CLAS: Irma Alicia Velásquez Nimatuj Trade, Improvement and Survival: An Indigenous Approach to the Current Immigration “Crisis”

Center for Latin American Studies
University of California, Berkeley

 

Irma Alicia Velásquez Nimatuj. (Photo by Mello van Essen.)

Irma Alicia Velásquez Nimatuj
Trade, Improvement and Survival: An Indigenous Approach to the Current Immigration “Crisis”

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Part of the Fall 2020 Bay Area Latin America Forum · Flyer for this event

In this talk, Dr. Velásquez Nimatuj will examine the theme of migration from an indigenous perspective, within a larger context of racial oppression.

Irma Alicia Velásquez Nimatuj is a Maya-K’iche’ journalist and activist. She is an international spokeswoman for Indigenous communities in Central America and was the first Maya-K’iche’ woman to earn a doctorate in social anthropology in Guatemala. She was instrumental in making racial discrimination illegal in Guatemala and is featured in the film 500 Years.

Zoom event: REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. You will receive a confirmation email with the link and password to the event. This event will be recorded. If needed, Spanish interpretation is available by request. Interpretación al español disponible a pedido. 

If you require an accommodation for effective communication to fully participate in this event, please contact janetwaggaman@berkeley.edu with as much advance notice as possible.

Thursday, September 24, 4:00 pm Pacific Time
CLAS Virtual Event | 
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Source: Center for Latin American Studies

Primary Sources: The Guatemala Collection: Government and Church Documents for Sacatepéquez

picture of house, overlaid with The Guatemala CollectionThe Library has acquired the The Guatemala Collection: Government and Church Documents for Sacatepéquez (1587-1991).

Populated predominantly by indígenas (indigenous peoples) who speak Kaqchikel-Maya, Sacatepéquez Department offers an excellent window into Latin American and Native American history. Crucial to Guatemala’s colonial and national development, indígenas were largely discounted and denigrated. Despite such discrimination and disadvantages, many found ways to survive and thrive. Often converging at the nexus of modernization and tradition, the documents in this collection convey the complicated hybrid history of a nation striving to present itself as progressive and civilized in an Atlantic world that seldom associated those qualities with indigeneity. The Guatemala Collection houses a rich array of government, church, and civil documents that bear testimony to an indigenous population’s struggle and success with the changing social, economic, political, and religious dynamics of colonial and independent rule.

The Guatemala Collection comprises ten series. Across these ten series, the documents of the collection are organized into fifty-seven distinct classifications that include such themes as economy, agriculture, forced labor, complaints, crime, annual reports, natural disasters, municipal affairs, education, elections, military, public works, religion, public health, lands and estates, development, resignations and solicitations, regulations, festivities, and maps.

Language: Spanish