Happy International Women’s Day-March 8th!

Today, March 8, is celebrated around the world as International Women’s Day. In the USSR, this holiday was celebrated rather religiously as the role of Soviet women in the success of the Soviet experiment and internationalist policies was undeniable. The conceptualization of the Soviet Woman as an idea was nuanced and complicated. A Wikipedia entry starts as follows, “International Women’s Day (IWD) is a global holiday celebrated annually on March 8 to commemorate the cultural, political, and socioeconomic achievements of women.[3] It is also a focal point in the women’s rights movement, bringing attention to issues such as gender equality, reproductive rights, and violence against women.”[4]

Image Source: Messy Nessy (https://www.messynessychic.com/2017/03/10/the-soviet-communist-origins-of-international-womens-day/) Fair Academic Use Only. The copyright belongs to the creator of the image.

Temma Kaplan’s article, “On the Socialist Origins of International Women’s Day,” provides insights into how this day became a signifier in the Socialist World. One however forgets that the origins of this day can be found in Germany as noted by Rochelle Goldberg Ruthchild in her article, “From West to East International Women’s Day, the First Decade.” Here you can access some materials from UC Berkeley Library’s catalog regarding International Women’s Day. Also, some posters from the collections of several California libraries can be found here.

One can watch an interesting clip from YouTube with a title, “Демонстрация женщин в 1917 году. Московские Новости. 8 марта 1967,” and a concert honoring women in the Soviet Union from 1984.

Below is the clip of a 1963 concert dedicated to International Women’s day:Концерт 8 Марта из Большого театра СССР (1963).

And here is a clip of protest on the occasion of March 8th from Mexico.


Just launched: the Global Social Responses to COVID-19 Web Archive!

We are pleased to announce that the Global Social Responses to COVID-19 Web Archive has been launched. Created in March 2020 at the onset of the pandemic — and curated by 29 librarians throughout the Ivy Plus Libraries Confederation and beyond — the Archive documents regional, social responses to the pandemic, which are critical in understanding the scope of the pandemic’s humanitarian, socioeconomic, and cultural impact. With an emphasis on websites produced by underrepresented ethnicities and stateless groups, the Archive covers (but is not limited to): sites published by non-governmental organizations that focus on public health, humanitarian relief, and education; sites published by established and amateur artists in any realm of cultural production; sites published by local news sources; sites published by civil society actors and representatives; and relevant blogs and social media pages. At the time of its launch, the Archive featured over 2,000 websites from over 80 countries in over 50 languages.

You can access the collection in Archive-It here: https://archive-it.org/collections/14022.

For more information about the Global Social Responses to COVID-19 Web Archive (including a full list of curators), see: libguides.princeton.edu/covid-ivy.

For a blog post that may be redistributed across the Confederation and beyond, please see the following: https://ivpluslibraries.org/2021/03/iplc-launches-the-global-social-responses-to-covid-19-web-archive/.

The Ivy Plus Libraries Confederation’s Web Collecting Program is an initiative of the Confederation’s Collection Development Group, under the direction of the Web Collecting Advisory Committee and Samantha Abrams, the Web Resources Collection Librarian. If you have questions about the Global Social Responses to COVID-19 Web Archive (or if you’d like to get involved by proposing one of your own collections), please reach out to ivyplusweb@library.columbia.edu.

I hope you’ll join me in recognizing those (copied here) involved in making this important resource available to researchers and the general public: Fernando Acosta-Rodríguez, Ellen Ambrosone, Yuusuf Caruso, Paloma Celis Carbajal, Stuart Dawrs, Charlotte Giles, Glaudia Götze-Sam, Tristan Hinkel, Bogdan Horbal, Lunja Jeschke, Thomas Keenan, Ksenya Kiebuzinski, Miree Ku, Joshua Kueh, Hyoungbae Lee, Heather Martin, Brandon Miliate, Brendan Nieubuurt, Setsuko Noguchi, Liladhar Pendse, Anna Rakityanskaya, Deborah Schlein, Joshua Seufert, Alain St. Pierre, Sean Swanick, Amy Torres, Gudrun Wirtz, Ryan Wolfson-Ford, and Lou Zhou.

Source: Samantha Abrams, Columbia University Libraries. Posted by Liladhar Pendse- participant-curator in the archival project (UC Berkeley Library).


Save the date: Black History Month Celebration at UC Berkeley Library-A webinar

Dear All,

We have organized an upcoming event that will mark Black History Month at UC Berkeley on February 26, 11-12:30 pm PST/ 2 pm to 3:30 pm EST. I wanted to thank our speakers for this event, and colleagues in the Racial Justice Taskforce,  Library Communications Team: Aisha, Amber, Tor, and Tiffany, who have supported me with organizing this event. The event is free and open to all. Please see the event poster (Thank you, Aisha-actual poster creation, and Tor-with edits).

The registration link is below:

http://ucberk.li/black-history-month-event


Trial of Brill’s Cuban Culture and Cultural Relations, 1959-, Part 3: Theater

The library has set up a trial of Brill’s Cuban Culture and Cultural Relations, 1959- Part 3: Theater database. We have access to the first two modules: Part 1-“Casa y Cultura,” and Part 2-“Writers.”

Description: This primary source collection documents the history of theater in Latin America and the Caribbean, with a special focus on Revolutionary Cuba. In addition, there are files about countries on other continents, such as the Soviet Union, the United States (with a focus on Latino and Chicano theater), and various countries in Europe and Africa. The collection covers theater groups, festivals, performances, and persons (actors, playwrights, directors). The collection is scanned from the so-called “vertical archive” at Casa de las Américas in Havana, Cuba.

https://libproxy.berkeley.edu/login?qurl=https%3A%2F%2Fprimarysources.brillonline.com%2Fbrowse%2Fcuban-culture-and-cultural-relations-part-3
Start date:      25 Feb 2021
End date:        26 Mar 2021


Webinar: Re-escribiendo las religiones negras en el mundo atlántico: Una conversación con Andrea Mosquera-Guerrero

Serie Voces AfroLatinx
Re-escribiendo las religiones negras en el mundo atlántico: Una conversación con Andrea Mosquera-Guerrero

English here | Se Requiere RegistroAgregar al calendario de Google

PLEASE NOTE: This event will be primarily in Spanish, with English interpretation available.

¿Cómo podríamos re-escribir la historia y la historiografía sobre religión, raza y arte en América Latina, el Caribe y el mundo atlántico? Andrea Guerrero-Mosquera discutirá el papel de los historiadores en el descubrimiento y el debate sobre el pasado de las personas afrodescendientes durante el período colonial. Su presentación nos invita a considerar las formas en que el arte, la cultura material y el performance pueden ayudarnos a comprender cómo las personas vivían y experimentaban diferentes formas de religiosidad en el pasado.

Dra. Andrea Mosquera-Guerrero es investigadora del Sistema Nacional de Investigadores (México) y es co-fundadora de la Red Iberoamericana de Historiadoras. Se especializa en las culturas afro-latinoamericanas en el mundo atlántico durante el período colonial.

Moderadora: Andreína Soto es candidata de doctorado en historia en UC Santa Barbara. Andreína se especializa en estudios de la diáspora africana, historia de las leyes y la religión, así como métodos de humanidades digitales.

Evento por Zoom: SE REQUIERE REGISTRO. Recibirá un correo electrónico de confirmación con el enlace y contraseña para el evento. Este evento será en español, y habrá interpretación en inglés a través de la funcionalidad de interpretación de Zoom. Si necesita una adaptación para participar plenamente en este evento, comuníquese con Janet Waggaman clas@berkeley.edu.

Presentado por el Grupo de Trabajo la Negritud en América Latina y el Caribe (Blackness in Latin America, BLAC) y copatrocinado por el Centro de Estudios Latinoamericanos. 

Jueves 25 de febrero del 2021, 12:30 pm hora del Pacífico
Evento Virtual de CLAS |
Agregar al Calendario de Google


Panel Discussion Decolonizing Epistemology: A Conversation with Latinx Philosophers

 

Thursday 2/18, 3:30 pm Pacific Time

Panel Discussion
Decolonizing Epistemology: A Conversation with Latinx Philosophers

REGISTER HERE | Add to Google Calendar


In honor of Argentine philosopher Maria Lugones, this round table will discuss the politics of epistemological decolonization, particularly with respect to philosophical and spiritual thought. The dialogue will engage a deeper understanding of how the project of multiple/plural philosophies/worldviews/ways of knowing directly contribute to a classroom, campus, and more broadly, national, climate of knowledge and respect for POC cultures and existence.

PJ DiPietro is an assistant professor in the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies at Syracuse University who works at the intersection of decolonial feminisms, women of color thinking, Latinx studies, and trans* studies.

Mariana Ortega is an associate professor of Philosophy and Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies at Penn State, where she researches Latina and women of color feminisms, phenomenology (Heidegger), philosophy of race, and aesthetics.

Chela Sandoval is a professor of Chicana Studies at UC Santa Barbara, and a noted theorist of postcolonial and third world feminism. She teaches about Indigenous texts, de-colonial feminism, liberation philosophy, and semiotics.

Gabriela Veronelli is an affiliated researcher at Binghamton University and Universidad Nacional de San Martin (Argentina), focusing on the relation between language and power in colonial situations from a decolonial lens.

Presented by The Decolonial Knowledges Research Initiative and co-sponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies, the Latinx Research Center, the Chicano/a Studies Program, Dr. Ivonne Del Valle, and the Social Studies Matrix. 

Zoom event: REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. You will receive a confirmation email with the link and password to the event. If you require an accommodation to fully participate in this event, please contact Abraham Ramirez at a_ramirez@berkeley.edu.

Thursday, February 18, 2021, 3:30 p.m. Pacific Time
Virtual event
| Add to Google Calendar

Thursday 2/18, 4 pm Pacific Time

Radical Kinship Series
Afro-Latinx Feminisms in the URL & IRL Spheres

Register Here | Add to Google Calendar

This roundtable discussion looks at Afro-Latinx feminist practices as they play out in online and offline spaces. This roundtable asks: How has social media expanded the ways Black Latinxs see themselves alongside others in the Black diaspora? What might a Black future look like if we merge Afro-Latinx URL with Afro-Latinx IRL spaces? And, who are the Black feminists in Latin America and the Caribbean redefining their own thinking?

Zahira Kelly-Cabrera is an AfroDominicana writer, musician and artist, known for advocating for LatiNegra visibility and rights on social media and for her unfiltered social critique.

Janel Martinez is an entrepreneur and multimedia journalist. A Honduran-American of Garifuna descent, she is the founder of “Ain’t I Latina?” an online destination geared toward Afro-Latinas.

Moderator: Alan Pelaez Lopez is a Ph.D. candidate at UC Berkeley, as well as an Afro-Indigenous poet and artist from a coastal Zapotec community in the state of Oaxaca, Mexico.

Presented by the Center for Race and Gender and co-sponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies, the Multicultural Community Center, the Womxn of Color Initiative, the Graduate Women’s Project, and the Berkeley Center for New Media at UC Berkeley. Zoom event: REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. You will receive a confirmation email with the link and password to the event. This event will be recorded.

If you require accommodation to fully participate in this event, please contact Ariana Ceja at aceja@berkeley.edu.

Thursday, February 18, 2021, 4:00 pm Pacific Time
Virtual event |
Add to Google Calendar

Thursday, 2/25, 12:30 pm Pacific Time

AfroLatinx Voices Series
Re-Writing Black Religions in the Atlantic World:
A Conversation with Andrea Mosquera-Guerrero

Español abajoRegister Here | Add to Google Calendar

How might we re-write the history and historiography of religion, race, and art in Latin America, the Caribbean and the Atlantic world? Prof. Andrea Guerrero-Mosquera will discuss the role of historians in uncovering and debating ideas about the past of people of African descent during the colonial period. She invites us to consider the ways art, material culture and performance can help us understand how people lived and experienced different forms of religiosity in the past.

Dr. Andrea Mosquera-Guerrero is a researcher at the Sistema Nacional de Investigadores (National System of Researchers, Mexico) and co-founder of the Iberoamerican Network of Female Historians. She specializes in Afro-Latin American cultures in the Atlantic world during the colonial period, focusing on issues related to race and art.

Moderator: Andreína Soto is a Ph.D. candidate in History at UC Santa Barbara who specializes in African diaspora, legal and religious history, and digital humanities methods.

Zoom event: REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. You will receive a confirmation email with the link and password to the event. This event will be in Spanish and English interpretation will be available through the Zoom interpretation feature. This event will be recorded. If you require an accommodation to fully participate in this event, please contact Janet Waggaman at clas@berkeley.edu 

Presented by the Blackness in Latin America and the Caribbean (BLAC) Working Group, and co-sponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies.

Thursday, February 25, 2021, 12:30 pm Pacific Time
CLAS Virtual Event |
Add to Google Calendar
_____________________

Serie AfroLatinx Voces
Re-escribiendo las religiones negras en el mundo atlántico: Una conversación con Andrea Mosquera-Guerrero

Se Requiere RegistroAgregar al Calendario de Google

¿Cómo podríamos re-escribir la historia y la historiografía sobre religión, raza y arte en América Latina, el Caribe y el mundo atlántico? Andrea Guerrero-Mosquera discutirá el papel de los historiadores en el descubrimiento y el debate sobre el pasado de las personas afrodescendientes durante el período colonial. Nos invita a considerar las formas en que el arte, la cultura material y el performance pueden ayudarnos a comprender cómo las personas vivían y experimentaban diferentes formas de religiosidad en el pasado.

Dra. Andrea Mosquera-Guerrero es investigadora del Sistema Nacional de Investigadores (México) y es co-fundadora de la Red Iberoamericana de Historiadoras. Se especializa en las culturas afro-latinoamericanas en el mundo atlántico durante el período colonial.

Moderadora: Andreína Soto es candidata de doctorado en historia en UC Santa Barbara. Andreína se especializa en estudios de la diáspora africana, historia de las leyes y la religión, así como métodos de humanidades digitales.

Evento por Zoom: SE REQUIERE REGISTRO. Recibirá un correo electrónico de confirmación con el enlace y contraseña para el evento. Este evento será en español, y habrá interpretación en inglés a través de la funcionalidad de interpretación de Zoom. Si necesita una adaptación para participar plenamente en este evento, comuníquese con Janet Waggaman clas@berkeley.edu.

Presentado por el Grupo de Trabajo la Negritud en América Latina y el Caribe (Blackness in Latin America, BLAC) y copatrocinado por el Centro de Estudios Latinoamericanos.

Jueves 25 de febrero del 2021, 12:30 pm Hora del Pacífico
Evento Virtual de CLAS |
Agregar al Calendario de Google

Coming in March: DocuLatino

Children in a boat, from Érase una vez en Venezuela, Congo Mirador. (Photo by John Márquez.)

DocuLatino
Érase una vez en Venezuela, Congo Mirador
(Once Upon a Time in Venezuela)

Directed by Anabel Rodríguez (Venezuela, 2020)

REGISTER HERE | Add to Google Calendar

We provide the film; you provide the popcorn! Join CLAS for a virtual film screening.

On Lake Maracaibo, beneath the mysterious silent Catatumbo lightning, the village of Congo Mirador is preparing for parliamentary elections. This once-prosperous fishing community is now sinking into the sediment, unraveling after years of criminal pollution and government neglect – a reflection of all the flaws of contemporary Venezuela. Focusing on two fierce, independent women who epitomize opposing sides of this vulnerable community, Rodríguez Ríos’s film is a stunning microcosm of a global battle to safeguard cultural heritage and retain political relevancy. 99 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles. 

Venezuela’s Candidate for the 2021 Oscar Academy Awards. 

English film trailer

Please note: Only available to watch in the United States.

REGISTER HERE for your free ticket. You will receive the link and password to watch the film on Vimeo on Saturday, March 6 at 4:30 pm Pacific Time. You can start the movie any time between 5:00 pm to 9:00 pm Pacific Time. At 10:40 pm, the link and film will no longer be available.

If you require an accommodation to fully participate in this event, please contact clas@berkeley.edu

Saturday, March 6, 2021, 5:00 – 9:00 pm Pacific Time
CLAS Virtual Event | 
Add to Google Calendar


Announcing a launch of new quarterly webinar series!-Save the Date, March 18, 2021

This event is the first quarterly event in a four-part series entitled “Connecting and collecting to empower.” The series will focus on libraries and library collections from different regions of the globe to highlight the collections, print, and electronic resources from often “forgotten” or “exoticized” parts of our world. No library is an island and as curators, we are often interconnected. It is a known fact that today academic libraries can no longer serve as an archive of all that was printed from a specific region. This series is geared towards students, faculty, and researchers, and the presenters in these webinars will be faculty, academic librarians, curators, researchers, and doctoral students. Each presenter will present how the library’s collections have aided them in their academic pursuits. What were some of the challenges they had to face when they were looking for specific resources and how and if the librarians helped them overcome them?

First Webinar:  The Other Asia: Central Asia and Library Collections (Spring 2021)

This 90 minutes webinar is dedicated to various library sources in Central Asia. Often, just like the Great Game in the 19th century, Central Asian Studies library collections are contested and relegated between the North American librarians for East European/ Eurasian Studies and Middle Eastern/ Near Eastern Studies. The US State Department, on the other hand, has attributed Central Asia alongside South Asia. Thus collecting Central Asian materials marks extensive collaboration among various librarians. The speakers at this webinar will speak to their efforts in collaborating to build a sustainable collection at their institutions. In this meeting, they will discuss some of the strategies they have used to develop research-level collections and collaborate with their colleagues in Central Asia. They will also focus on some open access resources.

This zoom event is free and open to all with prior registration here.

Thursday, March 18, 202111 am-12:30 PST/ 1 pm-2:30 EST

 

 


Celebrating African American History Month: Mexico

Every two days, I will post some more interesting books on Afro-Latinx communities of Latin America along with some video clips for your enjoyment. The purpose of these posts is to inform and celebrate African American History Month using print materials from Latin America. One might find some images extremely disturbing given the violence, injustice, and dislocation that took place in Mexico of these communities. We will post only three or four images each time. Please click on each image below to access the library’s catalog.


In times of Corona: Celebrating African American History Month and Latin America

As we celebrate African American History Month in the United States, America’s racialized past cannot be ignored nor forgotten. Latin America also has a large population of Afro-Latinos and this post is dedicated to providing our readers with some of the highlights from UC Berkeley Library’s collections from Latin America that deal with the nuanced history of Africans in Latin America. We have chosen only a few public domains and open access books that can be read online in times of ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Also, there are some books that are not in the public domain but can be read online by authenticating oneself using the UC Berkeley credentials.

We leave you with a clip about Argentina también es afro: Las conquistas de la libertad (capítulo completo) – Canal Encuentro