Workshop: Web Platforms for Digital Projects

Digital Publishing Workshop Series

Web Platforms for Digital Projects

Monday, October 3rd, 11:00am – 12:30pm
In-Person: Doe 223
Stacy Reardon

How do you go about publishing a digital book, a multimedia project, a digital exhibit, or another kind of digital project? In this workshop, we’ll take a look at use cases for common open-source web platforms WordPress, Drupal, Omeka, and Scalar, and we’ll talk about hosting, storage, and asset management. There will be time for hands-on work in the platform most suited to your needs. No coding experience is necessary. Register here

Upcoming Workshops in this Series – Fall 2022:

  • Creating Web Maps with ArcGIS Online
  • The Long Haul: Best Practices for Making Your Digital Project Last
  • Copyright and Fair Use for Digital Projects

 

Please see bit.ly/dp-berk for details.


Great Reads for Hispanic Heritage Month

This month, find great works of recently published Latinx literature in the Library’s collection! Starting September 15th, Hispanic Heritage Month begins as we both celebrate the myriad achievements of Latinx communities and call recognition to their struggles.

Recommendations to add? Tell us on Twitter!



Summer reading: Turn the Ship Around!

Book cover for Turn the Ship Around Turn the Ship Around! A True Story of Turning Followers into Leaders
L. David Marquet

WHY–We live in a world filled with anger and grievance over conflicting notions about the relationship between individuals and communities. That relationship is defined by notions of liberty, a word that is not a synonym for freedom, for liberty requires duties. But “liberty” is not the same in time. In classical antiquity, fascism, and post-communist autocracies, the individual is subordinate to a community, so liberty reflects the collective’s freedom from impurity or attack. In modern times, commerce supersedes violence as a way of allocating goods, so liberty is defined by the actions and desires of individuals. Give too much leave to individuals, and you get nihilism and fragmentation. Give too much leave to community, and you get stultification and totalitarianism. Thus, we must learn to live within a dialectical tension. And you will need to understand its contradictions so as to cut its Gordian knots. To that end, two readings on theory and one on practice.

YIN–A liberal comparison of ancient versus modern liberty: Benjamin Constant’s 15-page essay titled “The Liberty of Ancients Compared with that of Moderns” (1819).

YANG–A deeply conservative version of the same: Leo Strauss’ 49-page essay titled “The Liberalism of Classical Political Philosophy” (1959.) (electronic copy requires CalNet authentication)

BANG–A book about how a commander on a nuclear submarine changed a top-down martinet culture into a community of leaders: L. David Marquet’s 274-page book titled Turn the Ship Around! A True Story of Turning Followers into Leaders (2013).

ARTURO PEREZ-REYES
Professional Faculty
Haas School of Business

That’s it for this year’s Summer Reading! Tune in again next year!


Celebrating Pasolini’s 100th Birthday

5 books by Pasolini

Italian film director, poet, writer and intellectual Pier Paolo Pasolini (1922-1975) would have turned 100 this year and Italy is not the only country celebrating his artistic achievements. Here in the Bay Area, the Italian Cultural Institute of San Francisco will present a series of public events exploring his life, his work, and his legacy during the months of September and October. The Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMFA) has organized a retrospective of his films beginning the last week of October and continuing through November.

The UC Berkeley Library is home to 172 books authored or co-authored by Pasolini, 440 critical works about him, and 41 DVDs. In the Media Resources Center which is available by appointment only this semester, you’ll find more of his films than on Netflix, Amazon Prime, and Kanopy combined.

Calendar of Events:

September 1, 2022 – 11 AM
PIER PAOLO PASOLINI CORSARO Pier Paolo Pasolini Corsair
Marco Belpoliti presents his book Pasolini e il suo doppio (Pasolini and His Double)
In collaboration with the Leonardo Da Vinci Society SF
Venue: Zoom presentation
LEARN MORE & REGISTER

September 10, 2022
PASOLINI100 – HOMAGE TO PIER PAOLO PASOLINI FILM MARATHON
Experience the passion of Pasolini, the filmmaker who pushed the boundaries of politics, art and sexuality, at a screening of five of his most iconic films at the Castro Theatre. The retrospective will feature a special screening of Pasolini’s Medea starring soprano Maria Callas, and, in celebration of the joint centenaries of San Francisco Opera and Pasolini, San Francisco Opera will present a performance by soprano Mikayla Sager prior to the Medea screening.
This program is presented by Cinecittà, the Italian Cultural Institute of San Francisco, CinemaItaliaSF, and Artistic Soul Association, under the auspices of the Italian Consulate General of San Francisco.
Venue: The Castro Theatre
LEARN MORE & BUY TICKETS

October 5, 2022 – 6:30 PM
LA ROSADA E L’ARGILUT: The Places of Young Pasolini
A documentary exploring the places where Pier Paolo Pasolini lived and worked in his youth passing through the villages and countryside that the poet loved so deeply and depicted in his poetic and visual work.
Produced by Terra s.r.l. and directed by Roberta Cortella.
In cooperation with Regione Friuli Venezia Giulia and Association El Fogolar Furlan SF
Length: 35 min
Venue: Italian Cultural Institute of San Francisco @INNOVIT Spaces
Free admission, limited seating available
LEARN MORE & REGISTER

October 25, 2022 – 6:30 PM
ATREMIS DANZA | FUOCHI SEGRETI (Secret Fires)
A contemporary dance performance in celebration of Pasolini100
A production of Compagnia Artemis Danza/Monica Casadei, with the support of Ministero della Cultura, Regione Emilia Romagna
Presented by the Italian Cultural Institute of San Francisco
Venue: Brava Theatre, 2781 24th St., San Francisco
Free admission, limited seating available
LEARN MORE & REGISTER

October 22-November 27, 2022
PASOLINI RETROSPECTIVE @BAMPFA Berkeley
Copresented by BAMPFA and Cinecittà, Rome. The retrospective has been organized by Susan Oxtoby, BAMPFA, and Camilla Cormanni, Paola Ruggiero, Marco Cicala, Germana Rusico, Cinecittà. Presented in association with the Ministry of Culture of Italy.
LEARN MORE & BUY TICKETS

Accatone by Pier Paolo Pasolini
Accattone by Pier Paolo Pasolini (Italy, 1961)

Summer reading: Whole Earth Catalog

Book cover for Whole Earth Catalog The Whole Earth Catalog
Stewart Brand, editor

The Whole Earth Catalog is a publication full of marvels that reveals a time in the world when a generation was seeking and creating all the implements for living. While it was being published, it was about how to live and make a new world on planet Earth – with a vision that arose from the alternative ideologies and DIY zeitgeist of the 1960’s in California and elsewhere. The catalog called itself a “tool for living.” Its goal was to open up all the esoteric, folk, or professional knowledge in the world so everyone could learn how to create whole, sustainable lives.

It is a catalog in the sense that it has products, contact information, and vendors and publications small and large, but it’s maybe really a dream for everyday people seeking to learn how to do everything from living off the land to hunting mushrooms; to building dome houses; to handling emergency childbirth; to buying a space clock; to how to open communication with other intelligent life in the universe; or where to find cheap government surplus pickup trucks. It had mailing addresses for absolutely everything, like where to send away for earth for building houses; where to order a copy of The Très Riches Heures of Jean, Duke of Berry, or a copy of Man’s Role in Changing the Face of the Earth, etc., etc., etc. It also contained insets of short essays (by Ken Kesey, for one), and funky illustrations (by R. Crumb, for one) written by idiosyncratic people about the new kind of living. The catalog’s products and illustrations are magical for people chasing a world of love and food and machinery and freedom and…everything. Quoted purpose of the Whole Earth Catalog: “We are as gods and might as well get good at it.”

JEAN DICKINSON
Slavic, E. European, and Central Asian Catalog & Metadata Librarian

This book is part of the 2022 Berkeley Summer Reading List. Stay tuned for more weekly posts!


Workshop: Publish Digital Books & Open Educational Resources with Pressbooks

Digital Publishing Workshop Series

Publish Digital Books & Open Educational Resources with Pressbooks
Tuesday, September 20th, 11:00am-12:30pm
Online: Register to receive the Zoom link
Tim Vollmer

If you’re looking to self-publish work of any length and want an easy-to-use tool that offers a high degree of customization, allows flexibility with publishing formats (EPUB, PDF), and provides web-hosting options, Pressbooks may be great for you. Pressbooks is often the tool of choice for academics creating digital books, open textbooks, and open educational resources, since you can license your materials for reuse however you desire. Learn why and how to use Pressbooks for publishing your original books or course materials. You’ll leave the workshop with a project already under way! Register here

Upcoming Workshops in this Series – Fall 2022:

  • Web Platforms for Digital Projects
  • Creating Web Maps with ArcGIS Online
  • The Long Haul: Best Practices for Making Your Digital Project Last
  • Copyright and Fair Use for Digital Projects

 

Please see bit.ly/dp-berk for details.


Summer reading: The Great Bay

Book cover for The Great Bay The Great Bay
Dale Pendell

The Great Bay, a novel by Dale Pendell (1947-2018), opens with humanity on the threshold of collapse of the planetary anthropogenic infrastructure based on technology and fossil fuel. A global pandemic driven by a microbe with very high contagion and very high mortality has dramatically reduced the world’s population. The pandemic is over after the first few pages and the remainder of the book explores the aftermath – and what an extraordinary exploration it is. The geographic feature that gives the book its title, the Great Bay, formed over several centuries of melting polar ice, rising sea levels, and heavy rain. It is what will certainly happen in central California when sea level rises even a relatively small amount – a large inland bay will form, connected to the Pacific Ocean by way of the Sacramento River, present-day San Francisco Bay, and the Golden Gate. This Great Bay forms a geographic centerpiece and anchor for the stories of community that take place in that region, although the stories have universal significance. In the course of thousands of years, as human civilization reconstitutes after its precipitous collapse, it does so in smaller communities and without a focus on technology. Such a focus might not even be possible, given that the relatively easily accessible mineral resources we have enjoyed for centuries would have been exhausted. Thus, different aspects of the human psyche are cultivated, and what might be called spiritual or shamanic connections with reality are developed to a high level. Less technology, more shamanism, a resulting different metaphysical frame on the nature of mind, all contribute to a vastly different course for civilization, and a vastly different take on reality.

DAVID PRESTI
Teaching Professor of Neurobiology and Psychology
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

This book is part of the 2022 Berkeley Summer Reading List. Stay tuned for more weekly posts!


Summer reading: The Nutmeg’s Curse

Book cover for The Nutmeg's CurseThe Nutmeg’s Curse
Amitav Ghosh

In this deeply researched and beautifully written book, Amitav Ghosh convincingly argues that our current planetary climate crisis is the predictable outcome of centuries of Western, resource-driven colonialism, along with the concomitant marginalization and sometimes extermination of Indigenous cultures. This geopolitical world order – which early on focused on the commodification of nutmeg and other spices, followed by tea, sugarcane, opium, and finally fossil fuels – continues to this day. Our current crises – of climate, community, and spirit – can be seen as the result of a mechanistic view of the Earth, one where nature exists primarily as a resource for humans to exploit, rather than as a living force filled with agency and meaning. The book ends on a hopeful note of bringing attention to the re-enlivening of nature, a way of thinking about the geosphere and biosphere that takes seriously the world views of the Indigenous cultures that have suffered tremendously in the course of this history. My favorite book of 2021.

DAVID PRESTI
Teaching Professor of Neurobiology and Psychology
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

This book is part of the 2022 Berkeley Summer Reading List. Stay tuned for more weekly posts!


Summer reading: Minor Feelings

Book cover for minor feelingsMinor Feelings
Cathy Park Hong

Like many poets turned essayists, Kathy Park Hong’s attention to language at the granular level makes her writing especially barbed in its critiques of American racism, and rich in observational detail. Her essay collection Minor Feelings: An Asian American Reckoning leads readers through layers of the “minor feelings” of the title, and helps readers to understand the complicated position Asian Americans occupy in a society that so often tokenizes or fails to understand the diversity of Asian American experience and identity. By engaging readers in thinking about the concept of shame and how it works, Hong also becomes a voice helping to liberate a community from feeling that same sense of shame.

KAYA OAKES
Lecturer
College Writing Programs

This book is part of the 2022 Berkeley Summer Reading List. Stay tuned for more weekly posts!


Summer reading: Voices from the Warsaw Ghetto

Book cover for voices from the warsaw ghettoVoices from the Warsaw Ghetto: Writing Our History
David G. Roskies, editor

How does one bear witness to a community being destroyed? What Emanuel Ringelblum did in Warsaw in the early 1940s was to create a community of chroniclers. Folks from various walks of life–poets, rabbis, activists, and others–were brought together under the moniker “Oyneg Shabes” (Joy of Sabbath), and urged to write of the “ordinary” lives in the Warsaw ghetto, quite literally as the Nazis were attempting to exterminate Jewish communities across Europe. Life then was hardly “ordinary” but many daily events (horrific as they were) were captured in these essays; the manuscripts were then placed into metal milk cans, which miraculously were preserved until unearthed after the war. Nearly all of the essayists perished in the Shoah (Holocaust). This book provides a window into life in the Warsaw ghetto and includes jokes, drawings, stories, poems, and essays about tailors, children, teachers, smugglers…a general cross-section of society there. What makes this book so gripping is the immediacy of the essays. Ringleblum encouraged the essayists to write in the here and now: what is happening at this very moment. The hope was, and is, that hearing of the plight of Warsaw’s Jewish residents would help us all to prevent future atrocities; a task, I’m afraid, that has not been successful.

MICHAEL SHOLINBECK
Public Health Librarian/Optometry Liaison
Bioscience, Natural Resources, & Public Health Library