Update: Moffitt Library’s first floor reopened after flooding

Moffitt Librarys first floor has reopened after flooding forced it to close last week.

The library will be open for studying for RRR week and finals, although working electrical outlets will be in short supply.

The flooding, brought on by heavy rains, had forced an evacuation of Moffitts first floor last week and caused classes held on that floor to be relocated.

Stay tuned for updates.


Movies @ Moffitt: On the Beach at Night Alone

Movie poster for On the Beach at Night Alone

On the Beach at Night Alone
A film by Hong Sangsoo

Wednesday, December 5, 2018
Doors @ 6:30pm, show @ 7:00pm
405 Moffitt Library
Free; open to UCB students only (UCB student ID required)

“Art imitates life in this quietly devastating masterpiece from Hong Sangsoo. Kim Minhee (The Handmaiden, Claire’s Camera)—in the role that won her the Silver Bear for best actress in Berlin—plays Younghee, an actress reeling in the aftermath of an affair with a married film director. Younghee visits Hamburg then returns to Korea, but as she meets with friends and has her fair share to drink, increasingly startling confessions emerge. No stranger to mining his own experience for his films, Hong, whose real-life affair with Kim stirred up a media frenzy in Korea, here confronts his personal life with a newfound emotional directness. With an incredibly raw and vulnerable performance from Kim at its center, On the Beach at Night Alone is one of the most dynamic collaborations between director and performer in contemporary cinema.”  — CinemaGuild

View the trailer and visit the website.

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December 6: Lunch Poems with Mary Jo Bang

UPDATE: This event has been cancelled.

Mary Jo BangThursday, December 6
12:10 p.m. – 12:50 p.m.
Morrison Library in Doe Library
Admission Free

Mary Jo Bang is the author of eight books of poems—including A Doll For Throwing, Louise in Love, The Last Two Seconds, and Elegy, which received the National Book Critics Circle Award—and a translation of Dante’s Inferno, illustrated by Henrik Drescher. She has received a Hodder Fellowship from Princeton University, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and a Berlin Prize Fellowship at the American Academy of Berlin. She teaches creative writing at Washington University in St. Louis.


Update: UC Berkeley Library adjusts hours for Thanksgiving week

The UC Berkeley Library is announcing adjusted hours for the week of Thanksgiving after continued air quality issues have led the university to cancel classes.

(Check the hours page for updates.)

The modified hours for Thanksgiving week are as follows:

Monday

Doe Library: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. (shortened hours)

Most other libraries, including the ones below, are open with normal hours:

Moffitt Library: Open 24 hours
Main Stacks: Closing at 2 a.m.
The Bancroft Library
Bioscience, Natural Resources & Public Health Library
Optometry Library
Chemistry Library
Earth Sciences and Map Library
Music Library
Business Library
Environmental Design Library
Anthropology Library
Social Research Library
East Asian Library
Northern Regional Library Facility (NRLF)

Others will be updated as final decisions are made.

Wednesday

Most libraries are open, but all are closing at 5 p.m. due to the holiday.

Thursday

Libraries closed for the holiday.

Friday

Libraries closed for the holiday.

Saturday

Libraries closed for the holiday.

Sunday

Most libraries open normal hours.


Movies @ Moffitt: Daze of Justice

Image from the film Daze of Justice

Daze of Justice
A film by Michael Siv

Wednesday, November 7, 2018
Doors @ 6:30pm, show @ 7:00pm
405 Moffitt Library
Free; open to UCB students only (UCB student ID required)

Daze of Justice is the intimate story of  trailblazing Cambodian-American women who break decades of silence, abandoning the security of their American homes on a journey back into Cambodia’s killing fields, only this time not as victims but as witnesses determined to resurrect the memory of their loved ones before the UN Special Tribunal prosecuting the Khmer Rouge. Only Daze of Justice takes us beyond the Killing Fields. The women must not only find the courage to remember their past, they also face an unexpected and agonizing predicament when they come face to face with Phang, the son of Kaing Guek Eav (Alias “Duch”), one of Pol Pot’s most notorious torturers. And in the process, on the margins of the UN tribunal, the seekers become the source of Justice. The women not only generate a vocabulary for reclaiming the past but pave a path that extends the promise of redemption to future generations.

View the trailer and visit the website.


NaNoWriMo 2018 – Come Write In

NaNoWriMo 2018

NaNoWriMo is back at UC Berkeley’s Doe Library!

Have you ever thought about writing a novel but just didn’t think you had the time? You’re not alone. A small group of friends from the East Bay dared themselves to finish their novels in 30 days back in 1999, creating the foundation of what has become National Novel Writing Month. Since then, this small nonprofit, NaNoWriMo, has inspired a global event of epic proportions! Fifty thousand words in 30 days! Quantity over quality is the name of the game. Turn off your inner editor, and win.

Are you working on a thesis, dissertation, or any other writing project (creative or otherwise) but could use a bit of support from the collective energy of fellow students or colleagues to help you stay focused and provide some inspiration? NaNoWriMo isn’t just for novels anymore — be a NaNoWriMo “Rebel,” and work on your academic projects, an article, a chapter, final research paper, memoir, screenplay, etc., and possibly find some new writing buddies along the way!

The amazing team over at NaNoWriMo created this worldwide community of writers and a support system of libraries, bookstores, and other neighborhood spaces all over the globe called Come Write In, where “Wrimos” gather and forge ahead toward their word count goals during their quest to win this book-in-a-month contest. With all the positive energy of over 300,000 participants, all writing together, winning is possible. Novelist or academic, all are welcome. I have been a participant since 2007, and the undeniable spirit of creativity that NaNoWriMo cultivates continues to motivate me to keep pushing forward, and I hope it will inspire you as well!

Come Write In, Doe Library:
November 4, 1-4 p.m., Room 180 Doe
November 10, 1-4 p.m., Room 180 Doe
November 25, 1-4 p.m., Room 180 Doe
November 30, 6.30-9 p.m. (Thank Goodness We Did It Party!), Room 180 Doe

Sign up at NaNoWriMo.org, and join the East Bay Home Region to see the calendar of events in our area and beyond.

The Library attempts to offer programs in accessible, barrier-free settings. If you think you may require disability-related accommodations, please contact Shannon Monroe at least two weeks prior to the event at smonroe@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6151.


November 1: Lunch Poems with Tyehimba Jess

Tyehimba JessThursday, November 1
12:10 p.m. – 12:50 p.m.
Morrison Library in Doe Library
Admission Free

Tyehimba Jess is the author of two books of poetry, Leadbelly and Olio which won the 2017 Pulitzer Prize, the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award, The Midland Society Author’s Award in Poetry, and received an Outstanding Contribution to Publishing Citation from the Black Caucus of the American Library Association.  It was also nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the PEN Jean Stein Book Award, and the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award.  Leadbelly was a winner of the 2004 National Poetry Series and named one of the “Best Poetry Books of 2005” by both The Library Journal and Black Issues Book Review.


Featured resource: Guides to November 6 ballot measures

The Institute of Governmental Studies Library has released guides to the 11 ballot measures on the November 6 general election ballot. The ballot measure guides, as well as resources on the gubernatorial and U.S. senate races, are featured on the IGS website at:

https://igs.berkeley.edu/library/election-guides

In addition to voter resources and descriptions of the propositions and candidates, the site features Endorsements tables where you can compare endorsements from political parties, newspapers, and other organizations.

Ballot Measure Endorsements
Governor Endorsements
U.S. Senate Endorsements

For more info, contact Paul King: pking@berkeley.edu or Julie Lefevre: jlefevre@berkeley.edu


Movies @ Moffitt: El Mar La Mar

El Mar La Mar movie poster

El Mar La Mar
A film by J.P. Sniadecki

Wednesday, October 3, 2018
Doors @ 6:30pm, show @ 7:00pm
405 Moffitt Library
Free; open to UCB students only (UCB student ID required)

“An immersive and enthralling journey through the Sonoran Desert on the U.S.-Mexico border, EL MAR LA MAR weaves together harrowing oral histories from the area with hand-processed 16mm images of flora, fauna and items left behind by travelers. Subjects speak of intense, mythic experiences in the desert: A man tells of a fifteen-foot-tall monster said to haunt the region, while a border patrolman spins a similarly bizarre tale of man versus beast. A sonically rich soundtrack adds to the eerie atmosphere as the call of birds and other nocturnal noises invisibly populate the austere landscape.

Emerging from the ethos of Harvard’s Sensory Ethnography Lab, J.P. Sniadecki’s attentive documentary approach mixes perfectly with Joshua Bonnetta’s meditations on the materiality of film. Together, they’ve created an experience of the border region like nothing you’ve seen, heard or felt before.” — CinemaGuild

View the trailer and visit the website.


Research Software Survey Results Published

“Research software” presents a significant challenge for efforts aimed at ensuring reproducibility of scholarship. In a collaboration between the UC Berkeley Library and the California Digital Library, John Borghi and I (Yasmin AlNoamany) conducted a survey study examining practices and perceptions related to research software. Based on 215 participants, representing a variety of research disciplines, we presented the findings of asking researchers questions related to using, sharing, and valuing software. We addressed three main research questions: What are researchers doing with code? How do researchers share their code? What do researchers value about their code? The survey instrument consisted of 56 questions.

We are pleased to announce the publication of paper describing the results of our survey “Towards computational reproducibility: researcher perspectives on the use and sharing of software” in PeerJ Computer Science. Here are some interesting findings from our research:

  • Results showed that software-related practices are often misaligned with those broadly related to reproducibility. In particular, while scholars often save their software for long periods of time, many do not actively preserve or maintain it. This perspective is perhaps best encapsulated by one of our participants who, when completing our open response question about the definition of sharing and preserving software, wrote ” ‘Sharing’ means making it publicly available on Github. ‘Preserving’ means leaving it on GitHub”.
  • Only 50.51% of our participants were aware of software-related community standards in their field or discipline.
  • Participants from computer scientists reported that they provide information about dependencies and comments in their source code more than those from other disciplines.
  • Regarding to sharing software, we found that the majority of participants who do not share their code, they indicated that had privacy issues and time limitation to prepare code for sharing.
  • Regarding to preservation, only a 20% of our participants reported that they save their software for eight years or more, 40% indicated that they do not prepare their software for long term preservation. The majority of participants (76.2%) indicated that they use Github for preserving software.
  • The majority of our participants indicated that view code or software as “first class” research products that should be assessed, valued, and shared in the same way as a journal article. However, our results also indicate that there remains a significant gap between this perception and actual practice. As a result we encourage the community to work together for creating programs to train researchers early on how to maintain their code in the active phase of their research.
  • Some of researchers’ perspectives on the usage of code/software:
    “Software is the main driver of my research and development program. I use it for everything from exploratory data analysis, to writing papers…

    • “I use code to document in a reproducible manner all steps of data analysis, from collecting data from where they are stored to preparing the final reports (i.e. a set of scripts can fully reproduce a report or manuscript given the raw data, with little human intervention).”
  • Some of researchers’ perspectives on sharing and preservation:
    • “I think of sharing code as making it publicly accessible, but not necessarily advertising it. I think of preserving code as depositing it somewhere remotely, where I can’t accidentally delete it. I realize that GitHub should not be the end goal of code preservation, but as of yet I have not taken steps to preserve my code anywhere more permanently than GitHub.”
    • “…’Sharing’, to me, means that somebody else can discover and obtain the code, probably (but not necessarily) along with sufficient documentation to use it themselves. ‘Preserve’ has stronger connotations. It implies a higher degree of documentation, both about the software itself, but also its history, requirements, dependencies, etc., and also feels more “official”- so my university’s data repository feels more ‘preserve’-ish than my group’s Github page.”

For more details and in-depth discussion on the initial research, the paper is available and open access here: https://peerj.com/articles/cs-163/. All the other related files to this project can be found here: https://yasmina85.github.io/swcuration/

Yasmin AlNoamany