Digital Humanities Fair 2020 – Online

DH Fair 2020

Join us for the 2020 Digital Humanities Fair — fully online! We are excited to share with you a rich line-up of lectures, workshops, and the DH Fair Poster Session during the week of April 13-16, including lectures by Tom White of the Victoria University of Wellington School of Design and Christiane Paul of the Sheila C. Johnson Design Center, The New School and the Whitney Museum of American Art.

The DH Fair Poster Session will feature Professor James Smithies, Director of King’s Digital Lab in London, speaking on the topic of Applying AI to storytelling. Then, learn about recent and current Digital Humanities work at UC Berkeley and beyond through our virtual poster session. The Poster Session will take place on Tuesday, April 14th from 1:00-3:30pm and requires advance registration. If you have a project to share, whether fully polished or a work in progress, we invite you to propose it!

The DH Fair is open to all. Some events will be publicly streamed, and others require advanced registration. Visit the website for details. See you then!

Thank you to our sponsors:
Arts Research Center
Berkeley Center for New Media
DH Working Group (Townsend Center)
D-Lab
The Library
V-Lab


Workshop: HTML/CSS Toolkit for Digital Projects

Digital Publishing Workshop Series

HTML/CSS Toolkit for Digital Projects
Wednesday, April 15, 11:10am-12:30pm
Online

If you’ve tinkered in WordPress, Google Sites, or other web publishing tools, chances are you’ve wanted more control over the placement and appearance of your content. With a little HTML and CSS under your belt, you’ll know how to edit “under the hood” so you can place an image exactly where you want it, customize the formatting of text, or troubleshoot copy & paste issues. By the end of this workshop, interested learners will be well prepared for a deeper dive into the world of web design. Please bring a laptop if possible. Register at bit.ly/dp-berk

Upcoming Workshops in this Series 2020:

  • By Design: Graphics & Images Basics (Spring 2020)
  • Publish Digital Books & Open Educational Resources with Pressbooks (Fall 2020)

Please see bit.ly/dp-berk for details.


Workshop: Text Data Mining and Publishing

Digital Publishing Workshop Series

Text Data Mining and Publishing
Thursday, March 12, 11:10am-12:30pm
D-Lab, 350 Barrows Hall

If you are working on a computational text analysis project and have wondered how to legally acquire, use, and publish text and data, this workshop is for you! We will teach you 5 legal literacies (copyright, contracts, privacy, ethics, and special use cases) that will empower you to make well-informed decisions about compiling, using, and sharing your corpus. By the end of this workshop, and with a useful checklist in hand, you will be able to confidently design lawful text analysis projects or be well positioned to help others design such projects. Register at bit.ly/dp-berk

Upcoming Workshops in this Series 2020:

  • HTML/CSS Toolkit for Digital Projects
  • By Design: Graphics & Images Basics
  • Publish Digital Books & Open Educational Resources with Pressbooks

Please see bit.ly/dp-berk for details.


Building Legal Literacies for Text Data Mining: Call for Participants

LLTDMJoin the Building Legal Literacies for Text Data Mining (Building LLTDM) Institute June 23-26, 2020 on the UC Berkeley campus to learn how to confidently navigate United States law, policy, ethics, and risk within digital humanities text data mining projects — so that participants can more easily engage in this type of research and contribute to the advancement of knowledge.

The program will consist of how law and policy matters pertain to text data mining research, such as copyright, privacy, and ethics. It will also help participants integrate workflows for these law and policy issues into their text data mining research and professional support, practice sharing these new tools through authentic consultation exercises, and develop communities of practice to promote cross-institutional outreach about the digital humanities text data mining legal landscape.

The Institute supports 32 participants based in the United States — 16 digital humanities researchers and 16 digital humanities professionals. Digital humanities professionals are people like librarians, consultants, and other institutional staff who conduct digital humanities text data mining or aid researchers in their text data mining research. Participation from pairs of participants is encouraged (e.g. one digital humanities researcher and one professional affiliated with that same institution, organization, or digital humanities project). The Institute will be taught by a combination of experienced legal scholars, digital humanities professionals, librarians, faculty, and researchers — all of whom are immersed in the Institute’s subject literacies and workflows.

To apply, email to contact-building-lltdm@googlegroups.com a current CV and a 2 page letter of interest addressing your experience with or interest in the intersection of text data mining in digital humanities research and the law as well as your goals for how to apply the knowledge taken from the program. Applications are due December 20, 2019 by 5 p.m. PST. Selection notifications will go out in February 2020.

Visit the Building LLTDM website for more information.


Workshop: The Long Haul: Best Practices for Making Your Digital Project Last

Digital Publishing Workshop Series

You’ve invested a lot of work in creating a digital project, but how do you ensure it has staying power? We’ll look at choices you can make at the beginning of project development to influence sustainability, best practices for documentation and asset management, and how to sunset your project in a way that ensures long-term access for future researchers. Register at bit.ly/dp-berk

Upcoming Workshops in this Series 2019-2020:

  • Check back in Spring!

Please see bit.ly/dp-berk for details.


Publish your scholarship like a pro!

Woman wearing gold watch, sitting at table, typing on a Microsoft Surface notebook
Photograph by Women of Color in Tech, CC-BY 2.0.

We’re more than a month into the fall semester, and if you’re a graduate student or postdoc you’ve probably been thinking about some of the milestones on your horizon, from filing your thesis or dissertation to pitching your first book project or looking for a job.

While we can’t write your dissertation or submit your job application for you, the Library can help in other ways! We are collaborating with GradPro to offer a series of professional development workshops for grad students, postdocs, and other early career scholars to guide you through important decisions and tasks in the research and publishing process, from preparing your dissertation to building a global audience for your work.

  • October 22: Copyright and Your Dissertation
  • October 23: From Dissertation to Book: Navigating the Publication Process
  • October 25: Managing and Maximizing Your Scholarly Impact

These sessions are focused on helping early career researchers develop real-world scholarly publishing skills and apply this expertise to a more open, networked, and interdisciplinary publishing environment.

These workshops are also taking place during Open Access Week 2019, an annual global effort to bring attention to Open Access around the world and highlight how the free, immediate, online availability of scholarship can remove barriers to information, support emerging scholarship, and foster the spread of knowledge and innovation.

Below is the list of next week’s workshop offerings. Join us for one workshop or all three! Each session will take place at the Graduate Professional Development Center, 309 Sproul Hall. Please RSVP at the links below.

Light refreshments will be served at all workshops.

If you have any questions about these workshops, please get in touch with schol-comm@berkeley.edu. And if you can’t make it to a workshop but still need help with your publishing, we are always here for you!

 

Copyright and Your Dissertation

Workshop | October 22 | 1-2:30 p.m. | 309 Sproul Hall

This workshop will provide you with a practical workflow for navigating copyright questions and legal considerations for your dissertation or thesis. Whether you’re just starting to write or you’re getting ready to file, you can use this workflow to figure out what you can use, what rights you have, and what it means to share your dissertation online.

RSVP (Copyright)

 

From Dissertation to Book: Navigating the Publication Process

Panel Discussion | October 23 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 309 Sproul Hall

Hear from a panel of experts – an acquisitions editor, a first-time book author, and an author rights expert – about the process of turning your dissertation into a book. You’ll come away from this panel discussion with practical advice about revising your dissertation, writing a book proposal, approaching editors, signing your first contract, and navigating the peer review and publication process.

RSVP (Book)

 

Managing and Maximizing Your Scholarly Impact

Workshop | October 25 | 1-2:30 p.m. | 309 Sproul Hall

This workshop will provide you with practical strategies and tips for promoting your scholarship, increasing your citations, and monitoring your success. You’ll also learn how to understand metrics, use scholarly networking tools, evaluate journals and publishing options, and take advantage of funding opportunities for Open Access scholarship.

RSVP (Impact)


Workshop: Publish Digital Books & Open Educational Resources with Pressbooks

Digital Publishing Workshop Series

If you’re looking to self-publish work of any length and want an easy-to-use tool that offers a high degree of customization, allows flexibility with publishing formats (EPUB, MOBI, PDF), and provides web-hosting options, Pressbooks may be great for you. Pressbooks is often the tool of choice for academics creating digital books, open textbooks, and open educational resources, since you can license your materials for reuse however you desire. Learn why and how to use Pressbooks for publishing your original books or course materials. You’ll leave the workshop with a project already under way! Register at bit.ly/dp-berk

Upcoming Workshops in this Series 2019-2020:

  • The Long Haul: Best Practices for Making Your Digital Project Last

Please see bit.ly/dp-berk for details.


New Resource for Digital Scholarship: Gale Digital Scholar Lab

Interested in computational text analysis, but don’t have coding experience? Or perhaps you’ve already written your own Python scripts, but you’re on the lookout for sources to build your text corpus. The Gale Digital Scholar Lab, new to the Library, offers solutions for digital humanities and digital scholarship researchers regardless of your level of technical expertise.

Create Visualizations and Run Computational Analyses in Your Web Browser
The Gale Digital Scholar Lab offers six analysis tools through which you can analyze Gale materials with just a few clicks:

  • “Clustering” analyzes similar words across documents.
  • “Named entity recognition” extracts proper and common nouns and groups them by types such as people, organizations, or dates.
  • “Ngram” looks at the frequency of various terms or phrases.
  • “Parts of speech tagger” considers how authors’ use of speech varies over time.
  • “Sentiment analysis” tallies the positive or negative words in each document to produce a sentiment value.
  • “Topic modeling” collects terms that frequently co-occur across a group of documents.

Gale Digital Scholar Lab

 

Download Plain-Text Files to Run Your Own Analyses
You can download up to 1000 documents at a time as plain-text files for your personal use. You can run your own analyses on this data and combine it with other text sources to build custom text corpora.

What Content Is Available?
The Gale Digital Scholar Lab includes 160 million pages of Gale Primary Sources content from the following primary source digital archives:

17th and 18th Century Burney Collection
American Civil Liberties Union Papers, 1912-1990
American Fiction
Archives Unbound
Archives of Sexuality & Gender
British Library Newspapers
The Economist Historical Archive
Eighteenth Century Collections Online
Indigenous Peoples: North America
The Making of Modern Law: Foreign Primary Sources
The Making of Modern Law: Foreign, Comparative, and International Law, 1600-1926
The Making of Modern Law: Legal Treatises, 1800-1926
The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources
The Making of Modern Law: Trials, 1600-1926
The Making of the Modern World
Nineteenth Century Collections Online
Nineteenth Century U.S. Newspapers
Sabin Americana, 1500-1926
The Sunday Times Digital Archive
The Times Digital Archive
The Times Literary Supplement Historical Archive
U.S. Declassified Documents Online

Additional Features

  • View scans of original documents side-by-side with OCR plain text
  • Work iteratively with your content set to refine your results
  • Easily clean your data right in the Gale Digital Scholar Lab interface and create custom text-cleaning templates
  • Work with materials and tools in other languages

How to Get Started

  • Visit the Gale Digital Scholar Lab
  • Log in with your Google or Microsoft OneDrive credentials (a personal account is needed so you can create and save personalized datasets)
  • Create your dataset by searching through the materials in the Lab.
  • Run analyses on your dataset right in the web browser and get immediate results, or download your dataset to your computer to run your own scripts.

Workshop: Copyright and Fair Use for Digital Projects

Digital Publishing Workshop Series

This training will help you navigate the copyright, fair use, and usage rights of including third-party content in your digital project. Whether you seek to embed video from other sources for analysis, post material you scanned from a visit to the archives, add images, upload documents, or more, understanding the basics of copyright and discovering a workflow for answering copyright-related digital scholarship questions will make you more confident in your publication. We will also provide an overview of your intellectual property rights as a creator and ways to license your own work. Register at bit.ly/dp-berk

Upcoming Workshops in this Series 2019-2020:

  • Publish Digital Books & Open Educational Resources with Pressbooks
  • The Long Haul: Best Practices for Making Your Digital Project Last

Please see bit.ly/dp-berk for details.


Universitas Linguarum

The Languages of Berkeley: An Online Exhibition

The Languages of Berkeley

Linguarum enim inscitia disciplinas universas aut exstinxit, aut depravavit…

For ignorance of languages either marred or abolished the world of learning….

—Erasmus, 1529, De pueris statim ac liberaliter instituendis. Opera I, 377

Berkeley’s celebration of languages in the Library could not come at a better moment. We are living in a time when many Americans are smugly self-satisfied about speaking English Only, when our government has waged an ugly war against immigrants, when linguistic and cultural otherness is too often construed as a threat, and when the world of learning is narrowing to a point where it may again be falling on unfortunate times.

The national trends are clear. A recent report from the Modern Language Association shows that 651 foreign language programs in American colleges and universities were lost between 2013 and 2016. And these are not all “less commonly taught” languages: according to the MLA report, during the 2013-16 period, net losses included 129 French programs, 118 Spanish programs, 86 German programs, and 56 Italian programs. Since 2009, overall foreign language enrollments have declined by 15.3 percent nationally. A recent Pew Research Center study showed that only 20% of American K-12 students study a foreign language (as compared to 92% in Europe).

Berkeley is not immune to decreases in language enrollments, but our programs remain unusually strong and have been staunchly supported by the Berkeley administration. In any given year, between 50 and 60 languages are taught on campus, and this remarkable breadth reflects the diversity of the State of California and the backgrounds and research interests of our students and faculty. California leads the nation in linguistic diversity: 42% of Californians speak a language other than English in their homes (as of 2016), and California has more than a hundred indigenous languages. Not surprisingly, this year’s incoming students speak more than 20 languages.

Globalization is ostensibly a strong impetus for language study — and it is in most parts of the world, where knowledge of English and other major languages is viewed as a fundamental necessity for participation in the global economy. However, in the U.S., it seems that globalization has had the opposite effect, leading many Americans to adopt a complacent attitude: why study other languages when so much of the world revolves around English?

Berkeley resists such complacency. We recognize that knowing other languages opens up fresh perspectives on the world, on our relationships with others, on our own language and culture, on the various disciplines we study, and on the problems we strive to solve. Indeed, so many of the challenges we face today are global in nature and can only be approached through the multiplicity of perspectives that come with international cooperation and collaboration. While English may allow for broad sharing of information, the reality is that we will never fully understand the nuances of other peoples’ perspectives if we don’t speak their language. Furthermore, because language, thought, and identity are so intimately intertwined, acquiring languages other than our mother tongue enriches our very being, allowing us to take on new identities, adopt new attitudes and beliefs, develop greater cognitive flexibility, and understand ourselves and our culture in a new light. Seeing the world through the lens of another language and culture also fosters empathy, which is essential to counter increasingly pervasive waves of ethno-nationalism.

Our university library reflects this awareness that languages nourish our imagination, enhance our creativity, and broaden and deepen our understanding of worlds past and present. More than one third of the 13 million volumes in UC Berkeley’s collection are in languages other than English. Remembering that the word university derives from the Latin universitas, signifying both universality and community, let us celebrate together the rich diversity of the Library’s holdings and of languages on the Berkeley campus.

Rick Kern,
Professor, Department of French
Director, Berkeley Language Center

The Languages of Berkeley [fan]
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The Languages of Berkeley is a dynamic online sequential exhibition celebrating the diversity of languages that have advanced research, teaching and learning at the University of California, Berkeley. It is made possible with support from the UC Berkeley Library and is co-sponsored by the Berkeley Language Center (BLC).

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