Featured resource: Guides to November 6 ballot measures

The Institute of Governmental Studies Library has released guides to the 11 ballot measures on the November 6 general election ballot. The ballot measure guides, as well as resources on the gubernatorial and U.S. senate races, are featured on the IGS website at:

https://igs.berkeley.edu/library/election-guides

In addition to voter resources and descriptions of the propositions and candidates, the site features Endorsements tables where you can compare endorsements from political parties, newspapers, and other organizations.

Ballot Measure Endorsements
Governor Endorsements
U.S. Senate Endorsements

For more info, contact Paul King: pking@berkeley.edu or Julie Lefevre: jlefevre@berkeley.edu


Movies @ Moffitt: El Mar La Mar

El Mar La Mar movie poster

El Mar La Mar
A film by J.P. Sniadecki

Wednesday, October 3, 2018
Doors @ 6:30pm, show @ 7:00pm
405 Moffitt Library
Free; open to UCB students only (UCB student ID required)

“An immersive and enthralling journey through the Sonoran Desert on the U.S.-Mexico border, EL MAR LA MAR weaves together harrowing oral histories from the area with hand-processed 16mm images of flora, fauna and items left behind by travelers. Subjects speak of intense, mythic experiences in the desert: A man tells of a fifteen-foot-tall monster said to haunt the region, while a border patrolman spins a similarly bizarre tale of man versus beast. A sonically rich soundtrack adds to the eerie atmosphere as the call of birds and other nocturnal noises invisibly populate the austere landscape.

Emerging from the ethos of Harvard’s Sensory Ethnography Lab, J.P. Sniadecki’s attentive documentary approach mixes perfectly with Joshua Bonnetta’s meditations on the materiality of film. Together, they’ve created an experience of the border region like nothing you’ve seen, heard or felt before.” — CinemaGuild

View the trailer and visit the website.


Mindfulness at Moffitt

Students in a mindfulness class at Moffitt Library

Overcome insomnia & stress.  Focus the mind. Foster creativity, resiliency & well-being. No previous experience required. Open to students, staff, and faculty in the Cal community (UCB ID required to enter Moffitt Library). For the mindfulness-curious to novices and experts. Weekly practice or drop in.

October – December
Mondays, 12-1 p.m.
5th Floor Moffitt in the Wellness Room
.

For more information: contact Gisele Tanasse at gtanasse@library.berkeley.edu


October 4: Lunch Poems with Fady Joudah

Fady JoudahThursday, October 4
12:10 p.m. – 12:50 p.m.
Morrison Library in Doe Library
Admission Free

Fady Joudah’s fourth and most recent poetry collection is Footnotes in the Order of Disappearance. He is the recipient of a Yale Younger Poets prize, a Guggenheim Fellowship, Lannan Residency, and the Griffin International Poetry prize. He is the translator of several volumes of Arabic poetry into English. He is also a practicing physician of internal medicine in Houston, TX.

 


Apply now: Moffitt Library Student Advisory Council

A meeting of the Moffitt Student Advisory CouncilWhat is it?

The Moffitt Library Student Advisory Council consists of student representatives who meet regularly with Doe/Moffitt Library staff to advise the library on policies, services, collections and spaces.

Council members:

  • Advise in the design and implementation of library policies and services affecting students
  • Offer student perspectives on relevant library issues
  • Gather input from other Cal students,
  • Inform the design and policies for the renovation of Moffitt Library
  • Represent the Berkeley Library at campus events and meetings
  • Serve as advocates for the library among the Cal student body

The Council consists of undergraduate students who bring a diversity of perspectives, academic experiences, and personal backgrounds.  Students must currently be registered at the University of California, Berkeley and in good academic standing.

What is expected of members?

Your role as a member will be to offer insights about how the library can best support students’ educational experience at Berkeley. Members provide an informed student perspective on policies, services, collections and spaces; participate in development of surveys and other assessment tools; and represent the Berkeley Library at local events and meetings.

Members are asked to contribute their ideas and opinions and respectfully consider other ideas brought to the Council. With a primary focus on the renovation of Moffitt Library, members are expected to be informed about the project and the planning completed to date.

The term of service is one academic year, with possible renewal of the appointment. Meetings are generally held several times per semester and are approximately 2 hours. There are likely to be other opportunities to participate through focus groups, online surveys, library events, and contributions to online forums such as the Moffitt LibraryFacebook page.

What would I get from the experience?

Serving on the Council will provide an opportunity to share with the library administration concerns of highest priority to students. Participation can provide connections for future references; be an opportunity to meet new friends and help create the kind of Berkeley community students want. You will be an influencing voice in shaping the library services and spaces important to you and your peers.

How do I apply?

Undergraduates can volunteer through an online application.  Interested students with questions about the Council may contact Jean Ferguson, Learning and Research Communities Librarian at  jean.ferguson@berkeley.edu.


Summer reading: Summer Lighting

Summer Lightning book cover

Summer Lightning
P.G. Wodehouse

It’s not just P.G. Wodehouse’s hilarious wordplay shot through the story that makes Summer Lightning such a treat, but equally the marvelously crazy, kind of sweet, and always and ever idiosyncratic British world you get to enter when you pick up one of his books. But a warning: Don’t read this on public transportation because too much laughing might startle one’s fellow passengers.

For a curious modern reader, Wodehouse’s books brim with tempting allusions from the literature and popular culture of the Edwardian era, the 1910s, the Jazz Age, and all the literature an English schoolboy of the time would have had to read. Take for instance Lord Emsworth’s niece Millicent Threepwood in Summer Lightning. She is a classic Wodehouse heroine — feisty, pretty, sometimes terrifyingly capable, but absolutely volatile and a little insane (those last two traits — like every other Wodehouse character).

Nor will Summer Lightning disappoint Wodehouse fans as a class, because it has its wonderful share of 1. broken engagements, 2. purloined items, 3. butlers. Last, just by the way, see the Wikipedia article on the Empress of Blandings, the book’s pig. Especially read the parenthetical words under the pig’s picture; they seem to have been written by a true Wodehouse aficionado.

That’s it for the 2018 Summer Reading List! Tune in again next summer for more great reads.


New exhibit: Immigration, Deportation and Citizenship, 1908-2018

Images from the new immigration exhibit

Immigration, Deportation and Citizenship, 1908-2018: Selected Resources from the IGS and Ethnic Studies Libraries” contains items from the Ethnic Studies Library and the Institute of Governmental Studies Library addressing historical attitudes and policy around immigration, deportation, and citizens’ rights, as well as monographs and ephemera relating to current events.

See accompanying Library Guide.

Location: IGS Library – 109 Moses Hall
Dates: Fall semester 2018
Open hours: Monday – Friday, 1pm-5pm


September 6: Lunch Poems kickoff!

A poetry reading in the Morrison LibraryThursday, September 6
12:10 p.m. – 12:50 p.m.
Morrison Library in Doe Library
Admission Free

Hosted by Geoffrey G. O’Brien, this event features distinguished faculty and staff from a wide range of disciplines introducing and reading a favorite poem. This year’s participants: Steven Black (Bancroft Library), Catalina Cariaga (School of Law), Cindy Cox (Music), David Marno (English), Claude Potts (Doe Library), Director Amy Scharf (Faculty and Departmental Diversity Initiatives), Ula Taylor (African American Studies), Raymond Telles (Ethnic Studies & the Center for Latino Policy Research), and Nancy Tran (Doe/Moffitt Library).


Summer reading: Self-Compassion

Self-compassion book cover

Self-Compassion: The Proven Power of Being Kind to Yourself
Kristin Neff

Self-Compassion by Kristin Neff is a book of shining light, inspiration, and hope that I wish had been available when I began my college career. In her last year of graduate study in the doctoral program in psychology at UC Berkeley, Neff began attending Buddhist meditation meetings to deal with major stress. A central concept of Buddhist thought that she learned from the meditation group, self-compassion, resonated deeply for her. Her weekly Buddhist sessions were “a lifesaver,” influencing her to the point where self-compassion became the primary focus of her research and, later, her university teaching. She is now an Associate Professor of Human Development and Culture in the Educational Psychology Department at the University of Texas at Austin.

Here is an example of one of the pearls of wisdom from Self-Compassion that is relevant to anyone about to embark on, or deeply within, their academic careers: “Because our culture demands that we perceive ourselves as ‘special and above average,’ we routinely engage in an egoistic process of social comparison with others. When we’re deeply invested in seeing ourselves positively, we tend to feel threatened if others do better than we do.” She counters this tendency by saying, “Like it or not, the main way we learn is by falling flat on our face, just as we did when we first learned to walk…If we were perfect and had all the answers, we’d never get to ask questions, and we wouldn’t be able to discover anything new.” I wish I had understood that when I was 18.

Infinitely readable, Self-Compassion is a book to return to again and again for guidance and wisdom.

This book is part of the 2017 Berkeley Summer Reading List. Stay tuned for more weekly posts!


Movies @ Moffit: Rat Film

Image from the movie Rat Film

Rat Film
A film by Theo Anthony

Wednesday, September 5, 2018
Doors @ 6:30pm, show @ 7:00pm
405 Moffitt Library
Free; open to UCB students only (UCB student ID required)

Across walls, fences, and alleys, rats not only expose our boundaries of separation but make homes in them. “Rat Film” is a feature-length documentary that uses the rat–as well as the humans that love them, live with them, and kill them–to explore the history of Baltimore. “There’s never been a rat problem in Baltimore, it’s always been a people problem”.