Read Nobel Prize in Literature winners Olga Tokarczuk and Peter Handke

Polish novelist Olga Tokarczuk and Austrian author Peter Handke have just been announced as the 2018 and 2019 Nobel Prize winners in Literature, respectively. Naturally, we might expect our vast collection of their novels to be in high demand!

Before getting  started in literature, Tokarczuk was a psychologist at the University of Warsaw, working as a therapist and volunteer psychologist at an asylum in western Poland. She cites her love for psychology as a significant influence on her literary career. She rose to fame with her third novel, Prawiek i inne czasy (Primeval and Other Times), an enchanting microcosm of 20th-century Poland. She has also built a strong collection of short stories, poems, and essays along with her bestselling novels, which have won her Poland’s Koscielski Foundation Prize and prestigious Nike Award and the International Booker Prize. Tokarczuk has paved the way for Polish literature on the international stage with her insight into the human psyche.

Handke initially studied law at the University of Graz in Austria, dropping out when his first novel,  Die Hornissen (The Hornets), was picked up for publication. Often the center of controversy and known for paying close attention to the “material presence of the world,” he has had much commercial success with his plays and scripts written for films, particularly with his 1966 play, Offending the Audience and 1987 film, “Wings of Desire.” Handke has not only won awards for his novels but for his films as well, including the Gold Award for German Arthouse Cinema and the Georg Büchner Prize for German literature.

Read these selected books by the two authors before they go flying off the library shelves!


Summer reading: Angle of Repose

Book cover for angle of repose
Angle of Repose
Wallace Stegner

Stegner’s novel, one of my all-time favorites, is relevant to the “Between Worlds” theme because, while it is set in the recent modern day, the main character, a history professor at UC Berkeley, is writing a book about his grandparents’ westward migration along the American frontier, where they often must reconcile civilized east and wild west. I read this during my junior year as an undergraduate and did not want it to end.

SARA QUIGLEY
Senior Data Visualization Analyst
Office of Planning and Analysis

This book is part of the 2019 Berkeley Summer Reading List. Stay tuned for more weekly posts!

 


Publish your scholarship like a pro!

Woman wearing gold watch, sitting at table, typing on a Microsoft Surface notebook
Photograph by Women of Color in Tech, CC-BY 2.0.

We’re more than a month into the fall semester, and if you’re a graduate student or postdoc you’ve probably been thinking about some of the milestones on your horizon, from filing your thesis or dissertation to pitching your first book project or looking for a job.

While we can’t write your dissertation or submit your job application for you, the Library can help in other ways! We are collaborating with GradPro to offer a series of professional development workshops for grad students, postdocs, and other early career scholars to guide you through important decisions and tasks in the research and publishing process, from preparing your dissertation to building a global audience for your work.

  • October 22: Copyright and Your Dissertation
  • October 23: From Dissertation to Book: Navigating the Publication Process
  • October 25: Managing and Maximizing Your Scholarly Impact

These sessions are focused on helping early career researchers develop real-world scholarly publishing skills and apply this expertise to a more open, networked, and interdisciplinary publishing environment.

These workshops are also taking place during Open Access Week 2019, an annual global effort to bring attention to Open Access around the world and highlight how the free, immediate, online availability of scholarship can remove barriers to information, support emerging scholarship, and foster the spread of knowledge and innovation.

Below is the list of next week’s workshop offerings. Join us for one workshop or all three! Each session will take place at the Graduate Professional Development Center, 309 Sproul Hall. Please RSVP at the links below.

Light refreshments will be served at all workshops.

If you have any questions about these workshops, please get in touch with schol-comm@berkeley.edu. And if you can’t make it to a workshop but still need help with your publishing, we are always here for you!

 

Copyright and Your Dissertation

Workshop | October 22 | 1-2:30 p.m. | 309 Sproul Hall

This workshop will provide you with a practical workflow for navigating copyright questions and legal considerations for your dissertation or thesis. Whether you’re just starting to write or you’re getting ready to file, you can use this workflow to figure out what you can use, what rights you have, and what it means to share your dissertation online.

RSVP (Copyright)

 

From Dissertation to Book: Navigating the Publication Process

Panel Discussion | October 23 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 309 Sproul Hall

Hear from a panel of experts – an acquisitions editor, a first-time book author, and an author rights expert – about the process of turning your dissertation into a book. You’ll come away from this panel discussion with practical advice about revising your dissertation, writing a book proposal, approaching editors, signing your first contract, and navigating the peer review and publication process.

RSVP (Book)

 

Managing and Maximizing Your Scholarly Impact

Workshop | October 25 | 1-2:30 p.m. | 309 Sproul Hall

This workshop will provide you with practical strategies and tips for promoting your scholarship, increasing your citations, and monitoring your success. You’ll also learn how to understand metrics, use scholarly networking tools, evaluate journals and publishing options, and take advantage of funding opportunities for Open Access scholarship.

RSVP (Impact)


On Display: Recent Publications by Art Practice and History of Art Faculty

Now on display on the Art History/Classics Library new books shelf:

Fifteen new publications written by, edited by, or featuring contributions by faculty members from Art Practice, History of Art, and Librarian Emerita, Kathryn M. Wayne.

 

display pic

Featured:

Picture Industry : a Provisional History of the Technical Image, 1844-2018, chapter by Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby

Eco-art History in East and Southeast Asia, chapter by Gregory P. Levine

How Art Can Be Thought : a Handbook for Change, by Allan deSouza

Seehearing the Enlightened Failure / Cecilia Vicuña, featuring essay by Julia Bryan-Wilson

Climate Change and the Art of Devotion : Geoaesthetics in the Land of Krishna, 1550-1850, by Sugata Ray

Picasso 1932 : Love, Fame, Tragedy : the EY Exhibition, with contributions by T.J. Clark

Hello Leonora, Soy Anne Walsh, by Anne Walsh, with contributions by Julia Bryan-Wilson

Sharon Hayes, co-authored by Julia Bryan-Wilson

Sir, by Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle

Mario García Torres: Illusion Brought Me Here, co-authored by Julia Bryan-Wilson

A Material World : Culture, Society, and the Life of Things in Early Anglo-America co-edited by Margaretta Markle Lovell

Heaven on Earth : Painting and the Life to Come, by T.J. Clark

Water Histories of South Asia : the Materiality of Liquescence, co-edited by Sugata Ray

Pieter Bruegel and the Idea of Human Nature, by Elizabeth Alice Honig

An Analysis of the Saltillo Style in Mexican Sarapes, by Katharine Drew Jenkins; edited by Kathryn M. Wayne; essay by Ira Jacknis

 

 

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Summer reading: The 57 Bus

Book cover for The 57 Bus
The 57 Bus: A true story of two teenagers and the crime that changed their lives
Dashka Slater

This gripping read explores the different worlds of race, gender, class, and privilege and how they explosively collide on a bus traveling from Berkeley to Oakland.

SUSAN EDWARDS
Head, Social Sciences Division & Social Welfare Librarian
Social Research Library

This book is part of the 2019 Berkeley Summer Reading List. Stay tuned for more weekly posts!


Recent Acquisition: An Analysis of the Saltillo Style in Mexican Sarapes, Edited by Librarian Emerita, Kathryn M. Wayne

Now available: An Analysis of the Saltillo Style in Mexican Sarapes, by Katharine Drew Jenkins 

Includes a reproduction of Katharine Drew Jenkins’ thesis (M.A. in Decorative Art–University of California, Berkeley, Jan. 1951).

Edited by Librarian Emerita, Kathryn M. Wayne,

and including an essay by Berkeley Research Anthropologist, Ira Jacknis.

 

ISBN: 9780967101392

cover

 

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Workshop: Publish Digital Books & Open Educational Resources with Pressbooks

Digital Publishing Workshop Series

If you’re looking to self-publish work of any length and want an easy-to-use tool that offers a high degree of customization, allows flexibility with publishing formats (EPUB, MOBI, PDF), and provides web-hosting options, Pressbooks may be great for you. Pressbooks is often the tool of choice for academics creating digital books, open textbooks, and open educational resources, since you can license your materials for reuse however you desire. Learn why and how to use Pressbooks for publishing your original books or course materials. You’ll leave the workshop with a project already under way! Register at bit.ly/dp-berk

Upcoming Workshops in this Series 2019-2020:

  • The Long Haul: Best Practices for Making Your Digital Project Last

Please see bit.ly/dp-berk for details.


Two New Art Practice Faculty Publications

Available now in the Berkeley Library – two new publications by Art Practice faculty members, Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle and Anne Walsh.

Sir, by Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle

ISBN: 9781933959382

sir cover

From the publisher website, Litmus Press:

“SIR is based upon the conceptual premise of a name that undefines the defined. Hinkle meditates on historical perceptions of the black male body and its contextualizing geographies in relationship to her brother, an African-American man born in 1980 named Sir. SIR interrogates naming in the African Diaspora to examine collective historical trauma, transgressive perceptions of the black male body, forms of gendering, and familial modes of survival within a hostile geography.”

 

Hello Leonora, Soy Anne Walsh, by Anne Walsh, with contributions by Julia Bryan-Wilson

ISBN: 9781949484038

 

From the publisher website, MIT press:

“Over the past decade, artist Anne Walsh has created an ongoing, multipart response to surrealist painter Leonora Carrington’s novel The Hearing Trumpet (written in the early 1960s, published in 1974). Walsh’s interdisciplinary works, encompassing video, writing, and performance, chronicle her time with the nonagenarian author and, ultimately, her assumption of the identity of the aging artist. Hello Leonora, Soy Anne Walsh is a visual and written “adaptation” of Carrington’s feminist novella, offering a narrative in fragments: a middle-aged artist named Anne Walsh falls in love with the 92-year-old author of a book about a 92-year-old woman who is placed in a sinister and increasingly surreal retirement home.

Walsh courts the author, travels to Mexico to meet her, fantasizes about adapting the book for film, and spends the next decade searching for The Hearing Trumpet‘s form and cast. Having discovered in Carrington’s novel a thrilling, subversive example of old age, Walsh casts herself as an “Apprentice Crone.” She stalks old people and takes selfies with them. She becomes a mother, passes through menopause. She sings her daughter’s Disney movie songs at “elder theater” classes. She studies and rehearses the trauma, the affliction, the indignity that is old age, and she writes to Leonora Carrington.

The story is told through facsimiles of hand-written letters, annotated research notes, post-it note flow charts, cast lists, scripts, and a photographic essay that loosely narrates Walsh’s visits to Carrington in Mexico City, with additional texts by writer Dodie Bellamy, art historian Julia Bryan-Wilson, and poet and critic Claudia La Rocco.”

 

Anne Walsh will be celebrating the publication of her book on Wednesday October 23 at 7 p.m. at East Bay Booksellers (formerly Diesel Books), and she will be featured at a Berkeley Book Chat event hosted by the Townsend Center for the Humanities, Wednesday, Nov 13, 2019 | 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 

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New in OverDrive

OverDrive is a UC Berkeley Library service for borrowing ebooks and audiobooks. You can access books online, download them to a device, or read them on an ereader such as Kindle. OverDrive is available to current UC Berkeley students, faculty, and staff. How it works: Simply log in with your CalNet ID, and you can start borrowing!

For more information, visit the OverDrive help guide.

Check out some of October’s new arrivals here:



New Books Added to Graduate Services in October

Looking for law in all the wrong places : justice beyond and between

Looking For Law In All The Wrong Places: Justice Beyond And Between edited by Marianne Constable, Leti Volpp, and Bryan Wagner

Theory and practice

Theory & Practice by Jacques Derrida translated by David Wills

They were her property : white women as slave owners in the American South

They Were Her Property: White Women As Slave Owners In The American South by Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers

Four novels of the 1930s

Four Novels Of The 1930s: Appointment In Samarra, Butterfield 8, Hope Of Heaven, Pal Joey by John O’Hara edited by Steven Goldleaf

Free all along the Robert Penn Warren civil rights interviews

Free All Along: The Robert Penn Warren Civil Rights Interviews edited by Stephen Drury Smith and Catherine Ellis