Movies @ Moffitt: El Mar La Mar

El Mar La Mar movie poster

El Mar La Mar
A film by J.P. Sniadecki

Wednesday, October 3, 2018
Doors @ 6:30pm, show @ 7:00pm
405 Moffitt Library
Free; open to UCB students only (UCB student ID required)

“An immersive and enthralling journey through the Sonoran Desert on the U.S.-Mexico border, EL MAR LA MAR weaves together harrowing oral histories from the area with hand-processed 16mm images of flora, fauna and items left behind by travelers. Subjects speak of intense, mythic experiences in the desert: A man tells of a fifteen-foot-tall monster said to haunt the region, while a border patrolman spins a similarly bizarre tale of man versus beast. A sonically rich soundtrack adds to the eerie atmosphere as the call of birds and other nocturnal noises invisibly populate the austere landscape.

Emerging from the ethos of Harvard’s Sensory Ethnography Lab, J.P. Sniadecki’s attentive documentary approach mixes perfectly with Joshua Bonnetta’s meditations on the materiality of film. Together, they’ve created an experience of the border region like nothing you’ve seen, heard or felt before.” — CinemaGuild

View the trailer and visit the website.


Research Software Survey Results Published

“Research software” presents a significant challenge for efforts aimed at ensuring reproducibility of scholarship. In a collaboration between the UC Berkeley Library and the California Digital Library, John Borghi and I (Yasmin AlNoamany) conducted a survey study examining practices and perceptions related to research software. Based on 215 participants, representing a variety of research disciplines, we presented the findings of asking researchers questions related to using, sharing, and valuing software. We addressed three main research questions: What are researchers doing with code? How do researchers share their code? What do researchers value about their code? The survey instrument consisted of 56 questions.

We are pleased to announce the publication of paper describing the results of our survey “Towards computational reproducibility: researcher perspectives on the use and sharing of software” in PeerJ Computer Science. Here are some interesting findings from our research:

  • Results showed that software-related practices are often misaligned with those broadly related to reproducibility. In particular, while scholars often save their software for long periods of time, many do not actively preserve or maintain it. This perspective is perhaps best encapsulated by one of our participants who, when completing our open response question about the definition of sharing and preserving software, wrote ” ‘Sharing’ means making it publicly available on Github. ‘Preserving’ means leaving it on GitHub”.
  • Only 50.51% of our participants were aware of software-related community standards in their field or discipline.
  • Participants from computer scientists reported that they provide information about dependencies and comments in their source code more than those from other disciplines.
  • Regarding to sharing software, we found that the majority of participants who do not share their code, they indicated that had privacy issues and time limitation to prepare code for sharing.
  • Regarding to preservation, only a 20% of our participants reported that they save their software for eight years or more, 40% indicated that they do not prepare their software for long term preservation. The majority of participants (76.2%) indicated that they use Github for preserving software.
  • The majority of our participants indicated that view code or software as “first class” research products that should be assessed, valued, and shared in the same way as a journal article. However, our results also indicate that there remains a significant gap between this perception and actual practice. As a result we encourage the community to work together for creating programs to train researchers early on how to maintain their code in the active phase of their research.
  • Some of researchers’ perspectives on the usage of code/software:
    “Software is the main driver of my research and development program. I use it for everything from exploratory data analysis, to writing papers…

    • “I use code to document in a reproducible manner all steps of data analysis, from collecting data from where they are stored to preparing the final reports (i.e. a set of scripts can fully reproduce a report or manuscript given the raw data, with little human intervention).”
  • Some of researchers’ perspectives on sharing and preservation:
    • “I think of sharing code as making it publicly accessible, but not necessarily advertising it. I think of preserving code as depositing it somewhere remotely, where I can’t accidentally delete it. I realize that GitHub should not be the end goal of code preservation, but as of yet I have not taken steps to preserve my code anywhere more permanently than GitHub.”
    • “…’Sharing’, to me, means that somebody else can discover and obtain the code, probably (but not necessarily) along with sufficient documentation to use it themselves. ‘Preserve’ has stronger connotations. It implies a higher degree of documentation, both about the software itself, but also its history, requirements, dependencies, etc., and also feels more “official”- so my university’s data repository feels more ‘preserve’-ish than my group’s Github page.”

For more details and in-depth discussion on the initial research, the paper is available and open access here: https://peerj.com/articles/cs-163/. All the other related files to this project can be found here: https://yasmina85.github.io/swcuration/

Yasmin AlNoamany


Mindfulness at Moffitt

Students in a mindfulness class at Moffitt Library

Overcome insomnia & stress.  Focus the mind. Foster creativity, resiliency & well-being. No previous experience required. Open to students, staff, and faculty in the Cal community (UCB ID required to enter Moffitt Library). For the mindfulness-curious to novices and experts. Weekly practice or drop in.

October – December
Mondays, 12-1 p.m.
5th Floor Moffitt in the Wellness Room
.

For more information: contact Gisele Tanasse at gtanasse@library.berkeley.edu


October 4: Lunch Poems with Fady Joudah

Fady JoudahThursday, October 4
12:10 p.m. – 12:50 p.m.
Morrison Library in Doe Library
Admission Free

Fady Joudah’s fourth and most recent poetry collection is Footnotes in the Order of Disappearance. He is the recipient of a Yale Younger Poets prize, a Guggenheim Fellowship, Lannan Residency, and the Griffin International Poetry prize. He is the translator of several volumes of Arabic poetry into English. He is also a practicing physician of internal medicine in Houston, TX.

 


New: Early European Books Online

EEB

Early European Books Online (EEB) is a collection of digitized European books printed in the early modern period (1450s-1700). With strong representation in Danish, Dutch, French, Italian, and Latin among many other languages, this collection will be of interest to scholars in literature, philosophy, history, and religion. Works include those by Tycho Brahe, Michelangelo Buonarrotie the Younger (nephew of the painter Michelangelo), Nostradamus, Blaise Pascal, Rene Descartes, John Calvin, and many more.

The collection is drawn from the Danish Royal Library, the National Central Library in Florence, the National Library of France, the National Library of the Netherlands, the Wellcome Library in London, and others. It complements Berkeley’s access to Early English Books Online.

Search by country of publication, language, page features (illustration, musical notation), and source library. You may include historical and linguistic variants in your search. Books can be browsed in an online Flash-based viewer or downloaded as JPEGs or PDFs. Scans are of the entire physical object and pages, including marginalia and binding. Early European Books is moving to a new platform this year, so look forward to improved speed and usability.

Please contact a reference librarian or subject librarian if you have any questions.


Workshop: Omeka, Scalar, WordPress, Oh My!

Digital Publishing Workshop Series

Omeka, Scalar, WordPress, Oh My!: Web Platforms for Digital Projects
Tuesday, September 25th, 3:40-5:00pm
D-Lab, 350 Barrows Hall

How do you go about publishing a digital book, a multimedia project, a digital exhibit, or another kind of digital project? In this workshop, we’ll take a look at use cases for common open-source web platforms like WordPress, Drupal, Omeka, and Scalar, and we’ll talk about hosting, storage, and asset management. There will be time for hands-on work in the platform most suited to your needs. No coding experience is necessary. Please bring a laptop if possible. Register at bit.ly/dp-berk

Upcoming Workshops in this Series:

  • Publish Digital Books & Open Educational Resources with Pressbooks
  • The Long Haul: Best Practices for Making Your Digital Project Last
  • HTML/CSS Toolkit for Digital Projects

Please see bit.ly/dp-berk for details.



The news from CRL

As the member of the CRL, at UC Berkeley Library, we often use the resources that are loanable through the ILL or the digital resources that are available to us through CRL. I am glad to announce that we now have access to the following two important digital resources. One can authenticate using the VPN or EZ proxy to access these from an off-campus location.

I am pleased to report that the CRL has released of a new digital collection, the Mexican Intelligence Digital Archives (MIDAS). The collection will be hosted in cooperation with Northwestern University, El Colegio de México, and Artículo 19. MIDAS is an open-access online database of historical documents drawn from Mexican intelligence agencies. And the second is that of the digital version of the El Libertador: órgano del Frente Popular Libertador from Guatemala.

One can access the Mexican Intelligence Digital Archives (MIDAS) by clicking on the icon below provided one has authenticated using the UC Berkeley’s Proxy or VPN if accessing from a off-campus location.

 


Apply now: Moffitt Library Student Advisory Council

A meeting of the Moffitt Student Advisory CouncilWhat is it?

The Moffitt Library Student Advisory Council consists of student representatives who meet regularly with Doe/Moffitt Library staff to advise the library on policies, services, collections and spaces.

Council members:

  • Advise in the design and implementation of library policies and services affecting students
  • Offer student perspectives on relevant library issues
  • Gather input from other Cal students,
  • Inform the design and policies for the renovation of Moffitt Library
  • Represent the Berkeley Library at campus events and meetings
  • Serve as advocates for the library among the Cal student body

The Council consists of undergraduate students who bring a diversity of perspectives, academic experiences, and personal backgrounds.  Students must currently be registered at the University of California, Berkeley and in good academic standing.

What is expected of members?

Your role as a member will be to offer insights about how the library can best support students’ educational experience at Berkeley. Members provide an informed student perspective on policies, services, collections and spaces; participate in development of surveys and other assessment tools; and represent the Berkeley Library at local events and meetings.

Members are asked to contribute their ideas and opinions and respectfully consider other ideas brought to the Council. With a primary focus on the renovation of Moffitt Library, members are expected to be informed about the project and the planning completed to date.

The term of service is one academic year, with possible renewal of the appointment. Meetings are generally held several times per semester and are approximately 2 hours. There are likely to be other opportunities to participate through focus groups, online surveys, library events, and contributions to online forums such as the Moffitt LibraryFacebook page.

What would I get from the experience?

Serving on the Council will provide an opportunity to share with the library administration concerns of highest priority to students. Participation can provide connections for future references; be an opportunity to meet new friends and help create the kind of Berkeley community students want. You will be an influencing voice in shaping the library services and spaces important to you and your peers.

How do I apply?

Undergraduates can volunteer through an online application.  Interested students with questions about the Council may contact Jean Ferguson, Learning and Research Communities Librarian at  jean.ferguson@berkeley.edu.


Summer reading: Summer Lighting

Summer Lightning book cover

Summer Lightning
P.G. Wodehouse

It’s not just P.G. Wodehouse’s hilarious wordplay shot through the story that makes Summer Lightning such a treat, but equally the marvelously crazy, kind of sweet, and always and ever idiosyncratic British world you get to enter when you pick up one of his books. But a warning: Don’t read this on public transportation because too much laughing might startle one’s fellow passengers.

For a curious modern reader, Wodehouse’s books brim with tempting allusions from the literature and popular culture of the Edwardian era, the 1910s, the Jazz Age, and all the literature an English schoolboy of the time would have had to read. Take for instance Lord Emsworth’s niece Millicent Threepwood in Summer Lightning. She is a classic Wodehouse heroine — feisty, pretty, sometimes terrifyingly capable, but absolutely volatile and a little insane (those last two traits — like every other Wodehouse character).

Nor will Summer Lightning disappoint Wodehouse fans as a class, because it has its wonderful share of 1. broken engagements, 2. purloined items, 3. butlers. Last, just by the way, see the Wikipedia article on the Empress of Blandings, the book’s pig. Especially read the parenthetical words under the pig’s picture; they seem to have been written by a true Wodehouse aficionado.

That’s it for the 2018 Summer Reading List! Tune in again next summer for more great reads.


New exhibit: Immigration, Deportation and Citizenship, 1908-2018

Images from the new immigration exhibit

Immigration, Deportation and Citizenship, 1908-2018: Selected Resources from the IGS and Ethnic Studies Libraries” contains items from the Ethnic Studies Library and the Institute of Governmental Studies Library addressing historical attitudes and policy around immigration, deportation, and citizens’ rights, as well as monographs and ephemera relating to current events.

See accompanying Library Guide.

Location: IGS Library – 109 Moses Hall
Dates: Fall semester 2018
Open hours: Monday – Friday, 1pm-5pm