Resource: Bancroft Roundtables online

The Bancroft Library has updated its website with links to online presentations of most of the past Bancroft Roundtable events.  These include:

September 16th
Expanding Access to WWII Japanese American Incarceree Data Using Machine Learning
Presented by Marissa FriedmanDigital Project Archivist, The Bancroft Library
Watch online on YouTube

October 21st
A Good Drink: In Pursuit of Sustainable Spirits
Presented by Shanna FarrellInterviewer, Oral History Center, The Bancroft Library
Watch online on YouTube

November 18th
The Photographs of the Northwest Boundary Survey, 1857 to 1862
Presented by James EasonPrincipal Archivist, Pictorial Collection, The Bancroft Library
Watch online on YouTube


Event: Documenting the Japanese American Incarceration through Narratives and Data. June 2

Documenting the Japanese American Incarceration Through Narratives and Data

June 2 | 2-4 p.m. | Doe Library, Morrison Library

In person and online: ucberk.li/bancroft-symposium

Hosted by The Bancroft Library, Berkeley Library

The event is posted in the UC Berkeley Events Calendar here.

Session 1: Japanese American Intergenerational Narratives Oral History Project: Is Healing Possible?
2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

This session explores the Oral History Center’s ongoing Japanese American Intergenerational Narratives Oral History Project that documents and disseminates the ways in which intergenerational trauma and healing occurred after the U.S. government’s incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II. This project examines and compares how private memory, creative expression, place, and public interpretation intersect at the Manzanar and Topaz prison camps in California and Utah. This panel will include discussion with interviewers, and it will feature conversations with a clinical psychologist and specialist in intergenerational trauma who advises on the project and leads healing circles for narrators, as well as a narrator who was interviewed for the project.

Roger Eardley-Pryor, Interviewer, the Oral History Center
Shanna Farrell, Interviewer, the Oral History Center
Dr. Lisa Nakamura, clinical psychologist and Topaz descendant
Ruth Sasaki, Topaz Stories Editor
Amanda Tewes, Interviewer, the Oral History Center

Session 2: Giving Data Back to the Community through Computational Scholarship: Two Case Studies Focused on Japanese American Incarceree Records from World War II
3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

This session brings together two in-process projects that are working to encourage computational and ethical access to collections and data. Presenters from The Bancroft Library and Densho will discuss their projects related to records surrounding the forced removal and incarceration of 120,000 persons of Japanese ancestry during World War II. The intersectional and positional work of these projects highlights the importance of building new partnerships outside of the archives to create new content and implement community co-curation models to support on-going inquiry, knowledge-building, and exploration around this topic, with implications for vulnerable communities today.

Mary Elings, Interim Deputy Director, The Bancroft Library
Marissa Friedman, Digital Project Archivist, The Bancroft Library
Brian Niiya, Content Director, Densho
Geoff Froh, Deputy Director, Densho
Vijay Singh, CEO, Doxie.AI

These events will be recorded.

Funding for this event was made possible, in part, by grants from the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Japanese American Confinement Sites Grant Program and The Henri and Tomoye Takahashi Charitable Foundation.

Covid Protocols
We ask that participants comply with all health and safety guidelines and protocols recommended by UC Berkeley. This includes wearing a mask while indoors.

 All Audiences

 bancroft@library.berkeley.edu, 510-642-3781

If you require an accommodation to fully participate in this event, please contact Amber Lawrence at libraryevents.berkeley.edu or 510-459-9108 at least 7-10 days in advance of the event.


DH Fair 2022

The DH Fair is an annual event that offers the UC Berkeley community the opportunity to share projects at various stages of development, receive invaluable feedback from peers, and reflect on the field more broadly. Join us online Tuesday, May 3 for a keynote speech by Lauren Tilton and a virtual poster session.

Visit the DH Fair website for more information.


Primary Sources: Accessible Archives

Accessible archives banner

The Library has an ongoing subscription to Accessible Archives, which provides access to valuable newspaper content, county histories, early periodicals, books, and pamphlets. The collections can be browsed or searched (though the search interface is fairly clunky).

The most recent additions to Accessible Archives include:

  • African American Newspapers, Part XIV: The Canadian Observer, 1914-1919
  • Invention and Technology in America: American Inventor, 1878-1887
  • America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, Parts I and II

Primary Sources: Soviet Woman Digital Archive

The Library has acquired the Soviet Woman Digital Archive, an online source for the full run of Soviet Woman magazine.

Published initially under the aegis of the Soviet Women’s Anti-Fascist Committee and the Central Council of Trade Unions of the USSR, in the aftermath of WWII in 1945, the Soviet Woman magazine began as a bi-monthly illustrated magazine tasked with countering anti-Soviet propaganda.  The magazine introduced Western audiences to the lifestyle of Soviet women, their role in the post-WWII rebuilding of the Soviet economy, and praised their achievements in the arts and the sciences.

Additional Information:

The magazine covered issues dealing with economics, politics, life abroad, life in Soviet republics, women’s fashion, as well as broader issues in culture and the arts. One of its most popular features was the translations of Soviet literary works, making available in English, (and other languages) works of Russian and Soviet writers that were previously unavailable. An important communist propaganda outlet, the magazine continued its run until the collapse of the USSR in 1991.


Primary Sources: Books of Modern China & Picture Gallery of Chinese Modern Literature

The Library has recently acquired Books of Modern China (1840-1949), 中国近代图书全文数据库, a collection of more than 120,000 Chinese books published in Mainland China. Many of them are unique titles and are only available through this digital collection from the Shanghai Library.

The Picture Gallery of Chinese Modern Literature (1833-1949), 图述百年—中国近代文献图库 contains more than one million images that have been collected from books, periodicals, newspapers, and old photos held by the Shanghai Library.

These resources have been added to the History: Asia guide.


Workshop: By Design: Graphics & Images Basics

By Design: Graphics & Images Basics
Tuesday, April 12th, 3:40pm-5:00pm
Online: Register to receive the Zoom link
Lynn Cunningham

In this hands-on workshop, we will learn how to create web graphics for your digital publishing projects and websites. We will cover topics such as: image editing tools in Photoshop; image resolution for the web; sources for free public domain and Creative Commons images; and image upload to publishing tools such as WordPress. If possible, please install Photoshop in advance of the workshop. (All UCB faculty and students can receive a free Adobe Creative Suite license: https://software.berkeley.edu/adobe). Register here.

Upcoming Workshops in this Series – Spring 2022:

  • Check back for Fall 2022!

Please see bit.ly/dp-berk for details.


TRIAL: Mass Observation Project

Until April 28, 2022, the Library has trial access to the Mass Observation Project. Launched in 1981 by the University of Sussex as a rebirth of the original 1937 Mass Observation, its founders’ aim was to document the social history of Britain by recruiting volunteers to write about their lives and opinions. Still growing, it is one of the most important sources available for qualitative social data in the UK.

The Mass Observation Project consists of directives (questionnaires) sent out by the Project and the responses gathered.  They address topics such as the Falklands War, clothing, attitudes to the USA, reading and television habits, morality and religion, and Britain’s relations with Europe. Broad themes covered include current events, friends and family, the home, leisure, politics, society, culture and the media, work, finance and the economy and new technology.


Workshop: HTML/CSS Toolkit for Digital Projects

HTML/CSS Toolkit for Digital Projects
Monday, April 11th, 3:10pm-4:30pm
Online: Register to receive the Zoom link
Stacy Reardon and Kiyoko Shiosaki

If you’ve tinkered in WordPress, Google Sites, or other web publishing tools, chances are you’ve wanted more control over the placement and appearance of your content. With a little HTML and CSS under your belt, you’ll know how to edit “under the hood” so you can place an image exactly where you want it, customize the formatting of text, or troubleshoot copy & paste issues. By the end of this workshop, interested learners will be well prepared for a deeper dive into the world of web design. Register here.

Upcoming Workshops in this Series – Spring 2022:

  • By Design: Graphics & Images Basics

Please see bit.ly/dp-berk for details.


EVENT: Getting your book published open access: a panel discussion with Springer Nature and UC Berkeley

Are you a scholarly author interested in publishing a book, but unfamiliar with how to find an editor or press? Have you considered publishing that book open access and want to understand your open access book publishing options?

Springer Nature and UC Berkeley invite you to join us for a virtual panel discussion.

Hear from a panel of Springer Nature Open Access Books Editors in both STM and the Humanities, and a recent author about the process of getting your manuscript published.

You’ll come away from this discussion with practical advice about opportunities at UC Berkeley to publish open access books with Springer Nature, and guidance for submitting and revising your work, writing a book proposal, approaching editors, signing your first contract, and navigating the peer review and publication process.

While the event is focused on supporting UC Berkeley authors, it is open to all, as other institutions may be interested in entering into open access book agreements with publishers.

When: Monday, 14th March 2022; 11am-12:15pm PDT
Where: https://us06web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_VhjMRxIhQ3CmhYuPDv0nGw
RSVP: Please click on the link above to register and you’ll receive a Zoom link to join on the day.

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Just FYI, here are a few of the UCB authored/edited books made available OA through the agreement so far. There are several more in the works.