Trial access: Refugees, Relief, and Resettlement: Forced Migration and World War II

Until March 31, the Library has trial access to Refugees, Relief, and Resettlement: Forced Migration and World War II, which “chronicles the plight of refugees and displaced persons across Europe, North Africa, and Asia from 1935 to 1950, bringing together over 650,000 pages of pamphlets, ephemera, government documents, relief organization publications, and refugee reports that recount the causes, effects and responses to refugee crises before, during and shortly after World War II.” The records are sourced from the foreign and colonial office files in the U.K. National Archives, the U.S. State Department from the National Archives Records Administration, the British India office collection from the British Library, and the archives of World Jewish Relief.


Trial access: Border and Migration Studies Online & Security Issues Online

Through April 30, the Library has trial access to Border and Migration Studies Online, a collection of primary source documents, archives, films, and ephemera related to significant border areas and events from the 19th to 21st centuries. The materials were selected and are organized around themes such as border identities; border enforcement and control; border disputes; border criminologies; maritime borders; human trafficking; sea migration; undocumented and unauthorized migration; and global governance of migration. Geographic topics addressed include Mexico and the United States; EU and its Borders, Internal and External; Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Palestine, and Syria; The Congo and its borders; Germany and its borders; Argentina and its borders; Canada and the United States; and Turkey and its borders.

This trial also provides access to Security Issues Online, containing primary and secondary materials across multiple media formats and content types for each selected event, including Iran (1940s to the Present), 1960 U-2 Incident, World War II and Intelligence, Cold War: The Bay of Pigs and the Cuban Missile Crisis, 1961-1962, and more.


Exhibit: Institute of Governmental Studies Centennial

igs 100 1920-2020The Institute of Governmental Studies is celebrating its 100th anniversary this year! A hundred years ago, as efforts to reform government corruption were taking root across the country, IGS was founded by political scientists who saw an opportunity to build public administration into an academic discipline to educate new generations of civic leaders. The library has been the heart of IGS since its founding, and holds more than 400,000 items, many of them unique reports, pamphlets, bibliographies, and other ephemera.

An exhibit now on display in the IGS Library highlights the people and projects that built IGS over the last century. The Institute will be celebrating its centennial with events and programs throughout the year, so please check igs.berkeley.edu for updates.

The IGS Library is open to the general public and the campus community from 10am-5pm, Monday through Friday. Email igsl@berkeley.edu or call us at 510-642-1472 with any questions.


Primary Sources: Bibliotheca Philadelphiensis

Cover of a book of hoursBibliotheca Philadelphiensis houses its digital collection at the Internet Archive and represents holdings of libraries in the Philadelphia area, including “Princeton, Bryn Mawr, Villanova, Swarthmore, and many more college and university libraries, as well as the American Philosophical Society, National Archives at Philadelphia, and other august institutions of higher learning and conservation.” More information can be found at the Open Culture website.


Event: Publish or Perish Reframed: Navigating the New Landscape of Scholarly Publishing

University of California authors published about 50,000 scholarly articles last year alone—comprising nearly 10% of all research in the United States. Despite this tremendous productivity, UC scholars continue to experience a tension between publishing their research in ways that ensure readership or access, and perceptions about the effect of certain outlets and publishing choices on their research impact or career advancement.

In this panel, we’ll unpack the landscape of modern scholarly publishing by exploring economics and stakeholder power structures, and what the University of California is doing to address these issues through recent publisher negotiations.

We will also learn from publishing experts about how to maximize research dissemination, access, and impact through the decisions we make about open access, copyright transfer, and publication choices. Faculty will share publishing advice and guidance for early career researchers as they navigate their academic careers. They will also discuss how tenure and promotion practices are being adjusted to better reflect diversity in publishing outputs and venues. There will be a Q&A session at the end of the discussion.

Speakers will include:

  • Benjamin Hermalin, Vice Provost for the Faculty; Professor of Finance and Professor of Economics, UC Berkeley
  • Philip B. Stark, Professor of Statistics, Associate Dean, Division of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Regional Associate Dean (Interim), College of Chemistry and Division of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, UC Berkeley
  • Rachael Samberg, Scholarly Communication Officer, UC Berkeley Library
  • Timothy Vollmer, Scholarly Communication & Copyright Librarian, UC Berkeley Library

RSVP to join us for this timely conversation on current scholarly publishing issues.

Image of the poster for the Publish or Perish event

 


Primary Sources: Diseños Collection at the California State Archives

hand drawn map of Aguajito Rancho
“Aguajito Rancho,” California State Archives Exhibits, accessed November 27, 2019, http://exhibits.sos.ca.gov/items/show/11154.

“Within the Diseños Collection there are 493 hand-drawn sketch maps, or diseños, that were created from approximately 1866-1871. These sketch maps were hand-copied from originals that were created from approximately 1827-1846. These are part of a larger collection that makes up the Spanish and Mexican Land Grant Records that also include expedientes, or written documents regarding the grant petition, and other related documents. Each diseño includes naturally occurring boundaries such as rivers, mountains, rock outcropping, and trees as markers. Many of the diseños have labeled neighboring properties and as part of the initial land grant process all boarders were agreed upon by surrounding landowners. The diseños also show existing travel routes, locations of houses and local place names.

“At the end of the Mexican-American War in 1848, California became a territory of the United States after Mexico and the United States signed the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. Among other things, the treaty directed the U.S. government to honor legitimate land claims of Mexican citizens in the territory. Following California’s statehood in 1850, Congress passed the Land Act of 1851 creating the Board of Land Commissioners. The Board used the diseños, expedientes, U.S. Surveyor General surveys, and other related title documents from landowners to verify individual land ownership and boundaries. Over a period of five years, the Board of Land Commissioners reviewed 813 grant claims, but only approved 553. The Mexican land grant process had a major influence on the development of California land by shaping settlement patterns and land ownership. As some of the earliest maps in California, diseños are essential to understanding the complex system of land ownership in the state today.”

California State Archives: https://www.sos.ca.gov/archives/collections/disenos-collection/


Primary Sources: South Asia Open Archives

SAOA logoThe South Asia Materials Project (SAMP) is an ongoing collaboration between the Center for Research Libraries, US research libraries, and partners from South Asia, that preserves rare and endangered South Asian materials. From that project grew the South Asia Open Archives (SAOA), which includes historical and contemporary sources covering the arts, humanities, and social sciences, in English and South Asian languages, from and about South Asia.

Four SAOA collections (over 350,000 pages) are now freely available on the JSTOR platform:

    • Caste & Social Structure
    • Literature
    • Social & Economic History
    • Women & Gender

Event: $1 BOOK SALE

$1 BOOK SALE

Homecoming at UC Berkeley
Saturday, October 19
9am – 3pm
180 Doe Library

The 4,000+ books in 180 Doe will be offered for $1 each. Most books are fresh – that is, they have not been offered for sale before. You will find some surprisingly attractive books in the room. I hope that many move from the Library’s shelves to yours.

The Doe Library building will open at 9am on the day of the sale. The best place to wait, if you plan to arrive in advance, is at the south entrance to Doe. Right at 9am I’ll walk over to room 180 with those who have been waiting in line. I’ll ask that everyone maintains his or her place in the line.

Scanners are permitted for those who require an electronic second opinion. Hoarding books for subsequent leisurely review, however, is not.

Thank you for your interest, and we hope to see you there,
Dirk Kennedy

The Library
University of California, Berkeley