[Database Trial] Cuban Culture and Cultural Relations, 1959-, Part 2: Writers

The UC Berkeley Library had purchased the part 1 of Cuban Culture and Cultural Relations from Brill in 2017. Now, we are having a trial of part 2 of the same database-  Cuban Culture and Cultural Relations, 1959 that deals with the writers. The trial will go through November 15th, 2018.

The trial can be accessed here: https://primarysources.brillonline.com/browse/cuban-culture-and-cultural-relations-part-2


Escritura, Trama Y Deseo with Diamela Eltit

 

Escritura, Trama Y Deseo (Writing, Plot And Desire)
Diamela Eltit in conversation with Natalia Brizuela and Francine Masiello
Thursday, October 11, 2018
5:30-7:30pm
Geballe Room, Townsend Center for the Humanities

Please note: this event will be held in Spanish. Simultaneous English translation will be provided for those who need it.

Co-sponsored by the Arts Research Center and the University of California Humanities Research Institute, and the Center for Latin American Studies

Una aproximación a las vueltas y revueltas del imaginario literario y su conexión con el universo social. (An approach to the revolutions and revolts of the literary imaginary and its connection with the social universe.)

Diamela Eltit is one of Latin America’s most daring writers and is highly regarded for her avant-garde initiatives in the world of letters. Eltit began her engagement with literature in her native Chile during the years of the Pinochet dictatorship when she participated in the collective CADA, staging art actions against the dictatorship, and published her first novels, Lumpérica (1983) and Por la patria (1986), to universal acclaim. Since then she has published, among others, El Cuarto Mundo (1988), El padre mío (1989), Vaca sagrada (1991), Los vigilantes (1994), Los trabajadores de la muerte (1998), Mano de obra (2002), Jamás el fuego nunca (2007), and Impuesto a la carne (2010). She has been honored repeatedly by international organizations, among them the Modern Language Association in the United States and Casa de las Americas in Havana, and has received fellowships from the Ford Foundation, the Fondo Nacional de Investigaciones, the Social Science Research Council, CONICYT, and the Guggenheim Foundation. Eltit has also held positions as writer-in-residence at Brown University, Washington University in St. Louis, Columbia University, UC/Berkeley the University of Virginia, Stanford University, and Johns Hopkins University. She is currently the Distinguished Global Professor of Creative Writing in Spanish at NYU.

 


ARC’s 2018-19 program is a collaboration between ARC Interim Director Natalia Brizuela (Film & Media and Spanish & Portuguese), Tarek Elhaik (Anthropology, UC Davis), Anneka Lenssen (History of Art), Leigh Raiford (African American Studies), and Poulomi Saha (English), supported by a generous grant from The University of California Humanities Research Institute (UCHRI).

The year’s investigations on art and critique from/in the Global South will take off with a Workshop in Mexico City (September 6-8), co-convened by Natalia Brizuela and Elena Tzelepis (University of Thessaly, Volos, Greece), organized through the International Consortium of Critical Theory Programs (ICCTP) with the support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The Mexico City workshop will take place at the Museo Universitario de Arte Contemporáneo (MUAC) at the UNAM. More details on the Mexico City workshop can be found here


Thérèse Bonney: Art Collector, Photojournalist, Francophile, Cheese Lover

Thérèse Bonney aboard the S.S. Siboney, en route to Portugal, 1941.

Thérèse Bonney aboard the S.S. Siboney, en route to Portugal, 1941. BANC PIC 1982.111 series 3, NNEG box 49, item 19

Pioneering war correspondent and Cal grad Mabel Thérèse Bonney (1894-1978) was decorated with the Croix de Guerre and the Legion d’Honneur by the French government, and the Order of the White Rose of Finland for her work during World War II. Her photographs were exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, the Library of Congress, and Carnegie Hall during her lifetime. Her work on children displaced by war spurred the United Nations to create their international children’s emergency fund, UNICEF, in 1946, and inspired the Academy Award-winning film The Search in 1948. Yet in the canon of female war photographers that includes contemporaries such as Lee Miller, Margaret Bourke-White, and Toni Frissell, Bonney rarely receives mention. Bonney was a renaissance woman whose life deserves further study, and her collections at the Bancroft Library are ripe for discovery. Manuscript Archivist Marjorie Bryer has processed The Thérèse Bonney papers, and Pictorial Archivist Sara Ferguson has digitized over 2,500 previously inaccessible nitrate negatives from the Thérèse Bonney Photograph Collection.

ART CONNOISSEUR

While living in Paris in the 1920s and 1930s, Bonney modeled for fashion designers like Sonia Delaunay and Madeleine Vionnet, and became friends with many of the most famous artists and writers of her day, including Raoul Dufy, Gertrude Stein, and George Bernard Shaw. In 1924 Bonney founded an international photo service that licensed images acquired in France for publication in the U.S. She was often dissatisfied with the images she distributed, and this inspired her to take up photography herself. Bonney wrote about, and took photographs of, many of the artists and writers in her life throughout the twenties, thirties, and forties.

PHOTOJOURNALISM AND WAR RELIEF EFFORTS

Bonney photographed throughout Europe during World War II, focusing on the effects of war on the civilian population. Her photographs of children were particularly moving and resulted in her most famous work, the exhibit and book, Europe’s ChildrenBonney was actively involved with relief efforts after the war, particularly in the Alsace region of France. She also founded a number of organizations dedicated to promoting friendship between citizens of France and the United States, and improving Franco-American political relations. One effort, the Chain d’Amite, encouraged French families to open their homes to American G.I.s; another, Project Patriotism, inspired airmen who were shot down in France to help the families that had rescued them. Project Patriotism eventually spread to other European countries, including the Netherlands. Marjorie’s father-in-law, Peter, was a teenager when Germany invaded the Netherlands during the war. He was sent to live with relatives in the Dutch countryside so he wouldn’t be conscripted. One of Peter’s most moving stories was about the American pilot his family hid when his plane crashed on the family farm. Bonney’s papers include many poignant letters from U.S. soldiers and, while processing the collection, Marjorie wondered what this airman from Brooklyn might have written about his experiences with his Dutch “family.”

LOVER OF CHEESE

Bonney’s many interests included food and cooking. She and her sister, Louise, wrote a guide to Paris restaurants and a cookbook, French cooking for American kitchens. Her papers include her research on cheese, which she referred to as “Project Fromage.” Series 7 of Bonney’s papers include meticulous notes on various cheeses from France and the Netherlands, “technical” correspondence about cheese, and materials related to tyrosemiophilia — the hobby of collecting cheese labels.

EVERYDAY PEOPLE AND LIFE DURING WARTIME 

Bonney documented daily life during wartime across Europe. She recorded entire communities — their families, customs, and industries, their artists and politicians, their schools, and their churches. Her papers and photographs show not only the horrors of war but the hope and perseverance of those who lived through it.

NOW AVAILABLE AT THE BANCROFT LIBRARY! 

Newly digitized portions of the pictorial collection include Series 6: France, Germany 1944-1946. This series includes photographs of concentration camps Vaihingen, Buchenwald, and Dachau; Displaced Person camps; Neuschwanstein Castle; and Hermann Göring’s Collection of art looted by the Nazi’s. It also includes many images of the heavily bombarded town of Ammerschwihr in Alsace, France and war relief efforts there. Future digitization efforts will focus on Series 3, Carnegie Corporation Trip: Portugal, Spain, France 1941-1942.  This series consists of images taken while on a grant from the Carnegie Corporation of New York to document the effects of war on civilian populations. It includes images of military personnel, civilian industries, and Red Cross operations. Famous personalities pictured in this series include Pierre Bonnard, Henri Matisse, Georges Roualt, Gertrude Stein, Philippe Petain, Raoul Dufy, and Aristide Maillol.

Bonney’s papers help contextualize her photographs. They include correspondence; personal materials; her writings (autobiographical and articles about others); and her files on World War II, Franco-American relations, art, fashion, photography, and cheese.

Both collections are open for research:

Finding Aid to the Thérèse Bonney Photograph Collection, circa 1850-circa 1955 (bulk 1930-1945)

Finding Aid to the Thérèse Bonney Papers 

— Marjorie Bryer and Sara Ferguson


New Portal for Digital Collections of UC Berkeley’s Japanese Special Collections

Manuscript2-IzumiNikki-sm-1.jpg
Tsuchiya, Ayako 土屋斐子 b. 1759 . Izumi nikki 和泉日記 [Diary in Izumi Province].
Hand-written manuscript, after 1809. 
From Japanese Manuscripts Collection.

Since 2006, the Art Research Center, Ritsumeikan University (Kyoto, Japan) and the C. V. Starr East Asian Library have been engaged in collaboration to digitize parts of the Library’s Japanese special collections. Today we are pleased to introduce a portal website for these digital collections, which provides free access to digital surrogates of the following UC Berkeley’s rare and historical sources related to Japan for research, teaching, and exploration. In addition, the portal also provides access to digital images provided by other research institutions (see Berkeley Joint Project, Rare Book Database, which includes over 90,000 titles of Japanese rare books).

Old and Rare Books 古典籍: A small selection from the Library’s Edo printed books and manuscripts collections, mostly from the Mitsui collection acquired in 1950. The collection includes the links to digital images of 760 titles in the Database of Pre-Modern Japanese Works provided by the National Institute’s Japanese Literature.

Copperplate Prints 銅版画: Consists of ca. 2,400 individual prints produced in Japan between 1855 and 1920, distributed in various formats. The collection originally owned by Mitsui Takakata (1867-1945).

Sugoroku Sheets 双六: Consists of ca. 150 sugoroku sheets produced in Japan in the Edo through the Taisho periods. The collection originally owned by Mitsui Takakata (1867-1945).

Fine Art Auction Catalogs 美術品入札目録: A small selection from the Library’s art auction catalog collection printed during the Meiji through the Showa periods, mostly from the Mitsui collection.

To browse all the digital surrogates, click “search”  or “検索” button in any of the above mentioned databases. New materials are added periodically.

For any questions, contact Toshie Marra at tmarra@library.berkeley.edu.

 


Trial: Caribbean Literature (Digital Collection)

 

The Library has a trial to the Caribbean Literature digital collection from Alexander Street Press. The trial will run through October 31st, 2018. If the collection is of interest to you, the Library wants to hear from you! Please send your comments and feedback to sreardon@berkeley.edu.

What You’ll Find:

  • Full-text, digitalized poetry, and fiction produced in the Caribbean region, including Barbados, Guyana, Belize, Cuba, Suriname, French Guiana, Haiti, and Jamaica, during the 19th and 20th centuries.
  • Interviews, photographs, unpublished manuscripts, and archival materials from archives, rare book libraries, local publishing houses, and authors.
  • Texts in English, Spanish, French, Dutch and local languages and dialects, including Papiamento, French Creole, Jamaican Creole, Belizean Kriol, Singlish, and Sranam Tongo. Dictionaries and major reference materials are also available.
  • Authors such as Kwane Dawes (Ghana-Jamaica), George Lamming (Barbados), V. S. Naipaul (Trinidad), Ismith Khan (Trinidad), Jan Carew (Guyana), Alejo Carpentier (Cuba), Guillermo Cabrera Infante (Cuba), Roger Mais (Jamaica), Derek Walcott (St. Lucia), Edgar Mittelholzer (Guyana), Leon Gontran Damas (French Guiana), René Depestre (Haiti), Edgar Cairo (Suriname), Dionne Brand (Trinidad), Jean Rhys (Dominica), Denis Henriquez (Aruba), E. Kamau Brathwaite (Barbados), and Hugo Pos (Suriname).

The UC Berkeley Library also has temporary trials until October 31, 2018, for the following digital collections from Alexander Street:


New Instagram feed for Romance Language Collections


 UC Berkeley Romance Language Collections

The new Romance Language Collections Instagram feed brings forth little known and new resources and services in the UC Berkeley Library. Once you start following you’ll instantly receive early notices of new books, e-resources, exhibits, readings and more through your smartphone.


The news from CRL

As the member of the CRL, at UC Berkeley Library, we often use the resources that are loanable through the ILL or the digital resources that are available to us through CRL. I am glad to announce that we now have access to the following two important digital resources. One can authenticate using the VPN or EZ proxy to access these from an off-campus location.

I am pleased to report that the CRL has released of a new digital collection, the Mexican Intelligence Digital Archives (MIDAS). The collection will be hosted in cooperation with Northwestern University, El Colegio de México, and Artículo 19. MIDAS is an open-access online database of historical documents drawn from Mexican intelligence agencies. And the second is that of the digital version of the El Libertador: órgano del Frente Popular Libertador from Guatemala.

One can access the Mexican Intelligence Digital Archives (MIDAS) by clicking on the icon below provided one has authenticated using the UC Berkeley’s Proxy or VPN if accessing from a off-campus location.

 


Graphic Novels from Belgium, France, Italy, Portugal and Spain

Jacques Prévert n'est pas un poète
Jacques Prévert n’est pas un poète by Bourhis Cailleaux. Marcinelle : Dupuis, 2017.

Here’s a fairly complete list of most of the graphic novels acquired by the Library in the romance languages from southern Europe over the past two years. Some are critical or reference works, and a few English translations have been included as well.

List continues on the library research guide for European Comics & Graphic Novels—>

Fun by Paolo Bacilieri
Fun by Paolo Bacilieri. Bologna : Coconino Press, 2014.