Primary Sources: Manchurian Daily News Online

logo for collectionThe Library has recently acquired the digital archive of the Manchurian Daily News and associated publications Manchuria Magazine, Manchuria Month, Contemporary Manchuria, and the Manchurian Information Bulletin. As described on the Brill website, this resource “offers scholars of Japan’s modern history an unparalleled inside view of Japan’s agenda in Manchuria and its plans for domination in Asia. Founded in 1908 in the wake of Japan’s victory in the war against Russia, the Manchuria Daily News set up in Dalian (Darien) at the headquarters of the South Manchuria Railway Company (Minami Manshū Tetsudō Kabushiki-gaisha) (SMR).
“Lavishly funded from Tokyo, and with the full resources of the SMR Research Department behind them, the Manchuria Daily News and the associated titles offered here constitute a formidable record of Japanese policy on Manchuria and the Manchoukuo project. From 1908-1940 this compact, feisty daily and its associated titles responded to the exigencies of the day, taking requests from a variety of official and often competing propaganda bureaux. In the Manchuria Daily News and in these associated publications, the SMR presented a powerful case for the Japanese leadership of Asia, after 1932 using Manchoukuo as a showcase for Japan’s technological, cultural and political advancement.”


Primary Sources: Moscow News Digital Archive

Front page of Moscow Daily News issue The Library has recently acquired access to Moscow News (pub. 1930-2014), which, as described on the database platform, “was the oldest English-language newspaper in Russia and, arguably, the newspaper with the longest democratic history. From a mouthpiece of the Communist party to an influential advocate for social and political change, the pages of Moscow News reflect the shifting ideological, political, social and economic currents that have swept through the Soviet Union and Russia in the last century.

“The Moscow News Digital Archive contains all obtainable published issues (1930-2014, approx. 60,000 pages), including issues of the newspaper’s short-lived sister publication Moscow Daily News (1932-1938).

“The Moscow News Digital Archive offers scholars the most comprehensive collection available for this title, and features full page-level digitization, complete original graphics, and searchable text, and is cross-searchable with numerous other East View digital resources.”


Trial: Newspapers and Associated Press collections

cover of magazine ap worldUntil October 20, 2017, the Library has trial access to the following resources:
Associated Press Collections including,
Associated Press: European Bureaus Collection
Associated Press: Middle Eastern Bureaus Collection
Associated Press: News Features & Internal Communications
Associated Press: US City Bureaus Collection
Associated Press: Washington Bureau II Collection
Associated Press: Washington/D.C. Bureau Collection

Daily Mail Historical Archive
International Herald Tribune
The Telegraph Historical Archive, 1855-2000

Your feedback on the usefulness of these is greatly appreciated.


Resources from the Center for Research Libraries

CRL resources
A political pamphlet from the People’s Republic of China, 1949; Illinois Public Records Project, 1942; Bosnian nationalist newspaper, Zagreb, 1995.

The UC Berkeley Library is a member of the Center for Research Libraries (CRL), a partnership of more than 200 university, college, and independent research libraries. CRL acquires and preserves newspapers, journals, government documents, archives, and other primary source materials from a global network of sources, making them available to researchers through interlibrary loan and digital delivery.

CRL’s deep and diverse holdings support research in the history of science, economics, law and government, immigration and population studies, international diplomacy, and cultural studies.

  • Largest collection of circulating newspapers in North America (more than 16,000 titles with strengths in various global areas and historical U.S. ethnic titles)
  • Primary legal and government resources, including foreign and U.S. state documents
  • Over 800,00 foreign dissertations (mostly from European institutions) dating back to the 1800s
  • Area studies materials—major microform and paper collections from Africa, Latin America, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, South Asia, and Southeast Asia

CRL functions as a branch library of extraordinary resources with user-focused services.

  • Rapid turnaround of loan requests and project-length loan privileges from CRL’s five million items
  • Digitized collections offering over 50 million pages scanned by request or in partnerships
  • Document delivery of articles from the Linda Hall Library of Science, Engineering, and Technology
  • Demand purchase of new materials in three areas of collection strength: foreign dissertations, newspapers, and microform archives

For more information on CRL collections: CRL’s online catalog (holdings are also listed in WorldCat and in some cases in OskiCat)

Center for Research Libraries - Global Resources Network

For more information about the CRL: please contact  Liladhar R. Pendse
(Lpendse (at) library.berkeley.edu), UCB Library coordinator for the CRL.


Primary Sources: Latin American Anarchist and Labour Periodicals (c. 1880-1940) Online

page of newspaper The Library has recently acquired Latin American Anarchist and Labour Periodicals (c. 1880-1940) Online, a collection of 971 titles held at the International Institute of Social History (IISH) in Amsterdam. As described on the website, the “collection contains numerous rare, and in many cases unique, titles. It consists of periodicals accumulated by the Austrian anarchist, historian and collector Max Nettlau (1865-1944), together with a number of later additions. Included, among many others, are the Argentine periodicals La Protesta, La Vanguardia and Acción Obrera; the Brazilian O Exempio, Jornal do Povo and Battaglia; the Chilean Voz del Mar; and the Mexican Ariete, Redención Obrera, Revolución Social and El Sindicalista.”

This resource has been added to the Latin American History guide.


Trial: San Francisco Chronicle 1869-1984

The Library has a trial for the NewsBank digital archive of the San Francisco Chronicle, covering 1869-1984. This includes 61 years not covered by our purchase of the ProQuest digitized San Francisco Chronicle.

You can access the paper until November 9 through this link:

http://infoweb.newsbank.com/?db=EANX-NB&s_browseRef=decades/142051F45F422A02/all.xml

Please send your feedback to me at dorner@berkeley.edu.


Trial: U.S. Jewish Newspaper Collection

Man and girl on streetThe Library has a trial of the U.S. Jewish Newspaper Collection from ProQuest, which includes:

The American Hebrew & Jewish Messenger (1857-1922)
The American Hebrew was a weekly Jewish newspaper published in New York City. In 1903 it merged with the Jewish Messenger. The paper covered many topics of Jewish interest internationally. Many prominent Jewish writers and communal workers in the United States have been contributors to its pages.

The Jewish Advocate (1905-1990)
The Jewish Advocate serves as a primary source of news and information as well as a forum for discussion and debate, providing lines of communication uniting the community and supporting the efforts aimed at reinvigorating and broadening Jewish religious and cultural life.

The American Israelite (1854-2000)
The American Israelite is the longest-running English-language Jewish newspaper still published in the United States. The newspaper’s two goals were to spread the principles of Reform Judaism, and to keep American Jews in touch with Jewish affairs and their religious identity.

Jewish Exponent (1887-1990)
The Jewish Exponent has carried news of developments in Israel, efforts to rescue Jews the world over from repressive regimes, and the ever-expanding role of Jews in American public life. Along the way, it has garnered honors each year from the American Jewish Press Association for excellence in Jewish journalism for its news, features, reviews and commentary.

The trial will run through October 7, 2016. Your feedback to dorner@berkeley.edu about the usefulness of this resource would be appreciated.

 

 

 


Trial: The Telegraph Historical Archive 1855-2000 – access through June 17


The Library has access to a trial of The Telegraph Historical Archive 1855-2000 through June 17, 2016.

Description from the vendor’s website:

“Launched in 1855, The Telegraph was the first 1d morning paper (The Times was 7d). By 1876, The Telegraph was the largest-selling newspaper in the world, with a circulation of 300,000. The newspaper was directed at a wealthy, educated readership and is commonly associated with traditional Toryism, despite its more ‘liberal’ beginnings. However, this shifted in the late 1870s, when the newspaper began to support British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli over the Eastern Question.

“Under the editorship of poet and Orientalist Edwin Arnold from 1873 to 1899, the newspaper published widely on foreign affairs and foreign cultures. This led to The Telegraph’s coverage of Henry Morton Stanley’s expedition to Africa in search of David Livingstone, which it co-sponsored with the New York Herald in 1874. Its dedication to foreign news coverage was evidenced by its employment of several renowned special correspondents over the years; Winston Churchill, who reported from India in 1897, Rudyard Kipling, who braved the trenches of the First World War, and Clare Hollingworth, who, as the first female war correspondent, relayed the start of the Second World War from Poland.

“During the twentieth century, The Telegraph cemented its reputation as a pioneering yet reliable source of news reporting. There was the infamous uncensored interview with Kaiser Wilhelm of 1908, in which the German chancellor successfully alienated Britain, France, Russia, and Japan. In 1942, the newspaper published the cryptic crossword puzzle responsible for recruiting Allied codebreakers during the Second World War.

The Telegraph’s commitment to lively copy was matched by its desire to position itself at the forefront of journalistic innovation; it published the first crossword to appear in a newspaper in 1925, the first television column in 1935, and became the first British newspaper to launch a website in 1994.

“The publication of The Telegraph is generally seen by press historians as the start of a new era of journalism that emerged following the repeal of the stamp duty, marking the first step towards the mass-market journalism of the Daily Mail. This makes The Telegraph Historical Archive, 1855-2000 a valuable addition to Gale’s coverage of the ‘quality’ UK press, providing an important alternative voice to its other national UK dailies such as The Times and The Independent.

“The Telegraph Historical Archive, 1855-2000 has over 1 million pages of content and includes the Sunday edition from its inception in 1961. The archive offers a fundamental insight into domestic and international affairs and culture over a timespan of almost 150 years.”


Primary Sources: Independent Voices

cover of Berkeley Barb issue

Independent Voices is a digital collection of magazines, journals, newspapers, and newsletters housed in the alternative and small press archives of participating libraries and historical institutions.

The focus is on materials published during the 1960s-1980s that stem primarily from the second wave of feminism, LGBT activism, GI and student protest movements, and the Black, Chicano(a), and Native American movements.


Primary Sources: Japan Times Archives

Another recent acquisition of the Library is the digital Japan Times Archive, which provides access to the complete run (1897-2014) of this English-language daily published in Tokyo.

The archive contains a reported 490,000 pages of content, from 30,000 issues published over the 117-year history of the newspaper. The Japan Times was the first English-language newspaper in Japan to be put out by Japanese publishers and was for many years the only foreign-language newspaper in Japan. The paper maintained editorial independence for much of its history, though it was used as a propaganda tool for Imperial Japan during World War II. The paper went through occasional title changes, all of which are represented in the archive. The contents include:

The Japan Times (22 Mar 1897–1 Jan 1918)
The Japan Times & Mail (2 Apr 1918–10 Nov 1940)
The Japan Times & Advertiser / Japan Times Advertiser (11 Nov 1940–31 Dec 1942)
Nippon Times (1 Jan 1943–30 Jun 1956)
The Japan Times (1 Jul 1956–present)

Full text searching is enabled because the content has been OCR’d, but as with most digitized newspapers the OCR process is not error-free. You should be flexible in your searching and try variations of words. Read the help information to learn how to construct searches with *, +, and # operators.