Workshop Reminder—Copyright & Fair Use for Digital Projects

Presentation title slide with logo of the Office of Scholarly Communication Services and text as follows: "Copyright & Fair Use for Digital Projects"

Workshop Date/Time: Tuesday, November 8, 2022, 11:00am–12:30pm

RSVP for Zoom link

This training from the Library’s Office of Scholarly Communication Services will help you navigate the copyright, fair use, and usage rights of including third-party content in your digital project. Whether you seek to embed video from other sources for analysis, post material you scanned from a visit to the archives, add images, upload documents, or more, understanding the basics of copyright and discovering a workflow for answering copyright-related digital scholarship questions will make you more confident in your project. We will also provide an overview of your intellectual property rights as a creator and ways to license your own work.

Please sign up today and join us on November 8.


Workshop: Copyright and Fair Use for Digital Projects

Digital Publishing Workshop Series

Copyright and Fair Use for Digital Projects
Tuesday, November 8th, 11:10am – 12:30pm
Online: Register to receive the Zoom link
Tim Vollmer

This training will help you navigate the copyright, fair use, and usage rights of including third-party content in your digital project. Whether you seek to embed video from other sources for analysis, post material you scanned from a visit to the archives, add images, upload documents, or more, understanding the basics of copyright and discovering a workflow for answering copyright-related digital scholarship questions will make you more confident in your publication. We will also provide an overview of your intellectual property rights as a creator and ways to license your own work.  Register here

 

Please see bit.ly/dp-berk for details.


UC GIS Week 2022: Registration now open!

Register now for the UC GIS Week conference from Nov. 15th – 17th!

The University of California GIS Week is an opportunity for you to learn and engage with experts and mapping projects across the UC system and beyond!

This free hybrid conference is supported by the UC GIS Leadership Committee. In addition to many virtual talks and workshops, keep an eye on the schedule for in-person events happening around the UC Berkeley campus.

Banner image for UC GIS Week 2022


Workshop: The Long Haul: Best Practices for Making Your Digital Project Last

Digital Publishing Workshop Series

The Long Haul: Best Practices for Making Your Digital Project Last
Tuesday, October 25th, 11:10am – 12:00pm
Online: Register to receive the Zoom link
Scott Peterson & Erin Foster

You’ve invested a lot of work in creating a digital project, but how do you ensure it has staying power? We’ll look at choices you can make at the beginning of project development to influence sustainability, best practices for documentation and asset management, and how to sunset your project in a way that ensures long-term access for future researchers. Register here

 

Upcoming Workshops in this Series – Fall 2022:

  • Copyright and Fair Use for Digital Projects

 

Please see bit.ly/dp-berk for details.


GIS & Mapping Community of Practice meetup on Oct. 17

Join us for the next campus GIS & Mapping Community of Practice meetup on October 17 from 2-3 pm! This month’s meetup will take place virtually on Zoom. Register to receive the link.

world map made up of little peopleThis informal meetup offers participants an opportunity to get to know other people using mapping tools and techniques across campus, regardless of discipline. Whether you’re just getting started exploring GIS & Mapping or a seasoned pro (or anywhere in between!), all are welcome to participate in the GIS & Mapping Community of Practice. Bring your questions and get excited to meet fellow mappers!

Let us know if you’re interested in sharing this month (or at a future meetup) during our community “show and tell,” and also what topics you’re interested in learning about, by completing the GIS & Mapping Community of Practice Interest Form.


Workshop: Creating Web Maps with ArcGIS Online

Digital Publishing Workshop Series

Creating Web Maps with ArcGIS Online
Thursday, October 13th, 11:10am – 12:30pm
Online: Register to receive the Zoom link
Susan Powell

Want to make a web map, but not sure where to start? This short workshop will introduce key mapping terms and concepts and give an overview of popular platforms used to create web maps. We’ll explore one of these platforms (ArcGIS Online) in more detail. You’ll get some hands-on practice adding data, changing the basemap, and creating interactive map visualizations. At the end of the workshop you’ll have the basic knowledge needed to create your own simple web maps. Register here

Upcoming Workshops in this Series – Fall 2022:

  • The Long Haul: Best Practices for Making Your Digital Project Last
  • Copyright and Fair Use for Digital Projects

 

Please see bit.ly/dp-berk for details.

 


University of California Research Data Policy: a few things to know

University of California Research Data Policy: a few things to know

The University of California Office of the President recently announced an updated Research Data Policy, effective July 15, 2022. The new policy complements the original policy from 1958. It re-confirms that research data are owned by the University but outlines how University Researchers may use the data generated or collected in the course of their research. While most researchers likely will find that the updated policy doesn’t require a complete overhaul of their data stewardship practices, it’s important to understand key  terms, conditions, and permissions enabled by the new policy. The policy, however, will help them make decisions around management, retention, data publication, and data transfer. Implementation of this policy at a campus level is currently under development. Additional details are forthcoming.

A few key points: 

  • The Regents of the University of California own Research Data generated or collected in the course of University Research. 
    • Research Data include “recorded information embodying facts resulting from a scientific inquiry.” Research Data do not include scholarly & aesthetic works, informal notes, paper drafts, administrative or medical records, and other materials (see policy text for complete list).
    • University Research means “research conducted by a Principal Investigator or University Researcher that is within the course and scope of their assigned duties, uses University resources, and/or is funded by or through the University.”
  • University Researchers may use the Research Data they generate or collect in order to conduct other research, share with collaborators, publish outcomes, and create scholarly works. The University “supports the free and unfettered dissemination of information, knowledge, and discoveries generated by University Researchers.” As such:
    • Principal Investigators (PIs) are the stewards of Research Data, and maintain autonomy about which data should be preserved or dispositioned;
    • Researchers may share data as dictated by scholarly/disciplinary standards or data management plans, or legal, funder, or contractual requirements; 
    • When a University Researcher leaves the UC, they may take copies of the data they generated or collected, as long as it is approved by the PI;
    • Neither the University nor University Researchers may assert ownership of Research Data owned by third parties.

 

Resources and Assistance: 

 

Written by Tim Vollmer, Erin Foster, and Anna Sackmann

 


Workshop: Web Platforms for Digital Projects

Digital Publishing Workshop Series

Web Platforms for Digital Projects

Monday, October 3rd, 11:00am – 12:30pm
In-Person: Doe 223
Stacy Reardon

How do you go about publishing a digital book, a multimedia project, a digital exhibit, or another kind of digital project? In this workshop, we’ll take a look at use cases for common open-source web platforms WordPress, Drupal, Omeka, and Scalar, and we’ll talk about hosting, storage, and asset management. There will be time for hands-on work in the platform most suited to your needs. No coding experience is necessary. Register here

Upcoming Workshops in this Series – Fall 2022:

  • Creating Web Maps with ArcGIS Online
  • The Long Haul: Best Practices for Making Your Digital Project Last
  • Copyright and Fair Use for Digital Projects

 

Please see bit.ly/dp-berk for details.


NIH DMSP Frequently Asked Questions

The Library Data Services Program recently posted about the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Data Management and Sharing Policy and how it will affect UC Berkeley researchers. Please read more about the new policy on this post.

Here are a list of FAQs about the new policy. Please contact the UC Berkeley Library Data Services Program (librarydataservices@berkeley.edu) with questions.

How is UC Berkeley  responding to this policy?

The Library Data Services Program is collaborating with the Research Data Management Program to provide guidance and documentation to ensure compliance with the NIH policy.

What is considered “scientific data” for the purposes of this plan?

The final NIH Policy defines Scientific Data as: “The recorded factual material commonly accepted in the scientific community as of sufficient quality to validate and replicate research findings, regardless of whether the data are used to support scholarly publications. Scientific data do not include laboratory notebooks, preliminary analyses, completed case report forms, drafts of scientific papers, plans for future research, peer reviews, communications with colleagues, or physical objects, such as laboratory specimens.” The NIH states that “the final DMS Policy is designed to increase the sharing of scientific data, regardless of whether a publication is produced…Data that do not form the basis of a publication produced during the award period should be shared by the end of the award period.”

What is included in a Data Management and Sharing Plan?

In these max two-page documents, researchers will describe their:

  • Data type(s)
  • Related tools, software, and/or code
  • Standards
  • Data preservation, access, and associated timelines
  • Access, distribution, or reuse considerations
  • Oversight of data management and sharing

Read more about Data Management Plans and see sample language

Can I make my data available upon request?

NIH strongly prefers that scientific data be shared and preserved through repositories or, for datasets up to 2GB, through PubMed Central-deposited supplemental data files, rather than kept by a researcher and provided upon request.

How will the plans be assessed?

NIH program staff will assess the DMS plans but peer reviewers may comment on the proposed budget for data management and sharing.

What data repository should I use?

NIH encourages the use of established repositories. To select the best repository for your data consider the following:

  • Is there a specific NIH repository named in the funding announcement?
  • Is there a data repository specific to your discipline?
  • If not, is there a general data repository you can use?

To learn more, read the NIH guidance on selecting a data repository.

What is a standard? What standards are relevant to my research?

A standard specifies how exactly data and related materials should be stored, organized, and described. In the context of research data, the term typically refers to the use of specific and well-defined formats, schemas, vocabularies, and ontologies in the description and organization of data. However, for researchers within a community where more formal standards have not been well established, it can also be interpreted more broadly to refer to the adoption of the same (or similar) data management-related activities, conventions, or strategies by different researchers and across different projects.

When do I need to make my data available?

NIH encourages scientific data to be shared as soon as possible, and no later than time of an associated publication or end of the performance period, whichever comes first.

What data management and sharing costs can I include in my grant?

Allowable costs can include:

  • data curation and developing documentation (formatting data, de-identifying data, preparing metadata, curating data for a data repository)
  • data management considerations (unique and specialized information infrastructure necessary to provide local management and preservation before depositing in a repository)
  • preserving data in data repositories (data deposit fees)

Read more about allowable costs.

What happens if I do not comply with the NIH policy or make my data available as described in the DMS policy?

NIH Program Staff will be monitoring compliance with the policy during the funding period. “Noncompliance with Plans may result in the NIH ICO adding special Terms and Conditions of Award or terminating the award. If award recipients are not compliant with Plans at the end of the award, noncompliance may be factored into future funding decisions.”

I work with sensitive topics/populations – how do I protect my participants’ privacy?

NIH strongly encourages researchers who work with sensitive topics and/or populations to address data sharing in the Informed Consent process. See the UC Berkeley Human Research Protection Program’s Informed Consent page, which includes guidelines and appropriate form templates.

Researchers should pay special attention to their de-identification process to ensure that all identifying information has been fully removed. Researchers should consider depositing their data in restricted access repositories that require data use agreements and research plans in order to access the data. Contact librarydataservices@berkeley.edu if you would like guidance on selecting restricted access repositories.

Please view the UCSF’s resources on data de-identification and sharing de-identified data for additional guidance. 

 

Supplemental information from the NIH:

Responsible Management and Sharing of American Indian/Alaska Native Participant Data

Protecting Privacy When Sharing Human Research Participant Data

 

Many thanks to Ariel Deardorff at the UCSF Library for allowing us to adapt their list of Frequently Asked Questions and thank you to UC Berkeley’s Elliott Smith, Michael Sholinbeck, and Erin Foster for all of their expertise and contributions. 

 


Fall 2022 copyright and publishing workshops with the Office of Scholarly Communication Services

Graphic of Office of Scholarly Communication Services logo with a textual list of Fall 2022 workshops

With the school year kicking off this week in Berkeley, the Office of Scholarly Communication Services is here to help UC Berkeley faculty, students, and staff understand copyright and scholarly publishing with online resources, Zoom workshops, and consultations.

Here’s what’s coming up this semester.

Workshops

Publish Digital Books & Open Educational Resources with Pressbooks

Date/Time: Tuesday, September 20, 2022, 11:00am–12:30pm
RSVP for Zoom link
If you’re looking to self-publish work of any length and want an easy-to-use tool that offers a high degree of customization, allows flexibility with publishing formats (EPUB, PDF), and provides web-hosting options, Pressbooks may be great for you. Pressbooks is often the tool of choice for academics creating digital books, open textbooks, and open educational resources, since you can license your materials for reuse however you desire. Learn why and how to use Pressbooks for publishing your original books or course materials. You’ll leave the workshop with a project already under way.

Copyright and Your Dissertation

Date/Time: Tuesday, September 27, 2022, 11:00am–12:30pm
RSVP for Zoom link 
This workshop will provide you with practical guidance for navigating copyright questions and other legal considerations for your dissertation or thesis. Whether you’re just starting to write or you’re getting ready to file, you can use our tips and workflow to figure out what you can use, what rights you have as an author, and what it means to share your dissertation online.

Managing and Maximizing Your Scholarly Impact

Date/Time: Tuesday, October 11, 2022, 11:00am–12:30pm
RSVP for Zoom link
This workshop will provide you with practical strategies and tips for promoting your scholarship, increasing your citations, and monitoring your success. You’ll also learn how to understand metrics, use scholarly networking tools, evaluate journals and publishing options, and take advantage of funding opportunities for Open Access scholarship.

From Dissertation to Book: Navigating the Publication Process

Date/Time: Tuesday, October 18, 2022, 11:00am–12:30pm 
RSVP for Zoom link
Hear from a panel of experts—an acquisitions editor, a first-time book author, and an author rights expert—about the process of turning your dissertation into a book. You’ll come away from this panel discussion with practical advice about revising your dissertation, writing a book proposal, approaching editors, signing your first contract, and navigating the peer review and publication process.

How to Publish Open Access at UC Berkeley

Date/Time: Tuesday, October 25, 2022, 11:00am–12:30pm
RSVP for Zoom link 
Are you wondering what processes, platforms, and funding are available at UC Berkeley to publish your research open access (OA)? This workshop will provide practical guidance and walk you through all of the OA publishing options and funding sources you have on campus. We’ll explain: the difference between (and mechanisms for) self-depositing your research in the UC’s institutional repository vs. choosing publisher-provided OA; what funding is available to put toward your article or book charges if you choose a publisher-provided option; and the difference between funding coverage under the UC’s “transformative agreements” vs. the Library’s funding program (Berkeley Research Impact Initiative). We’ll also give you practical tips and tricks to maximize your retention of rights and readership in the publishing process.

Copyright and Fair Use for Digital Projects

Date/Time: Tuesday, November 8, 2022, 11:00am–12:30pm
RSVP for Zoom link 
This training will help you navigate the copyright, fair use, and usage rights of including third-party content in your digital project. Whether you seek to embed video from other sources for analysis, post material you scanned from a visit to the archives, add images, upload documents, or more, understanding the basics of copyright and discovering a workflow for answering copyright-related digital scholarship questions will make you more confident in your project. We will also provide an overview of your intellectual property rights as a creator and ways to license your own work.

Other ways we can help

In addition to the workshops, we’re here to help answer a variety of questions you might have on intellectual property, digital publishing, and information policy. 

Want help or more information? Send us an email. We can provide individualized support and personal consultations, online class instruction, presentations and workshops for small or large groups & classes, and customized support and training for departments and disciplines.