Trial: Arte Público Press Databases (EBSCO)- Ending on October 31, 2020

We are glad to announce that the UC Berkeley Library has started trials of Arte Público Hispanic Historical Collection: Series 1 and Arte Público Hispanic Historical Collection: Series 2 that have been hosted by EBSCO. (Please click on the hyperlinks above to access the resources).

Combined search has been enabled by the library. And the trials are good through October 31, 2020. Please click on the icon below to start your searches. If you are accessing from an off-campus location, please make sure that the proxy or VPN are set up.

EBSCO’s Arte Público Hispanic Historical Collection is an archive of publications focused exclusively on U.S. Hispanic history, literature and culture from colonial times until 1960. Available in two series, Series 1 focuses on the creative life of U.S. Latinos and Hispanics. Content is written, indexed and searchable in Spanish and English.

Arte Público Hispanic Historical Collection: Series 2
Arte Público Hispanic Historical Collection is an archive of publications focused exclusively on U.S. Hispanic history, literature and culture from colonial times until 1960. Available in two series, Series 2 focuses on Hispanic American civil rights, religion and women’s rights from the 18th through the 20th century. Content is written, indexed and searchable in Spanish and English.

There are multiple sources included in these databases.

 

 


Primary Sources: Leftist Historical Newspapers and Periodicals and Communist Historical Newspapers

ProQuest’s Leftist Historical Newspapers and Periodicals includes publications supporting the ideology of communism, most published in the United States and United Kingdom. Dates of coverage range from 1848 to 1978, with most coverage in the early 20th century. Complete runs of some publications are not available.

The Communist Historical Newspaper Collection provides full-text access to major American communist newspapers. Includes The Daily Worker (1924-1958); The Ohio Socialist (1917-1919); People’s Daily World (1986-1990); People’s Weekly World (1990-2013); Sunday Worker (1936-1958); The Toiler (1919-1922); The Worker (1922-1924); The Worker (1958-1968).


Workshop: The Long Haul: Best Practices for Making Your Digital Project Last

The Long Haul: Best Practices for Making Your Digital Project Last
Tuesday, September 22nd, 11:00am-12:00pm
Online: Register to receive the Zoom link
Scott Peterson and Erin Foster

You’ve invested a lot of work in creating a digital project, but how do you ensure it has staying power? We’ll look at choices you can make at the beginning of project development to influence sustainability, best practices for documentation and asset management, and how to sunset your project in a way that ensures long-term access for future researchers. Register at bit.ly/dp-berk

Upcoming Workshops in this Series 2020:

  • Web Platforms for Digital Projects
  • Copyright and Fair Use for Digital Projects

Please see bit.ly/dp-berk for details.


Primary Sources: Resources on South Asia

Area Studies: India is a platform for a wide range of digitized archival collections.

  • Colonial Discourses Series Three – Colonial Fiction, 1712-1933 includes fiction, poetry, drama, and general non-fiction from India, 1712-1933, sourced from the British Library.
  • Curzon, India and Empire – The papers of Lord Curzon (1859-1925) from the British Library include correspondence which documents all aspects of his involvement in the Middle East and South Asia.
  • The Empire Writes Back: Part One – Indian views on Britain and Empire, 1810-1915, from the British Library is a set of rare volumes, mainly printed in India, describing the experiences of Indians who traveled to Britain, France, and America between 1810 and 1915.
  • India During the Raj: Eyewitness Accounts – Diaries and related records describing life in India, 1712-1925.
  • India in the Age of Empire – The Journals of Michael Pakenham Edgeworth (1812-1881) from the Bodleian Library, Oxford.
  • Indian Newspaper Reports, c. 1868-1942 – These printed reports consist of precis and extracts of articles from hundreds of Indian-language titles and English titles published by Indians, compiled for and published by the Indian government.

The Library recently acquired the following U.S. State Department online archives:

India from Crown Rule to Republic, 1945-1949: Records of the US State Department

India-Pakistan Conflict: Records of the US State Department, 1963-1966 (aka Records of the U.S. State Department: India and Pakistan, Political Affairs and Relations, February 1963-1966, Subject-Numeric File POL)

Pakistan from Crown Rule to Republic: Records of the US State Department, 1945-1949

 

 


Primary Sources: Resources on Japan

Another post where I am catching up on resources we’ve acquired or have been informed of in the past year or so.

Japan at War and Peace, 1930-1949: Records of the US State Department Classified Files, which includes

  • Records of the Department of State Relating to the Internal Affairs of Japan, 1930-1939
  • Records of the Department of State Relating to the Internal Affairs of Japan, 1940-1944
  • Records of the Department of State Relating to the Internal Affairs of Japan, 1945-1949

Japanese Censorship Project
“The Library of Congress’ Asian Division has digitized its Japanese Censorship Collection, a unique online archive comprising more than 1,000 marked-up copies of government-censored monographs and galley proofs from the 1920s and 1930s in Japan. The collection, originally from the Home Ministry’s library, reveals traces of the otherwise-hidden censorship process of the Japanese government through marginal notes, stamps, penciled lines and commentary inscribed by the censors’ own hands.”

Fūzoku Gahō
This resource provides online access to a historical journal Fūzoku Gahō which was originally published in Tokyo between February 1889 and March 1916 in 518 issues with over 38,000 articles. It is said that Fūzoku Gahō was the first graphic magazine produced in Japan. The articles published on the journal cover a wide range of subjects, including social and cultural trends and conditions in the Edo, Meiji, and Taisho periods, customs, history, literature, things/objects and affairs, geography, war and disasters.
Note: There is a limit of 4 simultaneous users; if the access is denied, please try again later.


Primary Sources: Immigration and Migration resources

convoy of immigrants in trucksBorder and Migration Studies Online is a collection that explores and provides historical background on more than thirty key worldwide border areas. Featuring at completion 100,000 pages of text, 175 hours of video, and 1,000 images, the collection is organized around fundamental themes associated with border and migration issues, such as border identities, sea migration, maritime borders, etc.

Immigration Records of the INS: 1880-1930 covers the investigations made by the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) during the massive immigration wave of 1880-1930. The files cover Asian immigration, especially Japanese and Chinese migration, to California, Hawaii, and other states; Mexican immigration to the U.S. from 1906-1930, and European immigration. There are also extensive files on the INS’s regulation of prostitution and white slavery and on suppression of radical aliens.


Primary Sources: California Historical Newspapers

battleship swarmed by hungry seagullsThe Library’s recent acquisition of ProQuest’s Western Regional Historical Newspapers includes a few titles from California.

The Desert Sun (Palm Springs, CA)—1934-2011
Reno Gazette-Journal (Reno, NV)—1876-2008
The Salinas Californian (Salinas, CA)—2001-2012
San Francisco Examiner (San Francisco, CA)—1865-2007
The Spectrum (St. George, UT)—1973-2011
Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA)—1881-2009
Statesman Journal (Salem, OR)—1869-2008
Tulare Advance-Register (Visalia, CA)—2001-2007
Visalia Times-Delta (Visalia, CA)—2001-2014

Note: The contents in this database are being added through 2021, so some publications runs are as yet incomplete.

The Library has also acquired from Newsbank:

Fresno Bee 1887-2018
Sacramento Bee 1857-2018


Trial: Crime, Punishment, and Popular Culture

Until September 20th the Library has access to Gale’s online archive, Crime, Punishment, and Popular Culture, 1790-1920, comprising more than 2 million pages. It contains manuscripts, books, broadsheets, and periodicals sources from institutions in the UK and United States. Some of the printed matter is very scarce, such as Mary Fortune’s 1871 The Detective’s Album, a pioneering police procedural by a woman author, of which only two hard copies survive. Other material has been held in archives, often widely dispersed, and not always readily accessible to the researcher.


Primary Sources: Photographs from Wartime Portugal, Spain, and France

destroyed buildingNews from James Eason at the Bancroft Library: “More than two thousand digital images have just been added to the Finding Aid to the Thérèse Bonney Photograph Collection at the Online Archive of California. These images are the negative files, in their entirety, resulting from a Carnegie-funded trip Bonney made in 1941 to Portugal, Spain, and southern France. Bonney was documenting the effect of war on civilian populations, particularly children. Many images are from Franco’s Spain, with the aftermath of the Spanish Civil War starkly visible. She also took her camera to refugee camps across the French border (PerpignanRivesaltes,  and Argelès-sur-Mer), where Spanish Republican refugees were housed at the end of the civil war, and which were being repurposed when German border closures and advances threw  Europe into chaos early in World War II.”

For more on Thérèse Bonney, see the 2018 blog posting by Marjory Bryer and Sara Ferguson “Thérèse Bonney: Art Collector, Photojournalist, Francophile, Cheese Lover”,  and also Sara’s recent “Wrapping up Women’s History Month: Selections from the Thérèse Bonney photograph collection at The Bancroft Library.”


Workshop: Publish Digital Books & Open Educational Resources with Pressbooks

Publish Digital Books & Open Educational Resources with Pressbooks
Tuesday, September 15th, 10:00am-11:30am
Online: Register to receive the Zoom link
Tim Vollmer and Stacy Reardon

If you’re looking to self-publish work of any length and want an easy-to-use tool that offers a high degree of customization, allows flexibility with publishing formats (EPUB, MOBI, PDF), and provides web-hosting options, Pressbooks may be great for you. Pressbooks is often the tool of choice for academics creating digital books, open textbooks, and open educational resources, since you can license your materials for reuse however you desire. Learn why and how to use Pressbooks for publishing your original books or course materials. You’ll leave the workshop with a project already under way! Register at bit.ly/dp-berk

Upcoming Workshops in this Series 2020:

  • The Long Haul: Best Practices for Making Your Digital Project Last
  • Web Platforms for Digital Projects
  • Copyright and Fair Use for Digital Projects

Please see bit.ly/dp-berk for details.