Save the date: Documentary Screening: “Una Escuela llamada América”- September 17, 2021

The library invites you to attend a virtual documentary screening of “Una Escuela llamada América” and a conversation with the director Antonia Mardones Marshall, Ph.D. Candidate in Department of Sociology on Friday, September 17, 2021, from 3 pm to 5 pm.

This event is virtual, and all are welcome to attend with prior registration. This documentary screening event is co-sponsored by UC Berkeley Library, the Center for Latin American Studies, and Berkeley Interdisciplinary Migration Initiative.

Register at
ucberk.li/escuela-event


[Library Trial] Cuban Periodicals: Cultural Magazines Published by Casa de las Américas, 1960–2009

The Library has set up a thirty-day trial of Brill’s database of Cuban Periodicals. It might be accessed after authenticating here: http://ucberk.li/cubanperiodicals

or here: https://libproxy.berkeley.edu/login?qurl=https%3A%2F%2Fprimarysources.brillonline.com%2Fbrowse%2Fcuban-periodicals-cultural-magazines-published-by-casa-de-las-americas-1960-2009

Cuban Periodicals: Cultural Magazines Published by Casa de las Américas, 1960–2009

Cuban Periodicals: Cultural Magazines Published by Casa de las Américas, 1960–2009
Self-description:
This primary source collection gives access to the archives (1960–2009) of four cultural magazines published by Casa de las Américas in Havana, Cuba. It includes the highly influential journal Casa, the theater journal Conjunto, the music journal Boletín de Música, and, finally, Anales del Caribe, a journal about the rich artistic and literary production in the Caribbean.

New Latin American/ Latinx/ Chicanx Studies Database at UC Berkeley: Hispanic American Newspapers, 1808-1980

We are glad to announce the purchase of access to Readex’s Hispanic American Newspapers, 1808-1980 database at UC Berkeley. This collection represents the single largest compilation of Spanish-language newspapers printed in the U.S. during the 19th and 20th centuries. The database provides access to thousands of titles and includes both English and Spanish language materials. The currently registered students and faculty can access the database using your UCB credentials here: Hispanic American Newspapers, 1890-1980.

The title list of the newspapers that are included in this collection can be accessed here. There are forty-four titles that were published in California. Some titles have extensive runs while the others have only a single issue that can be accessed. The image below is used for demonstrative and educational purposes only.

 

Source: Cinema, 1 Feb. 1935, p. 1. Readex: Hispanic American Newspapers, infoweb.newsbank.com/apps/readex/doc?p=EANASP&docref=image/v2%3A11E0D8ECE2FAA6F1%40EANASP-11E89061E331F2E0%402427835-11E888FE0098D8E8%400. Accessed 21 June 2021.

4th Annual Nahuatl Conference at UCLA (Friday, June 4, 2021)

Usually, we do not post about what is happening at the other University of California campuses. However, this announcement piqued my interest as it deals with the Nahuatl language and history. One advantage the pandemic has offered us is to virtually attend the conferences instead of traveling at long distances from the comfort of one’s place. One of my faculty mentors was Dr. Kevin Terraciano at UCLA, and his works on the indigenous languages- especially Nahuatl are known all over the country. Please register here.

 


UC Berkeley Library’s Web Page of Task Force on Racial Justice Launched!

Today our University Librarian Professor Jeff MacKie-Mason, University Librarian, Chief Digital Scholarship Officer, Professor, School of Information and Professor of Economics, UC Berkeley Library made a formal announcement about the report by the Library’s Task Force for on Racial Justice.

The webpage can be accessed here: https://www.lib.berkeley.edu/about/racial-justice-task-force

The full charge of the Task Force can be accessed by clicking here.

Library Colleagues can access the report below.

“In spring 2020, the Task Force presented an initial report to Library Cabinet. This briefing includes a list of proposed recommendations and actionable strategies for improving the ways in which racism and discrimination can be addressed within the campus library system.

Read the report.”

The full statement can be read here by clicking on this text!

https://www.lib.berkeley.edu/about/racial-justice-task-force

 

Source: An email dated from the co-Chair Shannon Monroe on 5/25/21 announced the launch of this webpage.


UCB Library Event: Undaunted Archivists and Curators from the American South Speak!

Undaunted Archivists and Curators from the American South Speak!

Date: Tuesday, June 1, 2021

9:30-11 a.m. PDT
12:30-2 p.m. EDT,
10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. MDT,
11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. CDT

The registration link is below. The event is free, and all are invited to attend.

http://ucberk.li/3fm  


CRL Webinar-Radical Collaboration: Library Publisher Partnerships to Advance the Global Knowledge Commons

The CRL Webinar are available at the end of this post.

The Global Press Archive Charter Alliance is an initiative by East View Information Services and the Center for Research Libraries to develop a unique series of thematically designed collections to meet the priorities of the CRL members. 74 CRL (including UCB) and NERL libraries have committed $4.25 million to help launch the first three years of the project.

So far, we have access to Mexican Revolutionary Newspapers and Russian Imperial Newspapers as a part of this process.

Independent and Revolutionary Mexican Newspapers 

The Independent and Revolutionary Mexican Newspapers collection, with a preliminary release of 135,000 pages from 477 titles, will ultimately include approximately 1,000 titles from Mexico’s pre-independence, independence, and revolutionary periods (1807-1929).

Imperial Russian Newspapers 

The Imperial Russian Newspapers collection comprises out-of-copyright newspapers spanning the eighteenth, nineteenth, and early twentieth centuries, up to the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution. [1782-1918]

Webinar Recording is below:


Mexico and the conquest of Tenochtitlán (May 1521-2021)

The month of May this year marks the five-hundredth anniversary of the fall of Tenochtitlán (1521-2021). The tragedies that unfolded in the continent after the conquest are well documented. However, as far as the accounts of the fall of the Tenochtitlán are concerned, there are several different opinions and disagreements. What about the letters of Hernán Cortés? Here is the second letter from the WDL

Also on the archive.org, we see a digitized copy of JCB’s 1552 Francisco López de Gómara’s “La historia general de las Indias, y todo lo acaescido enellas dende que se ganaron hasta agora. ; y La conquista de Mexico, y dela Nueua España.
 

 

What are some of the primary sources that are now open access and can be used to inform us about the events that unfolded five hundred years ago? One such source is Bernal Díaz del Castillo’s is work, Historia verdadera de la conquista de la Nueva España.” On the right, one sees a title page of the 1632 imprint of the same that is available in Google Books.

While some often use paintings from the late 17th century to depict and describe the fall of the capital of the Aztecs, these are often functions of the artistic license, and in some cases, we do not know who could have painted them.

 

The painting, such as the one below, is one example from the Library of Congress’ collection. Can images narrate the nuanced past accurately? These images are from the LOC’s exhibition and also in Wikimedia commons.

But where are the voices of those who were conquered but not vanquished? Can we rely on Codex Florentino as one perhaps contested source? The WDL (from the collection of Biblioteca Medicea-Laurenziana) has made it available for the readers to judge the process that began with the conquest of Tenochtitlán. The LOC’s description reads, “Historia General de las Cosas de Nueva España” (General History of the Things of New Spain), as the Florentine Codex is formally known, is an encyclopedic work about the people and culture of central Mexico compiled over a period of 30 years by Fray Bernardino de Sahagún (1499–1590), a Franciscan missionary who arrived in Mexico in 1529, eight years after completion of the Spanish conquest by Hernan Cortés. The text is in Spanish and Nahuatl, the language of the Aztecs. Its 12 books, richly illustrated by indigenous artists, cover the Aztec religion and calendar, economic and social life, Aztec history and mythology, the use of plants and animals and the Spanish conquest as seen through the eyes of the native Mexicans.”

I leave you with unfinished thoughts. Can a manuscript tell the story? See for yourself by watching Getty Researcher Institute’s five-part series. And with Taibo’s, “¿Historia para qué?”I love Paco Ignacio Taibo II’s argument about who we are? And his questioning of sanitization history where Cortes and Cuauhtemōc are dancing La Sandunga.


Call for Proposals: LAUC-B 2021 Conference Oct 5-6 2021 – Reimagining Libraries Through Critical Library Practices, October 5-6, 2021- Call for Proposals Due June 15, 2021

The Librarian’s Association of the University of California, Berkeley (LAUC-B) invites you to submit a proposal for the 2021 conference, Reimagining Libraries Through Critical Library Practices, an online conference that will take place Tuesday, October 5 to Wednesday, October 6, 10 am to 3 pm PST.

Proposals are due Tuesday, June 15, 2021, and can be submitted using this form. We will notify successful applicants by July 15, 2021.

For further conference information and the full call for proposals, please visit LAUC-B 2021 Conference Website

Call for proposals brief version: Library work is embedded in and inherently tied to socio-political circumstances. We welcome proposals that emphasize and examine critical librarianship through the lens of social justice, diversity, equity, inclusion, and anti-racist work.

We invite proposals from diverse voices addressing critical library practices including:

  • Community Archives, Inclusion, and Underrepresented Communities
  • Critical Library Pedagogy
  • Developing standards for critical librarianship in Digital Literacy and Digital Scholarship
  • Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
  • Open Access
  • Social Justice and Anti-racist Work
  • The theory and practice of critical library work that includes all library professionals

All proposal abstracts should be no more than 300 words and indicate the type of session you are proposing. We will be holding the following session formats:

  • Lightning Talks (5-7 minute presentations)
  • 20-minute individual presentations
  • 50-minute panel
  • Poster session

We encourage proposals for virtual presentations that represent all aspects of library work (including technical services, access services, interlibrary loan, reference, instruction, library administration, technology, youth services, and more) and all library workers (including library students, paraprofessionals, and members of underrepresented groups).

For further conference information, please visit here.

Please submit your proposal by Tuesday, June 15, 2021. Successful applicants will be notified by Thursday, July 15, 2021.

If you have any questions, please contact us through the website or at laucbconfinfo@lists.berkeley.edu

Sincerely,

LAUC-B 2021 Conference Committee:

Paromita B. (UCLA)
Kelsey B. (UCI)
Kristina B. (UCB)
Lia F. (UCSD)
Ann G. (UCB)
Shannon K. (UCB)
Corliss L. (UCB)
Natalie M. (UCI)
Jin M. (UCSD)
Erica N. (UCB)
Liladhar P. (UCB)
Scott P (UCB)
Christina V. (UCB)