Cinco de Mayo (El Día de la Batalla de Puebla) through books

Each year, Cinco de Mayo (El Día de la Batalla de Puebla)  is celebrated in the United States and Mexico to commemorate the victory of Mexico over the invading imperial French forces at the Battle of Puebla. While today, many “Western” powers adhere to the democratic principles of governance, in the 19th century, most of them practiced imperialism without much guilt. We all know that the self-ascribed civilizing missions of these Western European and Russian Imperial forces, including our democratic American expeditionary force in the Phillippines and other places, remain well-documented in the books and news media of the time. After all, David did overpower Goliath; such was the case for ill-equipped Mexican forces who triumphed over better-equipped French forces. The battle took place 160 years ago, on May 5, 1862, outside of Puebla. Here are some books that would refresh our memories about the significance of Cinco de Mayo.

Image Source: 5th May 1862. Depictions of the battle showing Mexican cavalry overwhelming the French troops below the fort at Loreto. Scene recreated by Francisco P. Miranda. Oil on canvas, 1872.

Some subject designations like the one below will help us quickly locate the books from our collections.

European Intervention in Mexico (1861-1867)
Mexico — History — European intervention, 1861-1867
France — Foreign relations — Mexico
Mexico — Foreign relations — France
Mexico — Foreign relations — 1861-1867
France — History — Second Empire, 1852-1870

And below are a few books that might be of interest to our readers.

Payno, Manuel. México y sus cuestiones financieras con la Inglaterra, la España y la Francia : memoria. México: Secrétaria de Hacienda y Crédito Público, 1982. Print.

Bourdeille, Christian. “L’intervention française au Mexique (1862-1867) : un conflit inattendu, une amitié naissante : actes du colloque.” Paris: Les Éditions du Cerf, 2018. Print.

Carvajal, Jose M. de J., and Gaspar Sánchez Ochoa. Contratos hechos en los Estados Unidos por los comisionados del gobierno de Mexico durante los años de 1865 y 1866. Mexico: Imp. del Gobierno en Palacio, 1868. Print.

Cluseret, G. Mexico, and the Solidarity of Nations. New York: Blackwell, 1866. Print.

Chevalier, Michel. L’expédition du Mexique. Paris: E. Dentu, 1862. Print.

Chandler, Zachariah, and James Warren Nye. Mexico. Speeches of Hon. Z. Chandler, of Michigan, and Hon. James W. Nye, of Nevada, in the U.S. Senate, July 12, 1867, on Maximilian’s Decree Ordering the Execution of the Liberal Prisoners … Washington?: Great Republic Print, 1867. Print.

And here is a clip that one might watch to understand further the complex nature of European involvement in Mexican affairs.

 


New UN Archives Geneva Platform

The United Nations Library & Archives Geneva is pleased to announce the new UN Archives Geneva Platform launch. This new online platform makes it easier to navigate and search approximately ten linear kilometers of archives managed by the UN Library & Archives Geneva, including different fonds such as 19th-century peace movements, the League of Nations, UN Geneva, and additional UN entities based in Geneva.

Thanks to the LONTAD project, the platform provides access to over 10 million digitized pages of the League of Nations archives. By 2022, the entirety of the archives of the League of Nations will be available online (including photographs and maps).

The launch of the platform enables researchers to search exceptional primary sources. It also opens new ways of conducting research in the archives. More information is available here.

With the new platform, we are now offering free tailored online presentations and trainings for researchers and students to explain the structure of the UN archives in Geneva, how the platform works, the material available online and the documents which are still not digitized but available for consultation in site. These presentations can be provided for faculty meetings, seminars and courses, or whatever setting is desirable. Catering to your needs, our specialists can present the wealth of archival documents – digitized and physical – available at the UN Library & Archives Geneva, explain how to use the platform, and show the work of the Institutional Memory Section. For further information, do not hesitate to contact us: https://ask.unog.ch/archives

Contact Info:

Pierre-Etienne Bourneuf, UN Library & Archives Geneva

Palais des Nations, 8-14 Avenue de la Paix, 1211 Genève

Source: Email-Guy Burak-Mela-NYU 04/22/2022

Voices from Ukraine: Ukrainian librarians in the struggle against Russian invasion!

We invite you to join us for a Zoom-based event where librarians across Ukraine will speak to us about their daily lives, work, and heroic efforts to preserve their collections and provide services during the war. Russia’s ongoing war against Ukraine is a tragedy of cultural and humanitarian dimensions. The organizing committee members think it is vital to hear from our brave colleagues in Ukraine.

Date: April 6, 2022

Time: 9 am PST/ 10 am MST/ 11 am CST/ 12 noon EST/ 7 pm Kyiv

Duration: 90 minutes

Registration Link: http://ucberk.li/3o9

Organizers: The Coalition of Slavic Librarians for Peace (CSLP): Olha Alkesic (Ukrainian Research Institute at Harvard University), Ksenya Kiebuzinski (University of Toronto), Liladhar R. Pendse (University of California-Berkeley) and George Andrew Spencer (University of Wisconsin-Madison)


Ukraine: Language, Literature & Religion Virtual Event @UC Berkeley Library

Ukraine: Language, Literature & Religion
When: Thursday, April 14, 2022
Time is shown below:
12:30 pm to 2 pm PST
2:30 pm to 4 pm CST
3:30 pm to 5 pm EST
Registration: http://ucberk.li/3nX
First, log in to your institutional or personal zoom accounts and then register for the event.
This event is a non-political event, and all are welcome to attend with prior registration.

 


Latinx Research Center (LRC) Faculty-Mentored Undergraduate Research Fellowship

 

Latinx Research Center (LRC) Faculty-Mentored Undergraduate Research Fellowship

LRC is excited to launch the LRC Faculty-Mentored Undergraduate Research Fellowship program, pairing outstanding faculty with outstanding undergraduate students to advance research in US Latinx Studies.

The LRC has been awarded $550K by the Office of Financial Aid & Scholarships for the next 5 years to support this program. Every year, eleven $10K awards will be made in the liberal arts, and across the professional schools and the museum, to support faculty-mentored undergraduate research fellows throughout a full year: two semesters and a summer. The first round of awards will begin as early as Spring 2022. However, research can also begin in the summer of 2022. The application period has been extended to February 16th. Awards for applications that met the original January 31st deadline will be announced on Monday, February 7th; awards for applications received by February 16th will be announced on February 23rd. The award jury will consist of senior humanities and social sciences professors and will be distributed equitably across disciplines.

Applications should be submitted by faculty, who will nominate an outstanding undergraduate student that has agreed to work with them. Faculty in earlier stages of their career will be favored, however, all faculty are encouraged to apply. Selected student fellows will receive the $10K award throughout the course of a year, and will work closely with their faculty mentor, assisting in research, and developing their research skills, critical thinking, and intellectual creativity. Student fellows and mentors will be expected to meet weekly or biweekly, and to discuss their research at the LRC at the end of the award cycle. As an outcome of this mentored research fellowship, under the guidance of their faculty mentors, students will develop their own honors or capstone thesis, art practice, or other projects.

To apply, please visit https://forms.gle/H4hy1oRJhm39G1KT9.

For questions, email latinxresearch@berkeley.edu.


War is not an answer: Ukraine 2022

In the face of unfolding horrendous tragedy in Ukraine, I was remembering my “families and friends” in Kyiv, Minsk, and Moscow. There was this Soviet saying- Znanie Sila (Knowledge is power). In face of this tragedy, as a librarian, I was thinking of doing my part by presenting the readers of this blog with some choices on information sources.
I have been thinking about presenting some items from UC Berkeley Library’s collections that speak to Ukraine’s rich yet nuanced history. All histories are nuanced, and I am trying to avoid my implicit biases and opinions about the current tragedy unfolding in Ukraine. Ukraine was never a state until the Bolsheviks created the Ukrainian SSR is as problematic as cutting the long-standing intertwining of Russo-Ukrainian histories. However, the post-Soviet Ukraine is an independent modern European nation-state whose sovereignty and freedom to chart its destiny matter to humanity.

I remember today Gogol‘s Cтрашная месть or A Terrible Vengeance. This story is a part of a larger collection with the title: Vechera na khutori︠e︡ bliz Dikanʹki Mirgorod

Please think a minute about Ivane and Petro! And I refrain from discussing the modern-day Oligarchs from both sides.

History of UkraineRus

Hrushevsʹkyĭ, Mykhaĭlo, 1866-1934, author.; Грушевський, Михайло, 1866-1934, author.; Pasicznyk, Uliana M., editor.; Poppe, Andrzej, editor.; Sysyn, Frank E., editor.; Frost, Robert, editor.; Fedoruk, I︠A︡roslav, editor.; Raffensperger, Christian, editor.; Skorupsky, Marta, translator.; Wynnyckyj, Andriy, translator.; Press, Ian, 1947- translator.
1997-2021

Below are some subject-based links that will allow you to browse our catalog for additional resources on Ukraine.

Here is an article about some classics of Ukrainian Literature that might provide some cursory information about the rich literary tradition of Ukraine. Have you read Lesya Ukrainka‘s works or Serhii Plokhii’s contemporary works? War is not an answer!


Black History Month Celebration at UC Berkeley Library!

Please join us for a virtual Black History Month Celebration at UC Berkeley Library! The event is planned for Wednesday, February 23, 2022, from 11:30 am until 1 pm PST / 2:30 pm to 4 pm EST on Zoom.

Webinar Registration: ucberk.li/black-history-month-2022-event
Free and Open to all with prior registration. Please remember to authenticate by signing into your institutional or individual zoom accounts first before trying to register for the event.

I want to thank our Vice Chancellor for the Division of Equity & Inclusion,  Dania Matos, who found time out of her hectic schedule to provide the opening remarks. We look forward to welcoming everyone. Please be so kind as to share information about this event with your respective communities of practice.

 


Trial of Hispanic Life in America (Readex) Database(ends on March 15, 2022)

The library has opted for a thirty-day trial of Hispanic Life in America: a Readex Database. The trial is good through March 15, 2022.

The database trial can be accessed here after authenticating using either the VPN or proxy.

Readex provides the following information on the database:

This database covers three time periods: Series 1: 1704-1942 | Series 2: 1943-2009 | Series 3: 2010-today

  • Comprehensive coverage of the Hispanic American experience from the early 18th century to the present day
  • Sourced from more than 17,000 publications, including 700 Spanish-language newspapers and periodicals
  • An easy-to-use online resource—updated daily with new material—that illuminates centuries of Hispanic history, culture, and daily life.

Source: https://www.readex.com/products/hispanic-life-america#summary


Holocaust Remembrance Day 2022

Yesterday was Holocaust (Shoah) Remembrance Day, and today at sundown, we will have the beginning of Jewish Shabbat. So, first of all, to my readers of this blog who follow the Jewish faith, Shabbat Shalom. I fondly remember my teacher in Jewish Studies, Professor Zev Garber of Los Angeles Valley College, who helped me understand the complexities of Jewish American Literature when I was a “new” and yet unestablished “immigrant from the Indian sub-continent” in the United States. I had no idea that the West had coined “South Asia” and that campus identity politics existed across North America. I had no idea about the words like “being canceled” and sent to an exile in Academic Siberia. But I knew of Babii (Babyn) Yar and the Genocide of innocent Jews and others during WW II. And leave you with three recent books that interrogate the Holocaust. In memoriam to the victims of Holocaust/Shoah. Also, reminder, that the library with the gracious funding assistance from our AUL Joanne Newyear-Ramirez was successful in purchasing access to USC Shoah Foundation Visual History Archive 

Lastly, I leave you to reflect on an article by Larisa Maliukova (Лариса Малюкова) in a Russian Newspaper: Novaya Gazeta with the title: Сергей Лозница: «Война — всегда отвратительный способ нерешения проблемы»

And two clips of Sergei Loznitsa’s 2021 documentary film: Voina-vsegda otvratitel’nyi sposob neresheniia problemy (translation: War- always a poisonous method (for) a failure to resolve problems.

And the second clip is below: