Library Prize Exhibit Fall 2019 about Female Stationers

 

Image of Exhibit Case.
Items in the Library Prize exhibit in Doe Library are photographed on Nov. 15, 2019. (Photo by Violet Carter for the UC Berkeley Library)

“I held the work of female printers like Elizabeth Cellier, one of my case studies. In doing so, I discovered small details that reshaped my thesis.” – Claire Danna

This reflection came after Claire Danna completed “And as to my own Sex”: The Networks and Rhetoric of Unity Between Female Stationers in the 17th Century, for which she earned the prestigious 2019 Charlene Conrad Liebau Library Prize for Undergraduate Research, an annual prize awarded to students who have completed exceptional research and made significant use of the Library’s resources. Claire wrote her paper for her Honors Research Seminar (English H195A and H195B) under the advisement of Professor Janet Sorensen. 

Claire’s paper is the subject of this semester’s rotating Library Prize Exhibit, located on the second floor of Doe Library between the Heyns Reading Room and the Reference Hall. Drawing on texts in the Main Stacks and resources from the Bancroft Library, the exhibit showcases key texts used by Danna as she explored the experiences of women printers in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The exhibit includes: a digitized replica of the title page of Elizabeth Cellier’s Malice Defeated (1680); a modern laser cut depicting Cellier’s trial created by Annalise Phillips, the Library’s Maker Education Service Lead; a composing stick with historically appropriate text set by Les Ferriss, Master Printer; and Claire’s notebook and notes used to keep track of her sources and their connections. The exhibit was co-curated by Nicole Brown, Head, Instruction Services Division and Gisele Tanasse, both members of the Library Prize Committee and designed by Aisha Hamilton, the Exhibits and Environmental Graphics Coordinator. The exhibit will be up until April 2020.

Special thanks to: 

Annalise Phillips, Maker Education Service Lead, who you can find at the Moffitt Makerspace

Les Ferriss, Master Printer, who teaches The Hand-Printed Book in Its Historical Context

Peter Hanff, and the staff of the Bancroft Library 

Library Imaging Services staff, who digitize the Library’s treasured collections

Image of exhibit case.
Items in the Library Prize exhibit in Doe Library are photographed on Nov. 15, 2019. (Photo by Violet Carter for the UC Berkeley Library)

 

Image of Exhibit Case.
Items in the Library Prize exhibit in Doe Library are photographed on Nov. 15, 2019. (Photo by Violet Carter for the UC Berkeley Library)

The Charlene Conrad Liebau Library Prize for Undergraduate Research is awarded annually, and submissions are now open to all undergraduates until April 16, 2020. In addition to a monetary award of $750 for lower-division winners and $1000 for upper-division winners, the recipients of the Library Prize publish their work in eScholarship, and two will be featured in an exhibit in the Library. Find out more information, including how to apply.

Learn about the rest of this year’s winners and honorable mentions. Be sure to stop by the exhibit to see Claire’s work in person. You can replicate Claire’s research journey by searching Early English Books Online (EEBOO)


New Display Case in Environmental Design Library

Environmental Design Library Exhibit Case

With the help of Semar Prom and the College of Environmental Design Fabrication Shop staff, the Environmental Design Library has installed a new display case.  The new case will allow for informal display of artists’ books, the library’s rare books, and timely topical information relevant to the college.  Currently on display are items from the upcoming 10/25/19 Hands On Artists’ Book event featuring newly acquired artists’ books.


Library Prize Exhibit: Sympathy for the Loss of a Comrade

By Adam Clemons

In early July of 1873, a soldier named John Taylor reported to the hospital at Fort Stockton, Texas complaining of illness. The fort’s doctor, Peter J.A. Cleary, refused to treat him. Instead, he sent Taylor to the guard house as punishment. Three days later John Taylor was dead. Taylor’s fellow soldiers, incensed by what they believed to be racially motivated medical neglect by Cleary, drafted a statement detailing the patterns of abusive treatment of Taylor and calling for a formal investigation into his death. The officers at Fort Stockton responded by placing twenty-one of the soldiers who signed the letter, mostly non-commissioned officers, on trial for attempted mutiny. Though the charge was ultimately downgraded to a failure to follow proper procedure, twenty out of the twenty-one charged soldiers were dishonorably discharged and sent to prison in Huntsville, Texas.

Nicholas Eskow's paper, "Sympathy for the Loss of a Comrade" is the subject of this semester’s rotating Library Prize Exhibit, located on the second floor of Doe, photographed on May 29, 2019. (Photo by Jami Smith for the UC Berkeley Library)
Library Prize exhibit for Nick Eskow’s winning paper.
Nicholas Eskow's paper, "Sympathy for the Loss of a Comrade" is the subject of this semester’s rotating Library Prize Exhibit, located on the second floor of Doe, photographed on May 29, 2019. (Photo by Jami Smith for the UC Berkeley Library)
1868 copy of A Treatise of Miliary Law and Practice of Courts-Martial by S.V. Benet
"Sympathy for the Loss of a Comrade" is the subject of this semester’s rotating Library Prize Exhibit, located on the second floor of Doe, photographed on May 29, 2019. (Photo by Jami Smith for the UC Berkeley Library)
A scan of the original petition letter, dated July 12th, 1873
Photos by Jami Smith for the UC Berkeley Library

In “Sympathy for the Loss of a Comrade: Black Citizenship and the 1873 Fort Stockton ‘Mutiny’,” Nick Eskow successfully reconstructed the events at Fort Stockton using library resources such as period publications, government documents, newspapers, and archival collections. Where others have relied on the accounts of the white officers to tell this story, Eskow sought out the perspective of the black soldiers through extensive research and analysis of the historical record. Eskow’s exceptional effort earned him the prestigious 2018 Charlene Conrad Liebau Library Prize for Undergraduate Research, an annual prize awarded to students who have done high-level, course-based research while demonstrating significant use of the Library’s resources.

Eskow’s research is also the subject of the rotating Library Prize Exhibit, located on the second floor of Doe Library between Heyns Reading Room and Reference Hall. Drawing on collections held at UC Berkeley, Fort Stockton, Texas, and the National Archives in Washington, D.C., the exhibit displays some of the documents Eskow used to capture the voice of the black soldiers including a digital version of the original petition letter, which includes a few pages of soldiers’ signatures to show the “X” marks by many names. These marks, meant to stand for “his mark,” indicates that many of the soldiers, who were former slaves, could not sign their names and implies that they could neither read nor write. Other documents on display include an 1868 copy of S.V. Benet’s A Treatise on Military Law and Practice of Courts-Martial, which was repeatedly cited by the white officers at Fort Stockton to support their charge against the black soldiers as well as a detailed timeline of the events at Fort Stockton from the death of John Taylor to the sentencing of the twenty soldiers who signed the petition letter.

The Charlene Conrad Liebau Library Prize for Undergraduate Research is awarded annually to UC Berkeley undergraduates. Any course-based research projects completed at UC Berkeley during the award year are eligible. In addition to a monetary prize for winners – $750 for lower division and $1000 for upper division – award recipients as well as honorable mentions will publish their research in eScholarship, the University of California’s open access publishing platform. Two of the winners are also be featured in an exhibit in the Library.

The exhibit – which was curated by Adam Clemons, Librarian for African and African American Studies, and designed by Aisha Hamilton, Exhibits and Environmental Graphics Coordinator – will be up until November 2019.

 

New Instagram feed for Romance Language Collections


 UC Berkeley Romance Language Collections

The new Romance Language Collections Instagram feed brings forth little known and new resources and services in the UC Berkeley Library. Once you start following you’ll instantly receive early notices of new books, e-resources, exhibits, readings and more through your smartphone.


Exhibit: Immigration, Deportation and Citizenship, 1908-2018: Selected Resources from the IGS and Ethnic Studies Libraries

Refugees are welcome here“Immigration, Deportation and Citizenship, 1908-2018: Selected Resources from the IGS and Ethnic Studies Libraries” contains items from the Ethnic Studies Library and the Institute of Governmental Studies Library addressing historical attitudes and policy around immigration, deportation, and citizens’ rights, as well as monographs and ephemera relating to current events.

IGS Library
109 Moses Hall
Mon.-Fri.1-5pm

Please see the accompanying Library Guide for a key to the exhibit as well as additional materials:

https://guides.lib.berkeley.edu/c.php?g=856448


New exhibit: Immigration, Deportation and Citizenship, 1908-2018

Images from the new immigration exhibit

Immigration, Deportation and Citizenship, 1908-2018: Selected Resources from the IGS and Ethnic Studies Libraries” contains items from the Ethnic Studies Library and the Institute of Governmental Studies Library addressing historical attitudes and policy around immigration, deportation, and citizens’ rights, as well as monographs and ephemera relating to current events.

See accompanying Library Guide.

Location: IGS Library – 109 Moses Hall
Dates: Fall semester 2018
Open hours: Monday – Friday, 1pm-5pm


Event: Opening of Library Exhibit ” “Vida y Resistencia en el Territorio Mapuche, Chile”

flier for event This Friday, March 9, the Library will open an exhibit co-sponsored by the CLAS working group, the Wallmapu Support Committee. “Vida y Resistencia en el Territorio Mapuche, Chile” (Life and Resistance in the Mapuche Territory) can be viewed on the 3rd floor of Moffitt Library from March 9 – June 30, 2018.

The opening event is scheduled Friday from 5 pm – 6:30 pm in 303 Doe Library. There will be a short musical performance and some presentations by Chilean and Mapuche community members from the Bay Area.


COLLECTIONS as CONNECTORS Holdings from Off-Center

by Steven Black, Bancroft Acquisitions

Things fall apart; the center cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world…
–William Butler Yeats, from “The Second Coming”

As they do in a teeming metropolis, connections occur naturally among collections in libraries and other repositories. These linkages may involve ideas and people, whether by description (cataloging and metadata), archival arrangement, researcher access and review, or, in the case of a new exhibit at The Bancroft Library, by time-shifted serendipity.

“The Summer of Love, from the Collections of The Bancroft Library” fortuitously brings together two representative figures who, in 1967, circled each other warily, but never met.

Joan Didion
Joan Didion in Golden Gate Park’s Panhandle, near Oak and Ashbury, 1967, photographed by Ted Streshinsky, BANC PIC 2004.132–NEG, M674-2, frame 9A

Joan Didion’s reportage in “Slouching Towards Bethlehem” is highlighted in a timely Bancroft exhibition along with images of the hippie scene in San Francisco taken by photographer Ted Streshinsky.

One thread running through her piece (in a reproduction of her typescript essay as submitted for later book publication) is a search for the Communication Company printer and publisher Chester Anderson.

Chester Anderson
Photo of Chester Anderson from the back cover of The Butterfly Kid. New York : Pyramid Books, 1967., p PS3551.N358 B8 1967

Funded by proceeds from his cult-hit novel The Butterfly Kid (1967), Anderson arrived in the Haight district of San Francisco just as the seeds for the coming “Summer of Love” were sown.  In January 1967 he purchased a state-of-the-art mimeograph machine from Gestetner “to provide quick & inexpensive printing service for the hip community.”

Among the works issued by this newest member of the Underground Press Syndicate were innumerable Diggers flyers and handbills, a chapbook by Richard Brautigan (All Watched Over By Machines of Loving Grace), revolutionary manifestos, notices for performances, the Invisible Circus, other happenings, and street level public service announcements.

Gentleness: a play in infinite acts ., 1967, The Communication Company, publisher Chester Anderson papers, BANC MSS 92/839 c, box 1, folder 3

In her quest, Didion describes meeting Com/Co’s co-founder, who (she writes) “says his name is Claude Hayward, but never mind that because I think of him just as The Connection.”

As she is on assignment for a mainstream publication, Didion is considered (in a Diggers phrase-du-jour) to be “a media poisoner.” The Connection urges her to dump the photographer she is with “and get out on the Street” leaving her cash (“You won’t need money”) behind.

Responding to her request to speak directly with Chester Anderson, The Connection says:  “If we decide to get in touch with you at all, we’ll get in touch with you real quick.” Although she crosses paths with The Connection again that spring in the Panhandle during an agitprop intervention by the San Francisco Mime Troupe, his passive refusal to hook her up rebuts his street-inflected nickname.

Joan Didion was unable to find the oracular man who could ostensibly help her understand “the scene,” or genius loci. Despite this missed connection with Chester Anderson, by detailing her forays into the Haight-Ashbury and other hippie enclaves around San Francisco, Didion captured in prose a time in violent flux. “Slouching” became the title essay of her celebrated first book of non-fiction, securing her reputation as a caustic and insightful social seismograph.

janis didion excerpt
Joan Didion papers, BANC MSS 81/140 c, carton 1

Today their works are co-located in Bancroft’s Summer of Love retrospective: two radically different writers can be seen in a long-delayed meeting that eluded them in real life.

*                          *                          *

Provenance notes:

Joan Didion (1934-) Joan Didion’s manuscript (BANC MSS 81/140 c carton 1) came to The Bancroft Library as a gift of the author.

Chester Valentine John Anderson (1932-1991) Chester Anderson’s papers (BANC MSS 92/839 c) came to The Bancroft Library via friend and fellow underground journalist Paul Williams.

Paul Williams (1948-2013) founded Crawdaddy, the first zine of rock and roll journalism (predating Rolling Stone), authored many works of hippie (Apple Bay: or, Life on the planet) and new age journalism (Das Energi), books on Bob Dylan and Philip K. Dick (whose literary executor he was, for close to 20 years). Through his imprint Entwhistle Books, he published two books by Chester Anderson:  Fox & hare : the story of a Friday night (f PS3551.N358 F6 1980 Bancroft) and Puppies (p PS3572.A395 P9 1979 Bancroft) under Anderson’s pseudonym John Valentine.

Ted Streshinsky (1923–2003) Ted Streshinsky’s photo archive (BANC PIC 2004.132) was a gift of his wife Shirley.


Ecocity Berkeley: Thirty Years On

Woman watering a garden planted inside a car

September 15 – December 15, 2017
Environmental Design Library – 210 Wurster Hall

In 1987 Richard Register released his first major book, Ecocity Berkeley: Building Cities for a Healthy Future, inserting “ecocity” into the urban planning lexicon. Using Berkeley as a test bed, he promoted a new vision for urban development; his ideas and drawings presaged a number of contemporary design elements, tuning architecture and urban design to nature’s and human needs and desires. This exhibit explores his inspiring vision and its international influence.