Open Access: Peruvian Historical Newspapers Digitized

19th Century Newspapers from Arequipa, Peru 

El Republicano (1825-1855) and La Bolsa (1860-1915) have been digitized as a result of collaboration between the Center for Research Libraries and Universidad Católica San Pablo, Peru. These newspapers are available at http://bd.estudiosperuanos.ucsp.edu.pe/  and are also at available through CRL.:

Below is a screenshot of La Bolsa on the page of UCSP. The image is being used for fair academic use only. There are other historical newspapers and images that can be accessed using the digital library of UCSP

The landing page of La Bolsa.

 


New Purchase: Border and Migration Studies Online.

Despite the COVID-19 related constraints, The UC Berkeley Library continues to purchase critically needed interdisciplinary databases that will enhance our ability to provide information and reference service to an extensive faculty and student body. The Social Sciences Division acquired one such database, and it is Border and Migration Studies Online.

The landing page of the Border and Migration Studies Online.

The images here are posted for fair academic use only and the copyright for the images belongs to Alexander Street (Proquest).

According to the self-description, the database provides historical context and resources, representing both personal and institutional perspectives, for the growing fields of border(land) studies and migration studies, as well as history, law, politics, diplomacy, area and global studies, anthropology, medicine, the arts, and more. At completion, the collection will include 100,000 pages of text, 175 hours of video, and 1,000 images.

This database is an essential tool to those who provide reference to several area studies related questions. One can find information on what is covered here: https://search.alexanderstreet.com/bord/about

The geographic areas that are covered are in the image below.


Seminar on Acquisitions of the Latin American Library Materials (SALALM) Resolution!

As a librarian for the Caribbean and Latin American Collections at UC Berkeley Library, I belong to a professional organization, SALALM (Seminar on Acquisitions of the Latin American Library Materials) that met virtually this week for the annual business meetings. During these meetings, a SALALM Resolution: Collection Development in the Time of Covid-19 was passed on June 10, 2020. While on these blogs, I usually inform the readers of library related acquisitions from the Caribbean and Latin America , I thought that it might be a good idea to share what is happening on the national scene in the field. So I share this text for informational purposes only. I understand that every library is facing circumstances that are unique as well as similar.

RESOLUTION 

By Collection Development and Equity in the Time of Covid-19 Task Force. June 10, 2020

In light of the COVID-19 situation and budgetary reductions, libraries are implementing policies focusing primarily on digital formats, SALALM expresses the following concerns regarding challenges in the collection development eco-system for Latin American and Caribbean Studies:

  1. Whereas, the majority of publications from Latin America and the Caribbean are print-only, and are not available in electronic formats, as UNESCO’s CERLALC reports in El espacio iberoamericano del libro;
  2. Whereas, e-preferred collection development policies will exclude non-English language materials and Latin America and Caribbean cultural and scholarly production, including the voices of Black, indigenous, LGBTQ, and transnational authors, which are so critical to advancing the research and learning of the region and their diasporas in the United States;
  3. Whereas, a sudden shift away from research materials only available in print not only threatens the integrity of diverse library collections, but also places a dedicated network of local vendors of scholarly and ephemeral research materials at risk of closure;
  4. Whereas, these regional vendors are important because of their expertise in specific regions and they provide access to necessary and unique materials for learning, teaching and research needs of library users that would be overlooked by larger vendors based outside of the region;
  5. Whereas, pioneering cooperative Open Access models such as SciELO and RedALyC have made scholarly journals from the region widely available for over two decades, yet a gap for monographs still exists;

 

Be it resolved, that Seminar for the Acquisition for Latin American Library Materials (SALALM), on behalf of its members:

  1. Urges libraries to continue acquiring print material through a network of regional vendors, often the only available sources, and thereby not limit diversity in scholarly collections.
  2. Encourages collaboration and further discussion with other organizations working with international collections at a national and international level, such as the Africana Librarians Council, Council on East Asian Libraries or the Middle East Librarians Association, among others.
  3. Advocates for continued and increased support for Open Access initiatives in Latin American and Caribbean countries through the Latin American Materials Project (LAMP), Latin Americanist Research Resources Project (LARRP), SALALM’s Award for Institutional Collaborative Initiatives, and other existing collaborative Open Access projects.

 

Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials (SALALM)

www.salalm.org

 

 


Upcoming Event: Job-Seeking in the Times of Covid-19

Job-Seeking in the Times of Covid-19

A conversation with Demographers of Color 

Friday, 12 June 2020

6-7:30pmEST

This virtual panel discussion features four Ph.D. demographers of color who have worked in and outside academia. Panelists will share their career and life experiences. Join us for a sincere discussion of pivots, resilience, and hope. We are organizing this panel in response to feedback gathered at the 1st ever member-organized Demographers of Color & Allies Reception in April.

Panelists:

 Gniesha Y. Dinwiddie (Ph.D. in Medical Sociology from University of Pennsylvania, Masters in African American Studies and Sociology from UCLA, B.A in Social Science from UC Irvine) is a Health Scientist at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, which is “the leading Federal agency charged with improving the safety and quality of America’s health care system.” Prior to joining AHRQ, Dr. Dinwiddie was a Scientific Review Officer at the National Institutes of Health, Associate Faculty at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Assistant Professor of African American Studies at the University of Maryland College Park.

Mao-Mei Liu (Ph.D. in Political and Social Sciences from Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Masters in Education and Political and Social Sciences from UPF, B.S. in Molecular Biophysics and Molecular Biochemistry from Yale) is Research Faculty in the Department of Demography at the University of California, Berkeley. Before UC Berkeley, Dr. Liu was NICHD Postdoctoral Fellow at Brown University’s Population Studies and Training Center. Before and during graduate school, Dr Liu worked as a community organizer for the Greater Four Corners Action Coalition in Dorchester and SEIU in Oakland, K-12 teacher in Barcelona and translator/interpreter in the Barcelona area.

 Eddie Telles (Ph.D. in Sociology from UT Austin, Masters in Urban Planning from UCLA, B.A. in Anthropology from Stanford) is Distinguished Professor of Sociology, University of California, Santa Barbara. Before UC Santa Barbara, Dr. Telles was a Professor of Sociology at Princeton and UCLA. Before joining academia, he worked as ESL instructor, community organizer, research director of Californios for Fair Representation and grants management specialist

Monique B. Williams (Ph.D. and M. A. in Demography from the University of Pennsylvania, B.A. in Urban Studies from Vanderbilt) is an Independent Consultant. Her company is called MBW Statistical Consulting. She advises C-suite executives and senior leaders of large-scale, federally-funded operations on data governance and providing services to customers. Before owning her own company full-time, Dr. Williams worked as a Statistician for the U.S. Census, a Program Officer for the National Academies, and a Senior Statistician for the U. S. Government Accountability Office.

Moderator: Associate Director of the University of Colorado Population Center and Professor at the Population Program and the Geography Department of the University of Colorado at Boulder Fernando Riosmena (Ph.D. in Demography from the University of Pennsylvania, M.A. in Demography from the University of Pennsylvania, Licenciado en Mercadotecnia from ITESM Guadalajara). Before Boulder, Dr. Riosmena was a Research Associate at the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Center for Demography and Ecology.

Register here. A confirmation email with meeting info will be sent post-registration.

This event is hosted by the Demographers of Color & Allies organizing committee (organizers include Asad L. Asad, Christina Cross, René D. Flores, Vicki Fung, Gabriela Sanchez-Soto, Gniesha Dinwiddie, Nadia Flores, Yana Kucheva, Mao-Mei Liu, Glenn Loury, Cecilia Menjívar, Emilio Parrado, Juan Pedroza, Ndola Prata, Fernando Riosmena, Eddie Telles, Monique Williams)

Please Save-The-Date for the last two DOC Job-seeking in Times of Covid-19 Conversations this summer 2020: Higher Ed on Friday, July 10th, 6-7:30pmEST and Real World/beyond Higher-Ed Friday, August 14th, 6-7:30 pm EST

——————–

Source: Ann Glusker, Librarian for Sociology, UC Berkeley Library


CRL-Global Press Archive Alliance Makes First In-Copyright Collection Available

CRL Announcement (Source: Judy Alspach, email dated 20 May 2020)

CRL and East View Information Services have launched the first in-copyright collection of titles digitized under the Global Press Archive (GPA) CRL Charter Alliance. Complementing the collection of Middle East and North African Newspapers released in January 2020, the new in-copyright collection of Middle East Newspapers will be available to all CRL members and those NERL institutions supporting the Alliance.

The in-copyright collection of Middle East Newspapers will ultimately include five important titles from the region:

  • al-Jumhūrīyah (Cairo, Egypt) (الجمهورية), a state-owned paper covering the years 1962–1990;
  • Filasṭīn (Jaffa, Tel Aviv, Israel) (فلسطين), an Arabic-language Palestinian newspaper (1956–1967);
  • al-Dustūr (Amman, Jordan) (الدستور), a successor to Filasṭīn and al-Manar following the Six Day War (1967–2000);
  • al-Riyadh (الرياض), a pro-government independent paper published in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia (1969–1996);
  • al-Akhbar (Beirut, Lebanon) (الاخبار), a contemporary “progressive” newspaper still in publication in Lebanon (2006–2019).

Titles for this collection were assessed and validated by MEMP members who volunteered to act as a selection group. CRL and the GPA Advisory Committee express their thanks to MEMP for its expert evaluation. In-copyright titles will live alongside the open access MENA titles at the link above. In-copyright titles will display a “lock” symbol to users outside IP authentication – CRL members & patrons will need to access via IP authentication (i.e. proxy) to see these titles. Non-CRL members may inquire about access directly with East View.

An announcement about this collection launch is available on CRL’s website at https://www.crl.edu/news/global-press-archive-alliance-makes-first-copyright-collection-available


125th anniversary of death of José Martí-the Cuban Intellectual, Author and Revolutionary!

JOSÉ MARTÍ – Serie Maestros de América Latina (Fair Academic Use Only, Source: UNIPE, Argentina)

Each nation-state has its own heroes whose actions often contribute to the narrative of mythopoetics of what it means to be a nation. Sometimes, songs are sung in their honor and monuments jut up like totems, arches, and pyramids of the antiquities. While the foundational myths and narratives often remain magical, the real actions of these enlightened individuals lead to the achievement of something larger.  José Martí is one such shining example.

The Cuban poet, a revolutionary philosopher, and Latin American intellectual of his times José Martí died one hundred and twenty-five years ago during the Battle of Dos Ríos on May 19, 1895. He led fight against the Spanish. From the Library of Congress hosted narrative, one notes that he lived in New York from 1881 and 1895 and a curious statement summarizes the imperialist tendencies that this nation has existed as follows, “He wrote everything from a magazine for children (Edad de Oro) to poetry (Versos sencillos 1891), to essays on the nature of the United States which he admired for its energy and industry as well as its notable statesmen, particularly the framers of the Constitution. However, he denounced its imperialist attitude toward its southern neighbors.”

Below are some of the electronic books that one can read after authenticating using proxy or VPN.

For works by José Martí at UC Berkeley Library see here.

 


Open Access in Latin American and Caribbean Studies Digital Resources: Episode 3

This is a third episode of Open Access in Latin American and Caribbean Studies Digital Resources. Today, I want to introduce the readers to the Costa Rican Historical Newspapers that have been digitized by SINABI Costa Rica. SINABI (Sistema Nacional De Bibliotecas: Costa Rica) is a system of Costa Rican libraries.

SINABI’s Landing Page.

There are over 300 historical newspapers that have been digitized and ready to be used for research. These can be accessed here.

Periódicos of SINABI.

The site allows any user to download these as PDF files. For example, “Actualidades: bisemanario de la vida nacional.” This particular periodical was directed and edited by Francisco Soler and among his collaborators were Mario Sancho, Leonidas Pachecho, and Julián Marchena. It included political information. It began publication on December 4, 1916.

There isn’t evidence that the periodical is OCR’ed and can be cross-searched against the other digitized periodicals and newspapers. Nevertheless, Costa Rica’s 300 historical newspaper titles are available for academic research.

Actualidades, Issue 1. 1916.

 


	

Trial: Classic Brazilian Cinema Online (Brill) ends on June 6, 2020

Classic Brazilian Cinema Online

Classic Brazilian Cinema Online
Editor: Rafael de Luna Freire
Resource self-description: “A unique collection of digitized historical film magazines from the 1910s to the 1970s, providing students and researchers with easy access to rare and previously dispersed sources documenting the cinematographic history of the largest country in Latin America.”

If you now go to https://primarysources.brillonline.com/browse/classic-brazilian-cinema-online you will find you have complete access to the resource. Brazilian cinema gained international acclaim through the Cinema Novo of Glauber Rocha, Nelson Pereira dos Santos and other directors in the 1960s. Yet Brazil produced numerous films throughout its various regions since as early as 1896. Until now, a proper appreciation of early Brazilian cinema has been hampered by the loss of a significant number of the films, as well as a lack of available printed sources pertaining to Brazil’s movie industry.”

The trial will go on through June 6, 2020

Sources from the Cinemateca do Museu de Arte Moderna (MAM) in Rio de Janeiro; New York University Libraries; and four private collectors in Brazil
• Unique access to more than 60 magazines • Fan magazines, trade magazines, Cinema Novo magazines
• Covering the period 1913–1974 • Ca. 75,000 full-color images • Full-text search functionality

Fair Academic Use Only.
These images may be protected by the U. S. Copyright Law (Title 17, U.S.C).


Open Access in Latin American and Caribbean Studies Digital Resources: Episode 2

Here is the second episode of the Open Access Digital Resources. We present you with the digital library of Francophone Caribbean, Amazonia, and Guayanas (Bibliotheque Numerique Caraibe Amazonie Plateau Des Guyanes). The self-description can be translated as, “Manioc (Cassava) is a digital library specializing in the Caribbean, the Amazon, the Guyana Plateau and the regions or centers of interest linked to these territories. The site is an open-access collaborative project between the University of Antilles and the University of Guyana.” This digital library provides access to several key digital collections related to the region.


Readings for Cinco de Mayo!

The Battle of Puebla marked one of the most significant episodes in Mexican military history.
CC BY-SA 3.0

Cinco de Mayo represents a victory of David over the Goliath. The battle took place on 5 May 1862. Benito Juárez, then the President of Mexico suspended the debt payments to the Western creditors and the collecting nations menaced Mexico with the war and especially the French Empire that came to disagree with the decision invaded Mexico. Cinco de Mayo is one watershed event in the series of battles where the Mexican nation successfully fought against the French Imperialism and drove out the superior French forces defeated. The events on the French sides have been summarized in several books including in “Révélations sur l’intervention française au Mexique de 1866 à 1867, par F. de La Barreyrie,” and “Le Mexique au début du XXe siècle.” It is interesting to see the language that was used to justify the French invasion of Mexico. And also it intereting to see the societal discourse that was used in the proclamation of the French Emperor Napoleon the third. Does it remind us of some similar language in the recent history that is used by some in our own nation? Here are some of the archival documents that reflect the Mexican view.

Today, while some cherish the celebrations of mariachis, tacos, and margaritas on May 5th, the true meaning of the battle that took place on the Cinco de Mayo has evolved into a genuinely American Holiday. Below are books that one can read to reflect on this 5 de Mayo!

Finally, we leave you with a clip about La Batalla de Puebla by a well-known outcome Mexican historian, Paco Ignacio Taibo II.