Now Online: Images from Glass Negatives of the Panama-Pacific International Exposition

Palace of Fine Arts building, Panama-Pacific International Exposition
Palace of Fine Arts (BANC PIC 2015.013:50522–NEG)

The Bancroft Pictorial Processing Unit is proud to announce that The Edward A. Rogers collection of Cardinell-Vincent Company and Panama-Pacific International Exposition Photographs has been organized, archivally housed, individually listed, and made (substantially) available online. This work was accomplished over two years, thanks to grant support from the National Endowment for the Humanities and, of course, careful hard work on the part of many library staff.

In this blog posting, Project Archivist Lori Hines describes some of the most challenging (and rewarding) work; preserving and providing access to fragile and often damaged glass negatives.

 

Handling Glass Plate Negatives: A Lesson in Mindfulness

The Rogers collection of Panama Pacific International Exposition photographs, received as a gift in 2014, includes over 2,000 glass negatives. These fragile items required special handling and archival containers with padding. Hardest to work with were approximately 150 oversize glass negatives ranging from 11 x 14 inches to 12 x 20 inches. Antique glass can become brittle and, of course, is heavy. From handling to wheeling the negatives back and forth to the conservation department and the digital lab, one had to be very conscious of every move and step taken.

Stack of large glass plate negatives

This first photo shows how the negatives were received in the library. Note they have no padding between the plates and there are only original, brittle sleeves to protect them. A stack of ten or fifteen is very heavy and getting your fingers under one, to lift it off the stack, is challenging. The weight of the negatives on top of each other is also a risk — the antique glass can easily crack under the weight.

Large glass negatives in archival box

This photo shows how the negatives have been housed by library staff; vertically with corrugated archival cardboard around each. Our library conservators designed the housing to limit box weight, to provide protective padding, to protect the plates from abrasion as they’re removed, and to make handling safer.

Custom archival box for large glass negatives

 

The largest plates, at 12 x 20 inches, needed another housing solution because it was impractical to store them upright, but the weight of one on another was a concern. The Library’s Conservation Department built custom trays to hold each 12 x 20 negative, with just three plates (and their trays) in an archival box that is stored flat on a cabinet shelf.

 

Handling large glass negative

 

 

 

The negatives are handled on the long side of the glass to offer best support and, during the cleaning, housing, and inventory process, are rested on a piece of thin foam padding to buffer any impact with the work table.

 

 

About 10% of the negatives arrived broken. To be digitized, we had to re-piece the broken negatives together on a supporting sheet of glass, like a puzzle, then hand it off immediately to the photographer in the Library’s Digital Imaging Lab. The glass sheet with the broken negative on top was then placed on a light table, so it was lit from behind, to be captured by the digital camera. The light table and camera are visible in the background of this image.

Staff re-assembling broken glass negatives in the digital imaging lab

 

The results were often quite satisfying,  as can be seen in this example of a badly broken glass negative that was pieced together.

Broken glass negative, re-assembled, of Workmen On Tower
Workmen on tower. Edward A. Rogers collection of Cardinell-Vincent Company and Panama-Pacific International Exposition photographs. BANC PIC 2015.013: 02916–NEG

 

The finding aid describing and listing the entire Rogers collection, with more than 2,000 digital images, may be viewed at the Online Archive of California.

To browse examples of images scanned from broken plates, try searching the finding aid for “negative is broken”, and navigating through the results, or by browsing this Calisphere website search that retrieves just the broken-plate images.

Special thanks go to Christine Huhn and the staff of the Digital Imaging Lab; Hannah Tashjian, Erika Lindensmith, Martha Little, and Emily Ramos  of the Conservation Department; staff of the Library Systems Office and the California Digital Library that worked with us to get the material online; to Gawain Weaver Art Conservation (contractors for preservation and scanning of panoramic film negatives), and to the Bancroft Pictorial Unit team that devoted much or their 2016-2018 work life to this effort: Lori Hines, Lu Ann Sleeper, and a crew of student staff.

 

 


Case Studies in Marijuana Policy: 3 Part Webinar Series

Want to learn from the experiences of other states working to develop and manage the effects of marijuana policy? Here are 3 webinars that are one hour long each that may help. Hosted by RTI International, these webinars are moderated by RTI experts and feature presentations from state representatives.

Marijuana Policy Webinar

Part 1: The Challenge of Edibles
Part 2: The Impact of Legalization on Youth
Part 3: Driving While High (available soon)

Note: Part 1 webinar requires Adobe Connect or Adobe Flash to view. Part 2 is a YouTube video. The slides are in pdf format.


Indoor Environments & Green Buildings Policy Resource Center

Would you like to easily search for other states’ laws for indoor air quality (IAQ)? For school environmental health? Then this resource might be of interest to you!

The Environmental Law Institute (ELI) has developed just such a resource. Its Indoor Environments & Green Buildings Program provides information to support the development and implementation of sound policies to address key health and environmental issues in design, construction, operation, and maintenance of schools, homes, and other buildings.

In the ELI Policy Resource Center, you’ll find a database of state IAQ laws that cover a range of IAQ issues. As a subset of it, you can search for topics in school environmental health separately.

You’ll also find research reports on IAQ in homes and schools; policy briefs like the one on Indoor Air Quality in Nail Salons; and profiles of innovative state programs such as the Washington State Department of Health’s Guidance on Improving Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality during Wildfire Smoke Events.


New Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology (DART) Subject Filter

NLM PubMed provides search filters to aid in searching selected topics.Subject filters restrict retrieval to specific subjects. A new subject filter strategy
was recently added. The Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology (DART) subject filter was created to facilitate searching for subjects in the area of teratology and other aspects of developmental and reproductive toxicology.

This filter can also be used in a search as . For example, if you wanted to find articles on the developmental and reproductive toxicological effects of mercury, you might try a search like:
mercury AND dart[sb]

Found under the Subjects tag on the PubMed Special Queries page, you can scroll down to the name and simply click on it to run the search in PubMed. Once here, you’ll find this and other special pre-canned PubMed queries.

Want to see what the underlying search strategy looks like? You can view it online here.

When using these, you will want to review any of these search strategies that you may use to make sure they cover everything you want them to cover.


Best Babies Zone Basics: A Step-by-Step Guide

Are you interested in eliminating racial inequities in birth outcomes? Would you like to see how one initiative tackled this issue? Then read on!

BBZ Basics is a step-by-step guide to implementing the Best Babies Zone (BBZ) approach. It is intended for both public health and non-public health organizations looking to start or build upon a place-based, multi-sector, community-driven initiative to reduce racial inequities in infant mortality.

The guide moves through six steps of a BBZ, including how to select a small, geographically defined Zone within a community; how to collaborate with residents and build resident leadership; and how to plan for evaluation. The guide also includes a number of tools and resources to help you in the planning process, such as a listing of online resources for health and social determinants data, a 2×2 priorities matrix, and more.

The BBZ Initiative began in March 2012 with funding from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. This guide was released December 2017 by the Best Babies Zone Technical Assistance Center at the UC Berkeley School of Public Health.


NACCHO Policy statement on Cannabis

The National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) has published a policy statement, Medical and Recreational Cannabis and Cannabinoids, to assist health departments considering approaches to medical and recreational cannabis within their communities. The policy statement was proposed by NACCHO’s Public Health Law Workgroup and approved by the NACCHO Board of Directors.


New MeSH 2018 terms now posted

Finding the Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) term for your search topic can often help you retrieve more relevant results and help ensure that you don’t miss articles.

MeSH is the National Library of Medicine (NLM) controlled vocabulary thesaurus which is updated annually. NLM uses the MeSH thesaurus to index articles from thousands of biomedical journals for the MEDLINE/PubMed database.

Every year, NLM reviews the MeSH thesaurus and considers changes in terminology. New concepts are constantly emerging while old concepts are in a state of flux, and NLM adjusts MeSH terminology and usage accordingly.

This year 113 MeSH headings were either changed or deleted and replaced with more up-to-date terminology. 471 new MeSH Headings were added to MeSH in 2018.

One major change is to the MeSH vocabulary for smoking and smoking-related terms. These have been updated and expanded for 2018.

Several smoking-related terms are now new MeSH terms. These are:

* Tobacco Smoking
* Cigar Smoking
* Cigarette Smoking
* Smoking, Non-Tobacco Products
* Smoking Reduction

Other new smoking-related MeSH headings to note are Smokers, Smoking Devices, and Smoking Prevention.

Remember that the new MeSH won’t have a lot of articles tagged with them just yet, and most are not retroactive.

The NLM has an online article that you can read if you’d like to learn more about changes in MeSH. It includes a link to the entire list of new terms.

Want a quick MeSH refresher? We have a MeSH Tri-Fold available for you. Or call us with your questions at 510-642-2510.


Using Electronic Health Data for Community Health: Example Cases and Legal Analysis

Have you ever wondered about the hospital data that might be available to you and how you might obtain it? How does HIPAA affect the data you can get access to? And how might you use the data once you’ve got it? If so, then you may want to read on!

This 21 page white paper from the de Beaumont Foundation and Johns Hopkins University was written for public health departments. It gives you a framework that will help you request data from hospitals and health systems – data that can help move the needle on critical public health challenges.

You’ll find six examples of how you might use electronic health data to make progress on childhood asthma, a common and preventable chronic illness. You’ll also read answers to some frequently asked questions about the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). Each case includes a brief discussion of how it might be applied to other public health challenges. Possible applications include monitoring opioid overdoses via data on emergency department visits, assess falls prevention efforts, and map diabetes or lung disease hot spots.

You’ll find this paper available to read for free online here.


Public Health Law Academy

Find the law challenging to understand? Want a clearer understanding of the role it can play in improving population health? Then you may wish to explore the online trainings provided by the Public Health Law Academy.

The Public Health Law Academy, supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) gives you a deeper understanding of the use of law and policy to improve population health outcomes. Developed in cooperation with ChangeLab Solutions, the easy-to-use online trainings offered here are essential for all public health professionals.

These online trainings are appropriate for all public health professionals, including public health lawyers, public health nurses, public health educators, public health advocates, and public health faculty and students.

The Public Health Law Academy currently offers introductory courses as well as classes on hot topics, and plans to add courses in legal epidemiology soon.


Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) workshop

Ingenuity Pathway Analysis

A representative from Qiagen will offer a hands-on training workshop on using IPA to interpret expression data (including RNA-seq).

Date: Thursday, Nov. 9
Time: 1:30-4:30 pm
Location: Bioscience Library Training Room, 2101 Valley Life Sciences Building

You are invited to participate in this free training, and are encouraged to bring your own laptop or use the computer workstations in our training room.

Please register if you are interested in attending.

The workshop will cover how to:

  • Format, upload your data, and launch an analysis
  • Identify likely pathways that are expressed
  • Find causal regulators and their directional effect on gene functions and diseases
  • Build pathways, make connections between entities, and overlay multiple datasets on a pathway or network
  • Understand the affected biological processes
  • Perform a comparison analysis: utilize a heat map to easily visualize trends across multiple time points or samples

Questions? Please contact Elliott Smith (esmith@library.berkeley.edu)