Trial of 30 Dnei Digital Archive

As a courtesy from our vendor East View, I was glad to inform you that we have set up a 30 day trial of a Russian periodical of literary importance- 30 Dnei. Below links provide access information and publisher-provided description.

https://libproxy.berkeley.edu/login?qurl=https%3A%2F%2Fdlib.eastview.com%2Fbrowse%2Fpublication%2F113406

or http://ucblib.link/3ec

The trial will end on 29th April 2021.

30 DNEI

Founded in 1925 in Moscow and in continuous print until its closure in 1941, 30 Dnei was an illustrated Soviet literary journal most famous for the serialized publications of such Soviet literary sensations as Il’f and Petrov’s The Twelve Chairs and The Golden Calf. Praised and supported by none other than Maxim Gorky the journal was conceived by its publisher as a platform for the publication of short form literature, both original and translated, and was geared towards the emerging generation of writers and the intelligentsia. Apart from helping launch and shape the literary careers of a slew of Soviet writers the journal was instrumental in introducing acclaimed works of short fiction, essays, and poetry by foreign authors as well. Some of the most important Soviet and foreign writers whose works have appeared on the pages of 30 Dnei were Vasily Grossman, Vladimir Mayakovsky, Boris Pasternak, Ernest Hemingway, Langston Hughes, Paul Valery and others. Falling into disfavor with the central government in later years, with periodical criticisms of the editorial direction of the journal appearing in Pravda and Literaturnaia gazeta, the journal would cease publication soon after Nazi Germany’s invasion of the USSR in June of 1941.

30 Dnei Digital Archive contains the complete run of the popular literary monthly journal and represents an important resource for researchers of Soviet history and literature in its formative period.


Library Database Trial: Russian-Ottoman Relations (1600-1914)-Brill-Parts I, II, III and IV

We are pleased to announce a library trial of Brill’s four parts database-Russian-Ottoman Relations.

The resource’s self-description is as follows, “Brill in cooperation with the National Library of Russia in St. Petersburg, for the first time brings together a unique collection of rare primary sources on a  dynamic part of the history of Turkey, Russia, the Middle East, and Western Europe: Russian-Ottoman Relations. They include publications of relevant government documents, diplomatic reports, travel accounts that provided new details about hitherto relatively unknown regions, and fiercely political (and polemical) tracts and pamphlets designed to rally public support for one power or the other. Published across Europe over a period of two centuries, these sources provide detailed insights not only in the military ebb and flow of Russian-Ottoman relations but also in their effects on European public opinion. ”

The trial is set to start today and end on April 8, 2021

Please authenticate using your proxy or VPN credentials if you are trying to access the resource from an off-campus location.
This series currently consists of 4 parts. Please click on each hyperlink to access the full-text of each resource.

The Origins, 1600-1800
Part 1: The Origins 1600-1800 

Shifts in the Balance of Power, 1800-1853
Part 2: Shifts in the Balance of Power, 1800-1853

The Crimean War, 1854-1856
Part 3: The Crimean War 1854-1856

The End of the Empires, 1857-1914
Part 4: The End of the Empires, 1857-1914


Announcing a launch of new quarterly webinar series!-Save the Date, March 18, 2021

This event is the first quarterly event in a four-part series entitled “Connecting and collecting to empower.” The series will focus on libraries and library collections from different regions of the globe to highlight the collections, print, and electronic resources from often “forgotten” or “exoticized” parts of our world. No library is an island and as curators, we are often interconnected. It is a known fact that today academic libraries can no longer serve as an archive of all that was printed from a specific region. This series is geared towards students, faculty, and researchers, and the presenters in these webinars will be faculty, academic librarians, curators, researchers, and doctoral students. Each presenter will present how the library’s collections have aided them in their academic pursuits. What were some of the challenges they had to face when they were looking for specific resources and how and if the librarians helped them overcome them?

First Webinar:  The Other Asia: Central Asia and Library Collections (Spring 2021)

This 90 minutes webinar is dedicated to various library sources in Central Asia. Often, just like the Great Game in the 19th century, Central Asian Studies library collections are contested and relegated between the North American librarians for East European/ Eurasian Studies and Middle Eastern/ Near Eastern Studies. The US State Department, on the other hand, has attributed Central Asia alongside South Asia. Thus collecting Central Asian materials marks extensive collaboration among various librarians. The speakers at this webinar will speak to their efforts in collaborating to build a sustainable collection at their institutions. In this meeting, they will discuss some of the strategies they have used to develop research-level collections and collaborate with their colleagues in Central Asia. They will also focus on some open access resources.

This zoom event is free and open to all with prior registration here.

Thursday, March 18, 202111 am-12:30 PST/ 1 pm-2:30 EST

Opening Remarks:  Professor David W. Roland-Holst, Agricultural and Resource Economics, UC Berkeley

Speakers:

Mr. Andy Spencer, Librarian,  Middle Eastern & Central Asian Studies Librarian, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Dr. Akram Habibulla, Librarian for Middle Eastern, Islamic, and Central Eurasian Studies, Indiana University

Dr. Shah Mahmoud Hanifi, Professor of History and the founding coordinator of the Middle Eastern Communities and Migrations minor, James Madison University

Emily Laskin, Ph.D. Candidate Slavic Languages and Literatures, UC Berkeley

Organizer: Dr. Liladhar R. Pendse, UC Berkeley

 


Happy International Women’s Day-March 8th!

Today, March 8, is celebrated around the world as International Women’s Day. In the USSR, this holiday was celebrated rather religiously as the role of Soviet women in the success of the Soviet experiment and internationalist policies was undeniable. The conceptualization of the Soviet Woman as an idea was nuanced and complicated. A Wikipedia entry starts as follows, “International Women’s Day (IWD) is a global holiday celebrated annually on March 8 to commemorate the cultural, political, and socioeconomic achievements of women.[3] It is also a focal point in the women’s rights movement, bringing attention to issues such as gender equality, reproductive rights, and violence against women.”[4]

Image Source: Messy Nessy (https://www.messynessychic.com/2017/03/10/the-soviet-communist-origins-of-international-womens-day/) Fair Academic Use Only. The copyright belongs to the creator of the image.

Temma Kaplan’s article, “On the Socialist Origins of International Women’s Day,” provides insights into how this day became a signifier in the Socialist World. One however forgets that the origins of this day can be found in Germany as noted by Rochelle Goldberg Ruthchild in her article, “From West to East International Women’s Day, the First Decade.” Here you can access some materials from UC Berkeley Library’s catalog regarding International Women’s Day. Also, some posters from the collections of several California libraries can be found here.

One can watch an interesting clip from YouTube with a title, “Демонстрация женщин в 1917 году. Московские Новости. 8 марта 1967,” and a concert honoring women in the Soviet Union from 1984.

Below is the clip of a 1963 concert dedicated to International Women’s day:Концерт 8 Марта из Большого театра СССР (1963).

And here is a clip of protest on the occasion of March 8th from Mexico.


Just launched: the Global Social Responses to COVID-19 Web Archive!

We are pleased to announce that the Global Social Responses to COVID-19 Web Archive has been launched. Created in March 2020 at the onset of the pandemic — and curated by 29 librarians throughout the Ivy Plus Libraries Confederation and beyond — the Archive documents regional, social responses to the pandemic, which are critical in understanding the scope of the pandemic’s humanitarian, socioeconomic, and cultural impact. With an emphasis on websites produced by underrepresented ethnicities and stateless groups, the Archive covers (but is not limited to): sites published by non-governmental organizations that focus on public health, humanitarian relief, and education; sites published by established and amateur artists in any realm of cultural production; sites published by local news sources; sites published by civil society actors and representatives; and relevant blogs and social media pages. At the time of its launch, the Archive featured over 2,000 websites from over 80 countries in over 50 languages.

You can access the collection in Archive-It here: https://archive-it.org/collections/14022.

For more information about the Global Social Responses to COVID-19 Web Archive (including a full list of curators), see: libguides.princeton.edu/covid-ivy.

For a blog post that may be redistributed across the Confederation and beyond, please see the following: https://ivpluslibraries.org/2021/03/iplc-launches-the-global-social-responses-to-covid-19-web-archive/.

The Ivy Plus Libraries Confederation’s Web Collecting Program is an initiative of the Confederation’s Collection Development Group, under the direction of the Web Collecting Advisory Committee and Samantha Abrams, the Web Resources Collection Librarian. If you have questions about the Global Social Responses to COVID-19 Web Archive (or if you’d like to get involved by proposing one of your own collections), please reach out to ivyplusweb@library.columbia.edu.

I hope you’ll join me in recognizing those (copied here) involved in making this important resource available to researchers and the general public: Fernando Acosta-Rodríguez, Ellen Ambrosone, Yuusuf Caruso, Paloma Celis Carbajal, Stuart Dawrs, Charlotte Giles, Glaudia Götze-Sam, Tristan Hinkel, Bogdan Horbal, Lunja Jeschke, Thomas Keenan, Ksenya Kiebuzinski, Miree Ku, Joshua Kueh, Hyoungbae Lee, Heather Martin, Brandon Miliate, Brendan Nieubuurt, Setsuko Noguchi, Liladhar Pendse, Anna Rakityanskaya, Deborah Schlein, Joshua Seufert, Alain St. Pierre, Sean Swanick, Amy Torres, Gudrun Wirtz, Ryan Wolfson-Ford, and Lou Zhou.

Source: Samantha Abrams, Columbia University Libraries. Posted by Liladhar Pendse- participant-curator in the archival project (UC Berkeley Library).


Save the date: Black History Month Celebration at UC Berkeley Library-A webinar

Dear All,

We have organized an upcoming event that will mark Black History Month at UC Berkeley on February 26, 11-12:30 pm PST/ 2 pm to 3:30 pm EST. I wanted to thank our speakers for this event, and colleagues in the Racial Justice Taskforce,  Library Communications Team: Aisha, Amber, Tor, and Tiffany, who have supported me with organizing this event. The event is free and open to all. Please see the event poster (Thank you, Aisha-actual poster creation, and Tor-with edits).

The registration link is below:

http://ucberk.li/black-history-month-event


Graduate Student Conference: “Images of the Future in the History of Russian Culture”

Graduate Student Conference  

“Images of the Future in the History of Russian Culture”

Date: April 16-18, 2021

Deadline: March 25, 2021

Who can participate: MA students, Ph.D. students, independent scholars

Who organizes: Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences

Topics: The future as an element of political ideology; projects and experiments in the field of urban planning policy, social relations, and everyday life; ideas about the future in different social groups; images of the future in art and visual culture; utopian worlds in literature and cinema; religious and quasi-religious eschatology.

Format: Zoom platform

More information:

http://msses.vectors.tilda.ws/future2

 


NYU Jordan Center’s 2021 Graduate Student Essay Competition (FY)

See the announcement below:

The Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia and All the Russias are pleased to announce the second annual Graduate Student Essay Competition. Enter for a chance to get published on the blog and win cash prizes! We invite 750-1200 word submissions from full- or part-time M.A. and Ph.D. students from any accredited academic institution in the United States, on any topic and sub-discipline within Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies, broadly defined. Cultural criticism; public-facing treatments of scholarly work; political analysis; book, film, or event reviews; and more are welcome.

All submissions must be in English and observe the blog’s submission guidelines and full competition rules.

Essays are due no later than April 15th at 11:59 PM EST and must be submitted via this Google form.

Seven (7) winners will be selected based on their pieces’ originality, clarity, and argumentation, as well as their correspondence to the blog’s general tone and interests as stipulated in the submission guidelines linked above. Winners will receive, respectively, $500 (first prize); $250 (second prize); $100 (third prize); and $50 (runners-up). Winners and runners-up will have their essays published in All the Russias.

Competition results will be announced by Summer 2021.

Please direct any questions to alltherussias@gmail.com.”

Source: https://jordanrussiacenter.org/news/draft-call-for-submissions-atrs-graduate-student-essay-competition/


Announcing a launch of new quarterly webinar series!-Save the Date, March 18, 2021

This event is the first quarterly event in a four-part series entitled “Connecting and collecting to empower.” The series will focus on libraries and library collections from different regions of the globe to highlight the collections, print, and electronic resources from often “forgotten” or “exoticized” parts of our world. No library is an island and as curators, we are often interconnected. It is a known fact that today academic libraries can no longer serve as an archive of all that was printed from a specific region. This series is geared towards students, faculty, and researchers, and the presenters in these webinars will be faculty, academic librarians, curators, researchers, and doctoral students. Each presenter will present how the library’s collections have aided them in their academic pursuits. What were some of the challenges they had to face when they were looking for specific resources and how and if the librarians helped them overcome them?

First Webinar:  The Other Asia: Central Asia and Library Collections (Spring 2021)

This 90 minutes webinar is dedicated to various library sources in Central Asia. Often, just like the Great Game in the 19th century, Central Asian Studies library collections are contested and relegated between the North American librarians for East European/ Eurasian Studies and Middle Eastern/ Near Eastern Studies. The US State Department, on the other hand, has attributed Central Asia alongside South Asia. Thus collecting Central Asian materials marks extensive collaboration among various librarians. The speakers at this webinar will speak to their efforts in collaborating to build a sustainable collection at their institutions. In this meeting, they will discuss some of the strategies they have used to develop research-level collections and collaborate with their colleagues in Central Asia. They will also focus on some open access resources.

This zoom event is free and open to all with prior registration here.

Thursday, March 18, 202111 am-12:30 PST/ 1 pm-2:30 EST