Wrapping up Women’s History Month: Selections from the Thérèse Bonney photograph collection at The Bancroft Library

The Thérèse Bonney photograph collection at The Bancroft Library consists chiefly of documentary photographs taken throughout Western Europe during World War II. Bonney (Berkeley class of 1916) photographed all aspects of the war, but focused on its effects on the civilian population. 

An active humanitarian, Bonney frequently used universal symbols in her work, allowing her images to speak beyond language barriers and leading their viewers to see beyond cultural differences. Her photographs of children were exhibited and published widely, influencing audiences to contribute to relief efforts for innocent victims of war. But the images throughout her archive feature another prominent symbol — women. Old women, young women, mothers, sisters, friends, neighbors; always at work, usually together, forever the epitome of personal sacrifice for the greater good. In honor of Women’s History Month, the Bancroft Library’s Pictorial Unit presents this collection of newly digitized images from the Thérèse Bonney Photograph Collection.  The Finding Aid to the Thérèse Bonney Photograph Collection circa 1850-circa 1955 is available through the Online Archive of California. The finding aid includes digital images for Series 6: France, Germany 1944-1946. Images for Series 3: Carnegie Corporation Trip: Portugal, Spain, France 1941-1942 are coming soon, with a preview offered here!


Trial access: Refugees, Relief, and Resettlement: Forced Migration and World War II

Until March 31, the Library has trial access to Refugees, Relief, and Resettlement: Forced Migration and World War II, which “chronicles the plight of refugees and displaced persons across Europe, North Africa, and Asia from 1935 to 1950, bringing together over 650,000 pages of pamphlets, ephemera, government documents, relief organization publications, and refugee reports that recount the causes, effects and responses to refugee crises before, during and shortly after World War II.” The records are sourced from the foreign and colonial office files in the U.K. National Archives, the U.S. State Department from the National Archives Records Administration, the British India office collection from the British Library, and the archives of World Jewish Relief.


Trial: America in World War Two: Oral Histories and Personal Accounts

American and British officers at war conferenceThe Library currently has trial access to the Adam Matthew Digital resource, America in World War Two: Oral Histories and Personal Accounts. The collections included in the digital archive are sourced from the National World War II Museum in New Orleans. The publisher states: “Our aim has been to digitize a sizeable proportion of these collections, which document the sweeping narrative of the American experience in this global conflict. In close collaboration with the Museum and with valuable input from our scholarly, editorial board, we have showcased hundreds of archive collections, oral histories and objects. For document collections we have focused on archive content, containing primarily, but not exclusively, diaries, correspondence, scrapbooks, training manuals, periodicals, albums, sketches, greetings cards and photographs. We have also included some rare books, as well as a honed selection of objects, which act as a representative sample of items in the individual collections we have chosen, as well as some choice objects featured in the museum galleries that complement our key themes.”

Access to the resource ends September 27th. During the trial you will not be able to download documents. Please send your feedback to dorner@berkeley.edu.


Primary Sources: Patriotes aux Armes! (Patriots to Arms!): The Underground Resistance in France, Belgium, Holland, and Italy, 1939-1945

cartoon by MarcellinThe Library’s recent acquisition of Patriotes aux Armes! (Patriots to Arms!): The Underground Resistance in France, Belgium, Holland, and Italy, 1939-1945 includes newspapers and periodicals, broadsides, leaflets, books, pamphlets, and other documents produced by or relating to the underground resistance in France, Belgium, Holland, and Italy. The organization of the collection housed at McMaster University Library can be found on the landing page. Links to the finding aids at the Library provide access to more detailed PDF documents that describe the holdings.


Primary Sources: Women at Work during World War II: Rosie the Riveter and the Women’s Army Corps

images from databaseA new Library acquisition is Women at Work during World War II: Rosie the Riveter and the Women’s Army Corps. This module contains two major sets of records documenting the experience of American women during World War II: Records of the Women’s Bureau of the U.S. Department of Labor, and Correspondence of the Director of the Women’s Army Corps. Primary sources document a wide range of issues pertinent to women during this time of turbulent change, including studies on the treatment of women by unions in several midwestern industrial centers, and the influx of women to industrial centers during the war. Topics covered in records and correspondence include women’s work in war industries, pivotal issues like equal pay, childcare and race, and extensive documentation on the women who joined and served in the Women’s Army Corps as WACs.


Primary Sources: Japanese American Evacuation and Resettlement Study Digital Archive

The Bancroft Library is pleased to announce the publication of the Japanese American Evacuation and Resettlement Study Digital Archive.

The result of a two-year digitization project generously funded by the National Park Service as part of the Japanese American Confinement Sites Grant Program, the digital archive makes available nearly 100,000 original manuscript items from The Japanese American Evacuation and Resettlement Study initiated in 1942 at the University of California, Berkeley. This research project sought to document the mass internment of Japanese Americans by embedding Nisei social science students recruited from the Berkeley campus into selected internment sites.

 The Japanese American Evacuation and Resettlement Study Digital Archive website provides access to this massive collection of research materials through various means, including textual searches and browsing options, visual mechanisms such as GIS tagging and interactive maps, a timeline, and pointers to related resources. The collection comprises daily journals, field reports, life histories, extensive correspondence between staff, evacuees, and others, and secondary research materials collected and compiled by the research staff.

Margo Padilla
Digital Project Archivist
The Bancroft Library


Primary Sources: Japanese American Evacuation and Resettlement Study Digital Archive

The Bancroft Library is pleased to announce the publication of the Japanese American Evacuation and Resettlement Study Digital Archive.

The result of a two-year digitization project generously funded by the National Park Service as part of the Japanese American Confinement Sites Grant Program, the digital archive makes available nearly 100,000 original manuscript items from The Japanese American Evacuation and Resettlement Study initiated in 1942 at the University of California, Berkeley. This research project sought to document the mass internment of Japanese Americans by embedding Nisei social science students recruited from the Berkeley campus into selected internment sites.

 The Japanese American Evacuation and Resettlement Study Digital Archive website provides access to this massive collection of research materials through various means, including textual searches and browsing options, visual mechanisms such as GIS tagging and interactive maps, a timeline, and pointers to related resources. The collection comprises daily journals, field reports, life histories, extensive correspondence between staff, evacuees, and others, and secondary research materials collected and compiled by the research staff.

Margo Padilla
Digital Project Archivist
The Bancroft Library