Trial of Brill’s Cuban Culture and Cultural Relations, 1959-, Part 3: Theater

The library has set up a trial of Brill’s Cuban Culture and Cultural Relations, 1959- Part 3: Theater database. We have access to the first two modules: Part 1-“Casa y Cultura,” and Part 2-“Writers.”

Description: This primary source collection documents the history of theater in Latin America and the Caribbean, with a special focus on Revolutionary Cuba. In addition, there are files about countries on other continents, such as the Soviet Union, the United States (with a focus on Latino and Chicano theater), and various countries in Europe and Africa. The collection covers theater groups, festivals, performances, and persons (actors, playwrights, directors). The collection is scanned from the so-called “vertical archive” at Casa de las Américas in Havana, Cuba.

https://libproxy.berkeley.edu/login?qurl=https%3A%2F%2Fprimarysources.brillonline.com%2Fbrowse%2Fcuban-culture-and-cultural-relations-part-3
Start date:      25 Feb 2021
End date:        26 Mar 2021


Library’s Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon: Coming Soon (3/10) to a Screen Near You!

Edit-a-thon logo and date-time

For many of us in the library, last year’s Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon on March 4 was the final program we held in person before the pandemic lockdowns (we actually wondered at the time whether attendance would be down due to the spread of the virus, but we had a great crowd).

Happily for us, the edit-a-thon, which is an event that gathers people together to expand and improve on the amazing information resource Wikipedia, can easily transition to an online format!  The National Network of Libraries of Medicine has been holding national online edit-a-thons for years, and there are many other wonderful offerings, themed and general, to take advantage of online (check out this set of events “Honoring Indigenous Writers” from the University of British Columbia).

So, this year, our edit-a-thon will be virtual.  Please come edit with us on Wednesday, March 10, from 1:00-5:00 PM! (or any portion of that time that works for you) We’ll use Zoom as a way to hold our guest speaker session and workshops on how to edit, and we will even have breakout rooms for the various editing preferences and needs of attendees.  More information and the schedule can be found here; the only thing you need to do is register using this form (in order to get the Zoom link), and show up online on the day!  (It would also be great, if you want to actually edit, to set up your Wikipedia account in advance)

And, about the guest speaker aspect of the event—this year, we are thrilled to offer a two-hour Wikipedia workshop (from 1:00-3:00 PM) created and led by Dr. Alexandria Lockett, from Spelman University in Atlanta, GA.  Dr. Lockett will discuss how both new and experienced editors can meaningfully contribute to underrepresented knowledge of Wikipedia through alternative research practices.

Questions?  Feel free to email us at editathon@lists.berkeley.edu, and we hope to “see” you on March 10!


Webinar: Re-escribiendo las religiones negras en el mundo atlántico: Una conversación con Andrea Mosquera-Guerrero

Serie Voces AfroLatinx
Re-escribiendo las religiones negras en el mundo atlántico: Una conversación con Andrea Mosquera-Guerrero

English here | Se Requiere RegistroAgregar al calendario de Google

PLEASE NOTE: This event will be primarily in Spanish, with English interpretation available.

¿Cómo podríamos re-escribir la historia y la historiografía sobre religión, raza y arte en América Latina, el Caribe y el mundo atlántico? Andrea Guerrero-Mosquera discutirá el papel de los historiadores en el descubrimiento y el debate sobre el pasado de las personas afrodescendientes durante el período colonial. Su presentación nos invita a considerar las formas en que el arte, la cultura material y el performance pueden ayudarnos a comprender cómo las personas vivían y experimentaban diferentes formas de religiosidad en el pasado.

Dra. Andrea Mosquera-Guerrero es investigadora del Sistema Nacional de Investigadores (México) y es co-fundadora de la Red Iberoamericana de Historiadoras. Se especializa en las culturas afro-latinoamericanas en el mundo atlántico durante el período colonial.

Moderadora: Andreína Soto es candidata de doctorado en historia en UC Santa Barbara. Andreína se especializa en estudios de la diáspora africana, historia de las leyes y la religión, así como métodos de humanidades digitales.

Evento por Zoom: SE REQUIERE REGISTRO. Recibirá un correo electrónico de confirmación con el enlace y contraseña para el evento. Este evento será en español, y habrá interpretación en inglés a través de la funcionalidad de interpretación de Zoom. Si necesita una adaptación para participar plenamente en este evento, comuníquese con Janet Waggaman clas@berkeley.edu.

Presentado por el Grupo de Trabajo la Negritud en América Latina y el Caribe (Blackness in Latin America, BLAC) y copatrocinado por el Centro de Estudios Latinoamericanos. 

Jueves 25 de febrero del 2021, 12:30 pm hora del Pacífico
Evento Virtual de CLAS |
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New Publication by Art History Faculty Anneka Lenssen

Check out the new publication by Anneka Lenssen, UC Berkeley Associate Professor of Global Modern Art, with UC Berkeley’s Oski Express.

Beautiful Agitation: Modern Painting and Politics in Syria by Anneka Lenssen

From University of California Press:

“In modern Syria, a contested territory at the intersection of differing regimes of political representation, artists ventured to develop strikingly new kinds of painting to link their images to life forces and agitated energies. Examining the works of artists Kahlil Gibran, Adham Ismail, and Fateh al-Moudarres, Beautiful Agitation explores how painters in Syria activated the mutability of form to rethink relationships of figure to ground, outward appearance to inner presence, and self to world. Drawing on archival materials in Syria and beyond, Anneka Lenssen reveals new trajectories of painterly practice in a twentieth century defined by shifting media technologies, moving populations, and the imposition of violently enforced nation-state borders. The result is a study of Arab modernism that foregrounds rather than occludes efforts to agitate against imposed identities and intersubjective relations.”

 


From the Oral History Center Director: February 2021

From the Oral History Center Director

At the Oral History Center, spring begins in mid-January. Usually for OHC staff this means longer lines for morning coffee and scarce parking spots becoming rarer still. While we’re not experiencing these early signs of spring in 2021, we are looking forward to another early seasonal ritual: our annual Introduction to Oral History Workshop

Amanda Tewes on interviewing methodology
Amanda Tewes on remote interviewing, remotely

This year the workshop will differ from those we’ve hosted in the past in two key ways: it will be hosted remotely, so that we remain safely socially-distanced with the added benefit of making is accessible to those who don’t live nearby; the second difference is that it will be held over two days (Friday March 5 and Saturday March 6) to better accommodate those who are in not in the same time zone as Berkeley. 

In addition to the slight changes in format this year, OHC faculty will focus more on the practice of remote interviewing. When the pandemic struck about this time last year, we put a hold on our almost-always-in-person oral histories and dedicated ourselves to a study of how we might conduct our interviews remotely while still establishing good rapport with narrators and capturing quality audio and video in our recordings. By August we optimistically put our toes back in the oral history waters by recommencing with our interviews. We’ve learned a great deal in the six plus months (and suffered no major tragedies) so we’re eager to share what we’ve discovered. Although we are all looking forward to the day when in-person interviews are once again the norm, we also recognize that remote interviewing now has a place in our work going forward — and we suspect you’ll want to know about this practice. 

Registration is now open for the Introductory Workshop as well as for the Advanced Oral History Institute, held every August. We look forward to seeing you (virtually!) and together pursuing oral history in this strange new world.

Martin Meeker, Charles B. Faulhaber Director

 


Workshop: Creating Web Maps with ArcGIS Online

Creating Web Maps with ArcGIS Online
Tuesday, March 2, 3:10pm-4:30pm
Online: Register to receive the Zoom link
Susan Powell and Erica Newcome

Want to make a web map, but not sure where to start? This short workshop will introduce key mapping terms and concepts and give an overview of popular platforms used to create web maps. We’ll explore one of these platforms (ArcGIS Online) in more detail. You’ll get some hands-on practice adding data, changing the basemap, and creating interactive map visualizations. At the end of the workshop you’ll have the basic knowledge needed to create your own simple web maps. Register here.

Upcoming Workshops in this Series – Spring 2021:

  • Text Data Mining and Publishing
  • By Design: Graphics & Images Basics
  • HTML/CSS Toolkit for Digital Projects

Please see bit.ly/dp-berk for details.


Of Molecules & Oral History: Script Review of NOVA’s “Beyond the Elements”

On March 12, 2020, an email arrived asking me to review three final scripts for the science series NOVA, the most-watched prime time science series on television with nearly five-million weekly viewers. Nearly a year later in February 2021, I’m delighted to see those NOVA episodes premier on PBS as the three-part series “Beyond the Elements.” The first episode focused on molecular Reactions, the next on virtually Indestructible molecules, and the third episode explored molecules of Life. Watching these episodes and reading my name in the credits as a “Science Advisor” for NOVA was thrilling.

I’m honored and still surprised to be listed here as a “Science Advisor” to the NOVA episode “Beyond the Elements: Reactions,” which aired on PBS on February 3, 2021.

But let’s be honest: after this past year, I’m delighted to have thus-far survived the pandemic and everything else that 2020 threw at us! From shelter-in-place to shuttered businesses, from Zoom meetings to elbow-bump greetings, from wild fires to fascism, and from righteous calls for racial justice to right-wing mobs denigrating our democracy, it’s been one hell of a year. Watching these NOVA episodes on PBS offered me a reminder of all that we’ve experienced since March 2020 when I received that email to review NOVA’s final scripts. Reflecting on this past year, I now see how working on those NOVA episodes helped me to muddle through that difficult time last spring. It re-inspired my fascination with science as well as my passion for oral histories with wondrous people, several of whom do the fascinating work of science. Reviewing those scripts also helped me imagine a future beyond the then all-consuming pandemic.

What are your memories of March 2020? Mine are saturated in fear. I recall dizzying levels of anxiety. Focused concentration felt nearly impossible. So much seemed unknown in March 2020, but we knew enough to be scared. We knew a novel virus that emerged in China was spreading rapidly around the world, and especially, by then, throughout the Bay Area here. We knew of no medical treatment to stop its spread or its effects. And we knew many people would not survive this new disease. For me, fear of what we did know as well as what we did not know felt crippling. Yet in my inbox appeared that email reminding me quite kindly of my earlier agreement to continue reviewing and advising on these three NOVA scripts. They asked: would I be able to return my reviews in the next two weeks? I thought: would my family and I even be alive in two weeks? At least, that’s where my mind was at in March 2020. Even so, I agreed to return my edits as quickly as I could—perhaps as a kind of pandemic denial, a naive attempt to reclaim normalcy.

As it happened, reviewing those scripts was both interesting and inspiring. Interesting, of course, because NOVA’s episodes of “Beyond the Elements” are captivating. The shows build from NOVA’s earlier special episodes on hunting atomic elements with these new episodes exploring the key molecules and chemical reactions that have shaped and continue to shape our lives and the universe as we know it. David Pogue hosts these episodes in his adventurous and cheeky way with excellent demonstrations and explanations by leading scientists, all accompanied by beautiful graphics and special effects. These stories about nature’s most fascinating molecular interactions are delightful, as are the scientists themselves who tell those stories.

To my surprise, reviewing those scripts last spring also gave me hope and helped lift me out of my initial, deep COVID despair. After prior years of commenting on and reviewing iterations of scripts for “Beyond the Elements,” that last round of edits in March 2020 arose at a difficult time. But that work helped ground me with a higher purpose and a commitment to others. It enabled my imagining of a future when this NOVA series would finally broadcast to millions of viewers. It helped move me beyond my immediate fears during that harrowing March of 2020. And it helped me, as an oral historian, to re-engage in our sacred project of building knowledge and sharing it through engaging narratives.

Upon submitting my review of the NOVA episodes, I found renewed purpose for sharing our own delightful stories about science as told by our fascinating oral history narrators. My colleagues in the Oral History Center all re-committed to our ongoing projects that spring and summer. Pandemic notwithstanding—very much in spite of it—we adjusted to our newly required remote-working situations, and we adapted our work flows, our fundraising, and our interviewing to not just survive this pandemic, but to find and create meaning during it. And through our collaborations, we even finalized a few of our own oral histories that, like NOVA’s “Beyond the Elements,” explore the interactions of molecules.

Michael R. Schilling stands before a pyrolysis–gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (or Py-GC/MS) instrument used to separate and identify molecules in art samples at the Getty Conservation Institute. (April 2019)

By August of 2020, we published my fifteen-hours-long interview with Alexis T. Bell, the Dow Professor of Sustainable Chemistry in UC Berkeley’s Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, who is a world-renowned leader in catalysis and chemical-reaction engineering.  In September 2020, Paul Burnett published his detailed oral history with John Prausnitz, a professor since 1955 in Berkeley’s Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, who helped pioneer the field of molecular thermodynamics. And in October of 2020, we published my oral history with Michael R. Schilling, a chemist in Los Angeles at the Getty Conservation Institute who specializes in new and complex methods for analyzing the molecules in materials used by artists and art conservators.

My proud parents watched NOVA’s episode “Beyond the Elements: Indestructible” in Florida on February 10, 2021, and my mother shared her photo of the Science Advisor credits.

For me, that work last spring on NOVA’s “Beyond the Elements” helped me discover a way to move beyond the pandemic. It helped refocus my privilege and pleasure in recording, preserving, and sharing the life stories of our oral history narrators. And while I wish our struggles with this ongoing pandemic were over, I’m very pleased to see all that we’ve accomplished this past year in the Oral History Center. Back in March 2020, when reviewing those final scripts for NOVA, I imagined the episodes would eventually premier at a time when the world had returned to “normal,” whatever that meant. As it happened, the episodes’ premiers in February 2021 occurred amidst our continued pandemic, which has lasted so long it seems to have become our new normal. Even if our slow and sad dance with COVID-19 continues, I’m very pleased to have seen “Beyond the Elements” broadcast on PBS and to be listed as a “Science Advisor.” And I’m equally grateful for the lessons those episodes taught me, both about the science of molecular interactions but especially on the importance of meaningful endeavors during difficult times.

— Roger Eardley-Pryor, PhD

Oral History Center of The Bancroft Library


Panel Discussion Decolonizing Epistemology: A Conversation with Latinx Philosophers

 

Thursday 2/18, 3:30 pm Pacific Time

Panel Discussion
Decolonizing Epistemology: A Conversation with Latinx Philosophers

REGISTER HERE | Add to Google Calendar


In honor of Argentine philosopher Maria Lugones, this round table will discuss the politics of epistemological decolonization, particularly with respect to philosophical and spiritual thought. The dialogue will engage a deeper understanding of how the project of multiple/plural philosophies/worldviews/ways of knowing directly contribute to a classroom, campus, and more broadly, national, climate of knowledge and respect for POC cultures and existence.

PJ DiPietro is an assistant professor in the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies at Syracuse University who works at the intersection of decolonial feminisms, women of color thinking, Latinx studies, and trans* studies.

Mariana Ortega is an associate professor of Philosophy and Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies at Penn State, where she researches Latina and women of color feminisms, phenomenology (Heidegger), philosophy of race, and aesthetics.

Chela Sandoval is a professor of Chicana Studies at UC Santa Barbara, and a noted theorist of postcolonial and third world feminism. She teaches about Indigenous texts, de-colonial feminism, liberation philosophy, and semiotics.

Gabriela Veronelli is an affiliated researcher at Binghamton University and Universidad Nacional de San Martin (Argentina), focusing on the relation between language and power in colonial situations from a decolonial lens.

Presented by The Decolonial Knowledges Research Initiative and co-sponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies, the Latinx Research Center, the Chicano/a Studies Program, Dr. Ivonne Del Valle, and the Social Studies Matrix. 

Zoom event: REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. You will receive a confirmation email with the link and password to the event. If you require an accommodation to fully participate in this event, please contact Abraham Ramirez at a_ramirez@berkeley.edu.

Thursday, February 18, 2021, 3:30 p.m. Pacific Time
Virtual event
| Add to Google Calendar

Thursday 2/18, 4 pm Pacific Time

Radical Kinship Series
Afro-Latinx Feminisms in the URL & IRL Spheres

Register Here | Add to Google Calendar

This roundtable discussion looks at Afro-Latinx feminist practices as they play out in online and offline spaces. This roundtable asks: How has social media expanded the ways Black Latinxs see themselves alongside others in the Black diaspora? What might a Black future look like if we merge Afro-Latinx URL with Afro-Latinx IRL spaces? And, who are the Black feminists in Latin America and the Caribbean redefining their own thinking?

Zahira Kelly-Cabrera is an AfroDominicana writer, musician and artist, known for advocating for LatiNegra visibility and rights on social media and for her unfiltered social critique.

Janel Martinez is an entrepreneur and multimedia journalist. A Honduran-American of Garifuna descent, she is the founder of “Ain’t I Latina?” an online destination geared toward Afro-Latinas.

Moderator: Alan Pelaez Lopez is a Ph.D. candidate at UC Berkeley, as well as an Afro-Indigenous poet and artist from a coastal Zapotec community in the state of Oaxaca, Mexico.

Presented by the Center for Race and Gender and co-sponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies, the Multicultural Community Center, the Womxn of Color Initiative, the Graduate Women’s Project, and the Berkeley Center for New Media at UC Berkeley. Zoom event: REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. You will receive a confirmation email with the link and password to the event. This event will be recorded.

If you require accommodation to fully participate in this event, please contact Ariana Ceja at aceja@berkeley.edu.

Thursday, February 18, 2021, 4:00 pm Pacific Time
Virtual event |
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Thursday, 2/25, 12:30 pm Pacific Time

AfroLatinx Voices Series
Re-Writing Black Religions in the Atlantic World:
A Conversation with Andrea Mosquera-Guerrero

Español abajoRegister Here | Add to Google Calendar

How might we re-write the history and historiography of religion, race, and art in Latin America, the Caribbean and the Atlantic world? Prof. Andrea Guerrero-Mosquera will discuss the role of historians in uncovering and debating ideas about the past of people of African descent during the colonial period. She invites us to consider the ways art, material culture and performance can help us understand how people lived and experienced different forms of religiosity in the past.

Dr. Andrea Mosquera-Guerrero is a researcher at the Sistema Nacional de Investigadores (National System of Researchers, Mexico) and co-founder of the Iberoamerican Network of Female Historians. She specializes in Afro-Latin American cultures in the Atlantic world during the colonial period, focusing on issues related to race and art.

Moderator: Andreína Soto is a Ph.D. candidate in History at UC Santa Barbara who specializes in African diaspora, legal and religious history, and digital humanities methods.

Zoom event: REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. You will receive a confirmation email with the link and password to the event. This event will be in Spanish and English interpretation will be available through the Zoom interpretation feature. This event will be recorded. If you require an accommodation to fully participate in this event, please contact Janet Waggaman at clas@berkeley.edu 

Presented by the Blackness in Latin America and the Caribbean (BLAC) Working Group, and co-sponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies.

Thursday, February 25, 2021, 12:30 pm Pacific Time
CLAS Virtual Event |
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_____________________

Serie AfroLatinx Voces
Re-escribiendo las religiones negras en el mundo atlántico: Una conversación con Andrea Mosquera-Guerrero

Se Requiere RegistroAgregar al Calendario de Google

¿Cómo podríamos re-escribir la historia y la historiografía sobre religión, raza y arte en América Latina, el Caribe y el mundo atlántico? Andrea Guerrero-Mosquera discutirá el papel de los historiadores en el descubrimiento y el debate sobre el pasado de las personas afrodescendientes durante el período colonial. Nos invita a considerar las formas en que el arte, la cultura material y el performance pueden ayudarnos a comprender cómo las personas vivían y experimentaban diferentes formas de religiosidad en el pasado.

Dra. Andrea Mosquera-Guerrero es investigadora del Sistema Nacional de Investigadores (México) y es co-fundadora de la Red Iberoamericana de Historiadoras. Se especializa en las culturas afro-latinoamericanas en el mundo atlántico durante el período colonial.

Moderadora: Andreína Soto es candidata de doctorado en historia en UC Santa Barbara. Andreína se especializa en estudios de la diáspora africana, historia de las leyes y la religión, así como métodos de humanidades digitales.

Evento por Zoom: SE REQUIERE REGISTRO. Recibirá un correo electrónico de confirmación con el enlace y contraseña para el evento. Este evento será en español, y habrá interpretación en inglés a través de la funcionalidad de interpretación de Zoom. Si necesita una adaptación para participar plenamente en este evento, comuníquese con Janet Waggaman clas@berkeley.edu.

Presentado por el Grupo de Trabajo la Negritud en América Latina y el Caribe (Blackness in Latin America, BLAC) y copatrocinado por el Centro de Estudios Latinoamericanos.

Jueves 25 de febrero del 2021, 12:30 pm Hora del Pacífico
Evento Virtual de CLAS |
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Coming in March: DocuLatino

Children in a boat, from Érase una vez en Venezuela, Congo Mirador. (Photo by John Márquez.)

DocuLatino
Érase una vez en Venezuela, Congo Mirador
(Once Upon a Time in Venezuela)

Directed by Anabel Rodríguez (Venezuela, 2020)

REGISTER HERE | Add to Google Calendar

We provide the film; you provide the popcorn! Join CLAS for a virtual film screening.

On Lake Maracaibo, beneath the mysterious silent Catatumbo lightning, the village of Congo Mirador is preparing for parliamentary elections. This once-prosperous fishing community is now sinking into the sediment, unraveling after years of criminal pollution and government neglect – a reflection of all the flaws of contemporary Venezuela. Focusing on two fierce, independent women who epitomize opposing sides of this vulnerable community, Rodríguez Ríos’s film is a stunning microcosm of a global battle to safeguard cultural heritage and retain political relevancy. 99 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles. 

Venezuela’s Candidate for the 2021 Oscar Academy Awards. 

English film trailer

Please note: Only available to watch in the United States.

REGISTER HERE for your free ticket. You will receive the link and password to watch the film on Vimeo on Saturday, March 6 at 4:30 pm Pacific Time. You can start the movie any time between 5:00 pm to 9:00 pm Pacific Time. At 10:40 pm, the link and film will no longer be available.

If you require an accommodation to fully participate in this event, please contact clas@berkeley.edu

Saturday, March 6, 2021, 5:00 – 9:00 pm Pacific Time
CLAS Virtual Event | 
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Graduate Student Conference: “Images of the Future in the History of Russian Culture”

Graduate Student Conference  

“Images of the Future in the History of Russian Culture”

Date: April 16-18, 2021

Deadline: March 25, 2021

Who can participate: MA students, Ph.D. students, independent scholars

Who organizes: Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences

Topics: The future as an element of political ideology; projects and experiments in the field of urban planning policy, social relations, and everyday life; ideas about the future in different social groups; images of the future in art and visual culture; utopian worlds in literature and cinema; religious and quasi-religious eschatology.

Format: Zoom platform

More information:

http://msses.vectors.tilda.ws/future2