Primary Sources: Supreme Court Insight

Home page of databaseProQuest Supreme Court Insight includes full opinions from U.S. Supreme Court argued cases, including decisions, dockets, oral arguments, joint appendices, and amicus briefs from 1975-2017. (The database is still being built, so all dates are not yet covered.)

The search interface provides quick access to case histories, briefs, and landmark cases. An advanced search option provides many more options, allowing you to limit to content types, date ranges or court terms, court of origin, Justice/Opinion type, and Amicus Curiae Briefs.  You can search within the documents for names and organizations, attorney names, Justice names, petitioner names, respondent names, subject, and Supreme Court Case name.  A detailed guide provides searching advice.


Primary Sources: Women and Transnational Networks

picture of women outside a caravan

Issues of gender and class ignited nineteenth-century debate in the context of suffrage movements, culture, immigration, health and many other concerns. Using a wide array of primary source documents—serials, books, manuscripts, diaries, reports, and visuals—Women and Transnational Networks focuses on issues at the intersection of gender and class from the late-eighteenth century to the era of suffrage in the early-twentieth century, all through a transnational perspective. The collection contains deep information on European and North American movements, but also expands its scope to include collections from other regions.

Researchers and scholars will find rare content related to:

  • Social reform movements and groups
  • High and popular culture
  • Literature and the arts
  • Immigration
  • Daily life
  • Religion


Primary Sources: BAMPFA TVTV digitization project

Nany Cain operating a cameraFor the last few years, the UC Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive has been digitizing paper records and almost 450 camera-original open-reel videotapes from Top Value Television (TVTV), a 1970s “guerrilla video” collective based in the Bay Area and later Los Angeles. Highlights from the papers and all the raw footage that was digitized is now available on an interpretive website for the project.


Primary Sources: Leftist Historical Newspapers and Periodicals and Communist Historical Newspapers

ProQuest’s Leftist Historical Newspapers and Periodicals includes publications supporting the ideology of communism, most published in the United States and United Kingdom. Dates of coverage range from 1848 to 1978, with most coverage in the early 20th century. Complete runs of some publications are not available.

The Communist Historical Newspaper Collection provides full-text access to major American communist newspapers. Includes The Daily Worker (1924-1958); The Ohio Socialist (1917-1919); People’s Daily World (1986-1990); People’s Weekly World (1990-2013); Sunday Worker (1936-1958); The Toiler (1919-1922); The Worker (1922-1924); The Worker (1958-1968).


Primary Sources: Resources on South Asia

Area Studies: India is a platform for a wide range of digitized archival collections.

  • Colonial Discourses Series Three – Colonial Fiction, 1712-1933 includes fiction, poetry, drama, and general non-fiction from India, 1712-1933, sourced from the British Library.
  • Curzon, India and Empire – The papers of Lord Curzon (1859-1925) from the British Library include correspondence which documents all aspects of his involvement in the Middle East and South Asia.
  • The Empire Writes Back: Part One – Indian views on Britain and Empire, 1810-1915, from the British Library is a set of rare volumes, mainly printed in India, describing the experiences of Indians who traveled to Britain, France, and America between 1810 and 1915.
  • India During the Raj: Eyewitness Accounts – Diaries and related records describing life in India, 1712-1925.
  • India in the Age of Empire – The Journals of Michael Pakenham Edgeworth (1812-1881) from the Bodleian Library, Oxford.
  • Indian Newspaper Reports, c. 1868-1942 – These printed reports consist of precis and extracts of articles from hundreds of Indian-language titles and English titles published by Indians, compiled for and published by the Indian government.

The Library recently acquired the following U.S. State Department online archives:

India from Crown Rule to Republic, 1945-1949: Records of the US State Department

India-Pakistan Conflict: Records of the US State Department, 1963-1966 (aka Records of the U.S. State Department: India and Pakistan, Political Affairs and Relations, February 1963-1966, Subject-Numeric File POL)

Pakistan from Crown Rule to Republic: Records of the US State Department, 1945-1949

 

 


Primary Sources: Resources on Japan

Another post where I am catching up on resources we’ve acquired or have been informed of in the past year or so.

Japan at War and Peace, 1930-1949: Records of the US State Department Classified Files, which includes

  • Records of the Department of State Relating to the Internal Affairs of Japan, 1930-1939
  • Records of the Department of State Relating to the Internal Affairs of Japan, 1940-1944
  • Records of the Department of State Relating to the Internal Affairs of Japan, 1945-1949

Japanese Censorship Project
“The Library of Congress’ Asian Division has digitized its Japanese Censorship Collection, a unique online archive comprising more than 1,000 marked-up copies of government-censored monographs and galley proofs from the 1920s and 1930s in Japan. The collection, originally from the Home Ministry’s library, reveals traces of the otherwise-hidden censorship process of the Japanese government through marginal notes, stamps, penciled lines and commentary inscribed by the censors’ own hands.”

Fūzoku Gahō
This resource provides online access to a historical journal Fūzoku Gahō which was originally published in Tokyo between February 1889 and March 1916 in 518 issues with over 38,000 articles. It is said that Fūzoku Gahō was the first graphic magazine produced in Japan. The articles published on the journal cover a wide range of subjects, including social and cultural trends and conditions in the Edo, Meiji, and Taisho periods, customs, history, literature, things/objects and affairs, geography, war and disasters.
Note: There is a limit of 4 simultaneous users; if the access is denied, please try again later.


Primary Sources: Immigration and Migration resources

convoy of immigrants in trucksBorder and Migration Studies Online is a collection that explores and provides historical background on more than thirty key worldwide border areas. Featuring at completion 100,000 pages of text, 175 hours of video, and 1,000 images, the collection is organized around fundamental themes associated with border and migration issues, such as border identities, sea migration, maritime borders, etc.

Immigration Records of the INS: 1880-1930 covers the investigations made by the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) during the massive immigration wave of 1880-1930. The files cover Asian immigration, especially Japanese and Chinese migration, to California, Hawaii, and other states; Mexican immigration to the U.S. from 1906-1930, and European immigration. There are also extensive files on the INS’s regulation of prostitution and white slavery and on suppression of radical aliens.


Primary Sources: California Historical Newspapers

battleship swarmed by hungry seagullsThe Library’s recent acquisition of ProQuest’s Western Regional Historical Newspapers includes a few titles from California.

The Desert Sun (Palm Springs, CA)—1934-2011
Reno Gazette-Journal (Reno, NV)—1876-2008
The Salinas Californian (Salinas, CA)—2001-2012
San Francisco Examiner (San Francisco, CA)—1865-2007
The Spectrum (St. George, UT)—1973-2011
Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA)—1881-2009
Statesman Journal (Salem, OR)—1869-2008
Tulare Advance-Register (Visalia, CA)—2001-2007
Visalia Times-Delta (Visalia, CA)—2001-2014

Note: The contents in this database are being added through 2021, so some publications runs are as yet incomplete.

The Library has also acquired from Newsbank:

Fresno Bee 1887-2018
Sacramento Bee 1857-2018


Trial: Crime, Punishment, and Popular Culture

Until September 20th the Library has access to Gale’s online archive, Crime, Punishment, and Popular Culture, 1790-1920, comprising more than 2 million pages. It contains manuscripts, books, broadsheets, and periodicals sources from institutions in the UK and United States. Some of the printed matter is very scarce, such as Mary Fortune’s 1871 The Detective’s Album, a pioneering police procedural by a woman author, of which only two hard copies survive. Other material has been held in archives, often widely dispersed, and not always readily accessible to the researcher.


Primary Sources: Photographs from Wartime Portugal, Spain, and France

destroyed buildingNews from James Eason at the Bancroft Library: “More than two thousand digital images have just been added to the Finding Aid to the Thérèse Bonney Photograph Collection at the Online Archive of California. These images are the negative files, in their entirety, resulting from a Carnegie-funded trip Bonney made in 1941 to Portugal, Spain, and southern France. Bonney was documenting the effect of war on civilian populations, particularly children. Many images are from Franco’s Spain, with the aftermath of the Spanish Civil War starkly visible. She also took her camera to refugee camps across the French border (PerpignanRivesaltes,  and Argelès-sur-Mer), where Spanish Republican refugees were housed at the end of the civil war, and which were being repurposed when German border closures and advances threw  Europe into chaos early in World War II.”

For more on Thérèse Bonney, see the 2018 blog posting by Marjory Bryer and Sara Ferguson “Thérèse Bonney: Art Collector, Photojournalist, Francophile, Cheese Lover”,  and also Sara’s recent “Wrapping up Women’s History Month: Selections from the Thérèse Bonney photograph collection at The Bancroft Library.”