New Latin American/ Latinx/ Chicanx Studies Database at UC Berkeley: Hispanic American Newspapers, 1808-1980

We are glad to announce the purchase of access to Readex’s Hispanic American Newspapers, 1808-1980 database at UC Berkeley. This collection represents the single largest compilation of Spanish-language newspapers printed in the U.S. during the 19th and 20th centuries. The database provides access to thousands of titles and includes both English and Spanish language materials. The currently registered students and faculty can access the database using your UCB credentials here: Hispanic American Newspapers, 1890-1980.

The title list of the newspapers that are included in this collection can be accessed here. There are forty-four titles that were published in California. Some titles have extensive runs while the others have only a single issue that can be accessed. The image below is used for demonstrative and educational purposes only.

 

Source: Cinema, 1 Feb. 1935, p. 1. Readex: Hispanic American Newspapers, infoweb.newsbank.com/apps/readex/doc?p=EANASP&docref=image/v2%3A11E0D8ECE2FAA6F1%40EANASP-11E89061E331F2E0%402427835-11E888FE0098D8E8%400. Accessed 21 June 2021.

4th Annual Nahuatl Conference at UCLA (Friday, June 4, 2021)

Usually, we do not post about what is happening at the other University of California campuses. However, this announcement piqued my interest as it deals with the Nahuatl language and history. One advantage the pandemic has offered us is to virtually attend the conferences instead of traveling at long distances from the comfort of one’s place. One of my faculty mentors was Dr. Kevin Terraciano at UCLA, and his works on the indigenous languages- especially Nahuatl are known all over the country. Please register here.

 


UC Berkeley Library’s Web Page of Task Force on Racial Justice Launched!

Today our University Librarian Professor Jeff MacKie-Mason, University Librarian, Chief Digital Scholarship Officer, Professor, School of Information and Professor of Economics, UC Berkeley Library made a formal announcement about the report by the Library’s Task Force for on Racial Justice.

The webpage can be accessed here: https://www.lib.berkeley.edu/about/racial-justice-task-force

The full charge of the Task Force can be accessed by clicking here.

Library Colleagues can access the report below.

“In spring 2020, the Task Force presented an initial report to Library Cabinet. This briefing includes a list of proposed recommendations and actionable strategies for improving the ways in which racism and discrimination can be addressed within the campus library system.

Read the report.”

The full statement can be read here by clicking on this text!

https://www.lib.berkeley.edu/about/racial-justice-task-force

 

Source: An email dated from the co-Chair Shannon Monroe on 5/25/21 announced the launch of this webpage.


UCB Library Event: Undaunted Archivists and Curators from the American South Speak!

Undaunted Archivists and Curators from the American South Speak!

Date: Tuesday, June 1, 2021

9:30-11 a.m. PDT
12:30-2 p.m. EDT,
10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. MDT,
11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. CDT

The registration link is below. The event is free, and all are invited to attend.

http://ucberk.li/3fm  


CRL Webinar-Radical Collaboration: Library Publisher Partnerships to Advance the Global Knowledge Commons

The CRL Webinar are available at the end of this post.

The Global Press Archive Charter Alliance is an initiative by East View Information Services and the Center for Research Libraries to develop a unique series of thematically designed collections to meet the priorities of the CRL members. 74 CRL (including UCB) and NERL libraries have committed $4.25 million to help launch the first three years of the project.

So far, we have access to Mexican Revolutionary Newspapers and Russian Imperial Newspapers as a part of this process.

Independent and Revolutionary Mexican Newspapers 

The Independent and Revolutionary Mexican Newspapers collection, with a preliminary release of 135,000 pages from 477 titles, will ultimately include approximately 1,000 titles from Mexico’s pre-independence, independence, and revolutionary periods (1807-1929).

Imperial Russian Newspapers 

The Imperial Russian Newspapers collection comprises out-of-copyright newspapers spanning the eighteenth, nineteenth, and early twentieth centuries, up to the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution. [1782-1918]

Webinar Recording is below:


Call for Proposals: LAUC-B 2021 Conference Oct 5-6 2021 – Reimagining Libraries Through Critical Library Practices, October 5-6, 2021- Call for Proposals Due June 15, 2021

The Librarian’s Association of the University of California, Berkeley (LAUC-B) invites you to submit a proposal for the 2021 conference, Reimagining Libraries Through Critical Library Practices, an online conference that will take place Tuesday, October 5 to Wednesday, October 6, 10 am to 3 pm PST.

Proposals are due Tuesday, June 15, 2021, and can be submitted using this form. We will notify successful applicants by July 15, 2021.

For further conference information and the full call for proposals, please visit LAUC-B 2021 Conference Website

Call for proposals brief version: Library work is embedded in and inherently tied to socio-political circumstances. We welcome proposals that emphasize and examine critical librarianship through the lens of social justice, diversity, equity, inclusion, and anti-racist work.

We invite proposals from diverse voices addressing critical library practices including:

  • Community Archives, Inclusion, and Underrepresented Communities
  • Critical Library Pedagogy
  • Developing standards for critical librarianship in Digital Literacy and Digital Scholarship
  • Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
  • Open Access
  • Social Justice and Anti-racist Work
  • The theory and practice of critical library work that includes all library professionals

All proposal abstracts should be no more than 300 words and indicate the type of session you are proposing. We will be holding the following session formats:

  • Lightning Talks (5-7 minute presentations)
  • 20-minute individual presentations
  • 50-minute panel
  • Poster session

We encourage proposals for virtual presentations that represent all aspects of library work (including technical services, access services, interlibrary loan, reference, instruction, library administration, technology, youth services, and more) and all library workers (including library students, paraprofessionals, and members of underrepresented groups).

For further conference information, please visit here.

Please submit your proposal by Tuesday, June 15, 2021. Successful applicants will be notified by Thursday, July 15, 2021.

If you have any questions, please contact us through the website or at laucbconfinfo@lists.berkeley.edu

Sincerely,

LAUC-B 2021 Conference Committee:

Paromita B. (UCLA)
Kelsey B. (UCI)
Kristina B. (UCB)
Lia F. (UCSD)
Ann G. (UCB)
Shannon K. (UCB)
Corliss L. (UCB)
Natalie M. (UCI)
Jin M. (UCSD)
Erica N. (UCB)
Liladhar P. (UCB)
Scott P (UCB)
Christina V. (UCB)


Come Celebrate Asian-American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, May 11, 2021 @UC Berkeley Library

May is Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Heritage
Month, dedicated to celebrating the Asian American and Pacific Islander communities in the United States. During this 90-minute webinar, speakers will discuss historical and contemporary issues affecting the AAPI community. In light of the recent attacks on the Asian American community, this event takes on particular importance.

The event is free and open to all with prior registration: http://ucberk.li/aapihm-event 

 


Armenian Genocide Remembrance Day: 24 April 2021

The blog post below was written at 7 am PDT on 4/24/21. President Biden has released since then a statement recognizing the Armenian Genocide. Read it here: https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/statements-releases/2021/04/24/statement-by-president-joe-biden-on-armenian-remembrance-day/


As the United States President prepares to recognize the Armenian Genocide, we want to continue our efforts to collect materials related to the Armenian Genocide. At UC Berkeley, we have been collecting proactively academic and scholarly level resources that deal with the issues of the Armenian Genocide. One can access our holdings in the library’s catalog that is about to give its way to modern  ALMA based integrated library system, using the subject terms such as Armenian Genocide, 1915-1923

The other equally important database that will provide information about the local collections provided that you can input the zip code is OCLC’s WorldCat. Here you can get information on the works that are about the Armenian Genocide in several different formats. In the United States, there are several key collections on the topic of the Armenian Genocide. One of them is in Belmont at the Mardigian Library. Houshamadyan Organization’s Open Digital Archive in Germany provides access to tons of photographs and voice recordings that relate to the lives of Armenians in the Ottoman Empire. The Library of Congress’s linked data project also highlights the Armenian Genocide. The US Congress’s resolutions, such as H.Res.296: Affirming the United States record on the Armenian Genocide, and others can be accessed here.

UC Berkeley’s faculty actively continues to research the subject. : UC Berkeley Students and faculty can access an electronic copy of the latest work that Professor Stephan Astourian has edited (after authenticating using proxy or VPN) here. We also have its paper copy.

In our Latin American Studies collections, I have tried to collect consciously materials on the Armenian Genocide in Spanish. More information here:

Do not forget the Genocide! I leave you with several documentaries below on the Armenian Genocide (for academic use only).


Open Access: Imperial Russian Newspapers (Center for Research Libraries)

The CRL and East View have opened the first release of content for Imperial Russian Newspapers, which is the fourth Open Access collection of titles digitized under the Global Press Archive (GPA) CRL Charter Alliance.

The Imperial Russian Newspapers collection, with a preliminary release of 230,000 pages, spans the eighteenth through early twentieth centuries and will include core titles from Moscow and St. Petersburg as well as regional newspapers.  Central and regional ‘gubernskie vedomosti’ will be complemented by a selection of private newspapers.

The complete announcement is available on the CRL website at https://www.crl.edu/news/crl-and-east-view-release-open-access-imperial-russian-newspapers

Source: CRL-SEEMP


Trial of 30 Dnei Digital Archive

As a courtesy from our vendor East View, I was glad to inform you that we have set up a 30 day trial of a Russian periodical of literary importance- 30 Dnei. Below links provide access information and publisher-provided description.

https://libproxy.berkeley.edu/login?qurl=https%3A%2F%2Fdlib.eastview.com%2Fbrowse%2Fpublication%2F113406

or http://ucblib.link/3ec

The trial will end on 29th April 2021.

30 DNEI

Founded in 1925 in Moscow and in continuous print until its closure in 1941, 30 Dnei was an illustrated Soviet literary journal most famous for the serialized publications of such Soviet literary sensations as Il’f and Petrov’s The Twelve Chairs and The Golden Calf. Praised and supported by none other than Maxim Gorky the journal was conceived by its publisher as a platform for the publication of short form literature, both original and translated, and was geared towards the emerging generation of writers and the intelligentsia. Apart from helping launch and shape the literary careers of a slew of Soviet writers the journal was instrumental in introducing acclaimed works of short fiction, essays, and poetry by foreign authors as well. Some of the most important Soviet and foreign writers whose works have appeared on the pages of 30 Dnei were Vasily Grossman, Vladimir Mayakovsky, Boris Pasternak, Ernest Hemingway, Langston Hughes, Paul Valery and others. Falling into disfavor with the central government in later years, with periodical criticisms of the editorial direction of the journal appearing in Pravda and Literaturnaia gazeta, the journal would cease publication soon after Nazi Germany’s invasion of the USSR in June of 1941.

30 Dnei Digital Archive contains the complete run of the popular literary monthly journal and represents an important resource for researchers of Soviet history and literature in its formative period.