CP2OA results are in: Open access efforts are taking flight

This photo depicts a sign pointing forum participants to discussion rooms.
At the Choosing Pathways to Open Access Forum, participants discussed ways to develop plans for repurposing subscription funds to support open access publishing. This photo depicts a sign pointing forum participants to discussion rooms. (Photo by Jami Smith for the UC Berkeley Library)

 

On October 16-17, 2018, University of California (UC) libraries hosted a working forum in Berkeley, California, called Choosing Pathways to Open Access (CP2OA). Sponsored by the University of California’s Council of University Librarians (CoUL), the forum was designed to enable North American library and consortium leaders and key academic stakeholders to engage in action-focused deliberations about redirecting subscription and other funds toward sustainable open access (OA) publishing.

More than 120 participants arrived from more than 80 institutions, nearly 30 states, and four Canadian provinces. The goal was for everyone to leave with their own customized plans for how they will repurpose subscription spends within their home organizations or communities—and more broadly, through collective efforts, move the OA needle forward.

CP2OA was admittedly a gamble: Could library stakeholders spend two days immersed in a design thinking process, wrestling with the nitty-gritty of numerous OA funding strategies, then depart with actionable steps for making OA a reality? When CoUL approved the forum, they charged the Planning Committee (that’s us) not only with putting the forum together, but also with reporting back to them about whether this grand experiment worked. We have followed up with participants and analyzed the data, and the results are clear: Through CP2OA, the UC libraries have helped to inspire meaningful change.

With that, we hereby announce our Planning Committee’s report to CoUL analyzing forum outcomes. To keep CP2OA momentum going, our report also synthesizes forum outcomes into recommendations for further collective action by CoUL to advance OA. The report’s recommendations reflect our personal opinions as Planning Committee members, and are not an official statement by CoUL, nor should publication of this report be seen as CoUL’s endorsement of our recommendations. We are thrilled that CoUL will be considering our recommendations at its upcoming June meeting, and further note that some of our recommendations reflect efforts already underway within various UC libraries.

We encourage you to check out the full report to see why the format of CP2OA was so successful, and to learn more about everything it inspired. We also understand you may just want the highlights, so … without further ado:

CP2OA Forum Outcomes

Two months after the forum, we surveyed participants about their perceptions of the forum, and any actions they had taken as a result of having participated. Our survey response rate was approximately 48% (58 responses), and revealed the following:

  • Perceptions of the forum were almost universally positive, with some participants describing the forum as “exceptional,” “highly effective,” “energizing and motivating,” and a “model for how we should be engaging professionally.” Participants found the forum structure particularly conducive to enabling action.
  • Though just two months had passed between the CP2OA forum and the time when we polled participants, more than 75% of responding participants reported having taken action toward advancing open access. Fifty percent (50%) of those who took action embarked upon what we categorized as “concrete” actionsthat is, express steps such as starting pilots, undertaking publishing data analyses, and negotiating with publishers. The remaining 50% undertook at a minimum conversations and outreach within or external to their libraries.
  • Some examples of concrete next steps included: (1) formation of a group providing consultations and support for transitioning society publications to open access (http://www.tspoa.org); (2) first OA investment by an institution that had not yet formally engaged with OA; (3) commitment to requiring OA in upcoming license negotiations with a STEM publisher; (4) formation of OA values statements to guide institutional investment; (5) pursuit of transformative (e.g., offsetting or “read and publish”) agreements through which an institution’s publications are made OA as part of an overall subscription license agreement; (6) building OA publishing into promotion and tenure considerations; and (7) increased institutional repository deposits and outreach.

Planning Committee’s Recommendations to CoUL

In advance of considering our recommendations this summer, CoUL has already approved some right off the bat, including:

  • Making available the CP2OA Planning Committee’s report and all CP2OA public-facing documentation so that other institutions can have a blueprint for replicating or tailoring CP2OA to their needs. CoUL also approved a second round of CP2OA reporting so the Planning Committee could check in on forum participants’ progress later in the year.
  • Continuing CoUL’s efforts to develop a public toolkit to support other institutions seeking to engage in “big deal” (large subscription journal package) re-negotiations that include OA components, and/or to engage more generally in transformative (e.g., offsetting/read-and-publish) agreements.

In June, CoUL will be addressing the other proposals in our report, including:

  • Engaging the UC academic senate with OA in promotion and tenure
  • Expanding institutional staffing and support for identification and evaluation of, and decision-making relating to, OA publishing investments and transforming the scholarly publishing landscape
  • Dedicating collections funds across campuses to be used for supporting OA publishing
  • Funding new data analyst positions to provide further inward-facing support for data-driven OA investments by UC libraries as well as outward-facing consultative support to the community beyond UC
  • Collective investment in UC Press OA publishing
  • Increasing support for monograph subventions for UC authors
  • Collective investment in transformative cooperatives or non-APC approaches to OA publishing
  • Committing to enhancing eScholarship, including expansion of OA publishing services
  • Exploring opportunities for collective investment in open source infrastructure to support OA publishing

We will keep the community updated about how CoUL responds to these recommendations, as well as any UC collective next steps.

In the meantime, we hope you will share in some of the excitement that CP2OA has generated and continue your own journeys toward helping to transform our scholarly publishing ecosystem.

Onward to open access!

Signed,

  • Rachael Samberg (UC Berkeley; CP2OA Co-chair)
  • Donald Barclay (UC Merced)
  • John Renaud (UC Irvine)
  • Lisa Schiff (California Digital Library)
  • Allegra Swift (UC San Diego)
  • Anneliese Taylor (UCSF)
  • Mat Willmott (California Digital Library)

Primary Sources: LGBT Magazine Archive

Cover of Tapestry magazine The Library recently gained access to the LGBT Magazine Archive, a searchable collection of digitized periodicals devoted to LGBT+ interests. A work in progress, the resource will include 26 U.S. and U.K. titles, covering the 1950s through to recent years. Currently there are 11 titles available. Due to the rarity of some original print volumes, there are small gaps in the runs of some publications.


Art on Earth

Explore the changing world through the artist’s lens with recent publications on art and its role in relation to climate change.   You can find these titles in Doe Main Stacks, the Environmental Design Library, or online.  Click the links below to view their OskiCat records.

 

Art and Future                                                  Anthropocene                              Artistic Visions of the Anthropocene North

Ecological Aesthetics                                                        Ecologies Agents Terrains                                          Eco-Visionaries

Endangered Species                                    Interrogating the Anthropocene                              Landscape into Eco Art


April Brings New Books in Art History

You can find these and other new art history acquisitions on the New Books shelf in the Art History / Classics Library.

At Home                                                                     Inka Essenhigh                                         Pedro Correia De Araujo

Mesdag & Japan                               The Ideas, Identity and Art of Daniel Spoerri                        Caspar de Crayer

Shaping the American Interior                              Border Spaces                                      Innovative Impressions


Ferlinghetti at 100

by Steven Black, Head of Acquisitions

Lawrence and Kirby Ferlinghetti, 1959

From across San Francisco Bay, the explosion of civic pride that is being expressed in the lead-up to Lawrence Ferlinghetti’s 100th birthday (March 24) is felt in Berkeley, and in particular at The Bancroft Library.  As the proud repository of Lawrence Ferlinghetti’s literary archive, as well as records of his publishing house City Lights Books, generations of Library staff have been privileged to meet with Ferlinghetti over the years.

In 1996, Bancroft hosted the symposium “Ferlinghetti, City Lights, and the Beats in San Francisco: From the Margins to the Mainstream” which was followed by the Friends of The Bancroft Library keepsake  The poet’s eye : a tribute to Lawrence Ferlinghetti, edited by Richard Ogar.

 

City Lights Books

 

More recently, Bancroft’s curator of Rare Books and Literary Manuscripts is seen here with Ferlinghetti in 2016 to arrange the acquisition of the most recent installment of his papers.

David Faulds and Lawrence Ferlinghetti

One interesting characteristic of the poet’s creative method is the use of reporter’s notebooks in the composition of his verses, which recalls these oft-quoted lines from William Carlos Williams:   “It is difficult/ to get the news from poems/ yet men die miserably every day/ for lack// of what is found there” !

“One Stream of Consciousness” in Reporter’s Notebook

Far from resting on his well-earned laurels, Ferlinghetti has marked this milestone month with the publication of a new novel, Little Boy, released just this week.


New Books by Black Authors for Black History Month

Black History Monthby Taylor Follett

February 2019 marks the celebration of Black History Month in the United States, and the perfect opportunity to read recently published works by Black authors! 2018 (and the beginning of 2019) saw some wonderful novels, poetry collections, memoirs and more. Check out some of the major works published in the past year from the library below.

Continue reading “New Books by Black Authors for Black History Month”


New exhibition: Illustrating México One Page at a Time: Print Art of José Guadalupe Posada

Title of Exhibit: Illustrating México One Page at a Time: Print Art of José Guadalupe Posada

Time: 9 a.m.-10 p.m. (regular Moffitt hours on Saturdays)

Location: Moffitt Library gallery, 3rd floor

Description:

In the pantheon of artists who have represented Mexico for the past 150 years, José Guadalupe Posada stands out as a bright constellation. This exhibit, highlighting works by Posada and his artistic descendants, was curated by Liladhar Pendse, librarian for the Caribbean and Latin American Studies Collections, using Doe Library materials. See more at exhibits.lib.berkeley.edu/spotlight/art-of-posada.


New Books in Literature

Welcome back for a new semester! With new classes and a new year come new books at the library. The books we recently received have something for everyone—whether you’re looking for poetry, prose, or criticism.

Check out the rest of the new acquisitions!

Want a book that we don’t have in the library? Request it here.



February 7: Lunch poems with Ari Banias

Ari BaniasThursday, February 7
12:10 p.m. – 12:50 p.m.
Morrison Library in Doe Library
Admission Free

Ari Banias is the author of Anybody (W.W. Norton, 2016), which was named a finalist for the Kate Tufts Discovery Award and the PEN Center USA Literary Award. His poems have appeared in various journals, in Troubling The Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry and Poetics, and as part of the MOTHA exhibitionTransgender Hirstory in 99 Objects. He is the recipient of fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, and Stanford University’s Wallace Stegner program. Ari lives in Berkeley, teaches poetry, and works with small press books.