate excitement about books called the Great American Read. PBS conducted a survey to discover the top 100 novels that Americans love before hosting a nationwide vote for America’s most-loved book. They announced the winner on October 23rd, in the close of their program. The winner?

Continue reading “Beloved Books and PBS’s The Great American Read”


Successes from National Novel Writing Month: NaNoWriMo 2018 Inspiration

NaNoWriMo cover
by Taylor Follett

Every November, a community of writers, professional and non-professional alike, embark on a challenge: to write at least 50,000 words of a novel, without starting prior and without going back and editing. National Novel Writing Month, or NaNoWriMo, encourages writers to push themselves to write an average of 1,666 words a day with the help of a virtual community, which also stages in-person meet-ups throughout the month, including at the UC Berkeley LibraryContinue reading “Successes from National Novel Writing Month: NaNoWriMo 2018 Inspiration”


New Books in Literature

November is upon us and, with it, what passes for cold weather in the Bay Area. It’s the perfect opportunity to curl up with a book! The volumes we recently received include something for everyone—whether you’re looking for poetry, prose, or criticism.

Check out the rest of the new acquisitions!

Want a book that we don’t have in the library? Request it here.



Workshop: HTML/CSS Toolkit for Digital Projects

Digital Publishing Workshop Series

HTML/CSS Toolkit for Digital Projects
Tuesday, November 13th, 3:40-5:00pm
D-Lab, 350 Barrows Hall

If you’ve tinkered in WordPress, Google Sites, or other web publishing tools, chances are you’ve wanted more control over the placement and appearance of your content. With a little HTML and CSS under your belt, you’ll know how to edit “under the hood” so you can place an image exactly where you want it, customize the formatting of text, or troubleshoot copy & paste issues. By the end of this workshop, interested learners will be well prepared for a deeper dive into the world of web design. Please bring a laptop if possible. Register at bit.ly/dp-berk

Please see bit.ly/dp-berk for details.