Building distinguished collections one title at a time: Part 1-Revista PAN (Colombia)

Each month, we will document our activities geared towards building distinguished collections at UC Berkeley Library one title at a time. Usually, American libraries are proud of their already existing large, diverse, and the great body of print items.  But with the same token, given the robust digital technologies and the Interlibrary Loan platforms, the need for building certain types of analog collections is rightfully contested.

When it comes to the 19th century North American imprints, many libraries have them sitting on the shelves as a sort of legacy records despite many of these being accessible in HathiTrust in their digital avatars. As we take great pride in our past, we must secure our future while learning from the experiences the present offers. Despite the debates, the fact remains that the libraries take great pride in their distinguished collections that set them apart. To this end, we are making conscious efforts- COVID or no COVID-19; life continues.

I am glad to report that we have acquired the following difficult to find Colombian journal for the library.

Pan : [Organo de un centro sin nombre] No. 1 (agosto 1935)-no. 36 (mayo 1940) / editor Enrique Uribe White. –Cali : Editorial América, 1935-1940 .– 1a ed.–  illustrations (algunas a color), charts ; 25 cm.–

COLECCIÓN COMPLETA. 36 NUMEROS. MUY DIFICIL DE ENCONTRAR COMPLETA.

Todos los Numeros encuadernados. Los No. 1, 2 y 3 encuadernados en un solo volumen.

Esta revista incluye artículos de política, historia, filosofía, cuentos, ensayos, viajes, poesía, ciencia, notas varias y transcripciones.

Se destaco por ser un medio de difusión del arte colombiano y escenario donde algunos intelectuales de aquel momento manifestaron sus apreciaciones acerca de lo que ellos concebían como arte a través de comentarios y artículos

Por sus páginas pasaron pintores, escultores, dibujantes , caricaturistas y fotógrafos: óleos, dibujos e ilustraciones (algunas a color) de Ignacio Gómez Jaramillo, Luis Alberto Acuña, José Rodríguez Acevedo, Pedro Nel Gómez, Carlos Correa, Gonzalo Ariza, Salas Vega, Villaveces, Dolcey Vergara; pasteles de José Posada; acuarelas y caricaturas de Rendón; ilustraciones de Schloss, Scandroglio, Martínez Delgado, Rodríguez Cubillos, Ramón Ba rba, Rómulo Rozo, Gómez Campuzano, Achury Valenzuela, Félix Timmermans, P . Daguet, Carolina Cárdenas de Jaramillo; grabados en madera de Frans Masereel y témperas de Guillermo Jaramillo.


Joventut: periódich catalanista: literatura, arts, ciencias

Joventut (Barcelona: Janer-Febrer, 1900) from HathiTrust

Few books and journals in the Library stay in the same place forever. Berkeley’s copy of the renowned Art Nouveau periodical, Joventut published between 1900 and 1906 and directed by Alexandre de Riquer and Lluís Vía under the auspices of the “Unio Catalanista” has recently migrated from the Art History/Classics Library to The Bancroft Library for safekeeping. Antiquarian bookdealer Peter Bernett describes the journal as “a major forum for the presentation and reviews of ‘modernista’ literature, criticism, theater, music, and visual art in Barcelona and greater Catalonia, as well as discussing current aesthetic trends in Europe.” An extension of the Renaixença cultural and literary movement with inspiration from the Pre-Raphaelites, it featured cutting edge art, architecture and literature. In its first year of publication it was the first review to reproduce a work by Picasso. The ornamental golden binding was inspired by Aubrey Beardsley’s The Yellow Book. Catalan poets, novelists and playwrights such as Jacint Verdaguer, Joaquim Ruyra, and Victor Català — who will soon be featured in The Languages of Berkeley online exhibition —were among the regular contributors.

Joventut has been digitized separately by the Biblioteca de Catalunya and the Getty Research Institute, available through the HathiTrust Digital Library and The Internet Archive.

Drawing by [Pablo] Ruiz Picasso in Joventut from HathiTrust

New Resource: Almandumah Arabic Database

database logoAlmandumah is a comprehensive full text database for Arabic scholarly output. It includes almost one million items (1/3 in abstract), including about 1900 unique Arabic journals, 2500 conferences, and 200,000 dissertations from the Arab world. It consists of 6 specialized databases: AraBase for language and literature, IslamicInfo for Islamic studies and Islamic law, HumanIndex for humanities, EcoLink for economic and management studies, EduSearch for education, and Dissertations and Thesis which includes full text and abstracts for about 200,000 (1/2 in abstracts) from 170 schools across the Arab world. The database covers the Arabic scholarly output since 1920 until present.


The sweetest journal in the Library

A back issue of an award-winning bilingual cultural journal from Portugal was brought to our attention earlier this week. Usually librarians only become involved with journal receipts when they haven’t been arriving regularly, prices have increased or formats have changed but this special issue of Egoísta was like no other I had seen before. It came with a small bag of hard red candies and the cover was designed to hold them them in place. Clearly there was a connection between the issue’s theme on doce (sweet) but can you imagine the environmental risks that might ensue if we left the candies attached to the journal and housed them with the rest of the print resources in the Main Stacks? Happy Valentine’s Day!

Claude Potts
Librarian for Romance Language Collections


Primary Sources: American Antiquarian Society (AAS) Historical Periodicals Collection

The Library recently acquired the complete digital archive of the historical periodicals held by the American Antiquarian Society (AAS). The collection exists as a series of five databases created from 6500 American periodicals published between 1691 and 1876. The collection also contains titles in more than two dozen languages including French, German, Norwegian, Spanish, and more. The series can be searched together or individually.


Primary Sources: British Periodicals


The Library now has access to three modules of the primary source collection, British Periodicals. This digitized and searchable resource is made up of collections previously available on microfilm — English Literary Periodicals and Early British Periodicals — and includes nearly 500 publications from the 17th century through to the early 21st century.

English Literary Periodicals (also known ELP) includes over 341 periodicals, published in Great Britain during the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, that are predominantly literary in nature. Besides literary reviews there are also theatrical, satirical, political, religious, and women’s magazines, such as Monthly Review and Critical Review.

Early British Periodicals is a supplement to ELP, consisting of additional 168 titles (1681-1921), and includes titles such as Quarterly Review and Edinburgh Review.

Search results can be filtered to article type and downloaded in either PDF or JPEG format.


Primary Sources: Independent Voices

cover of Berkeley Barb issue

Independent Voices is a digital collection of magazines, journals, newspapers, and newsletters housed in the alternative and small press archives of participating libraries and historical institutions.

The focus is on materials published during the 1960s-1980s that stem primarily from the second wave of feminism, LGBT activism, GI and student protest movements, and the Black, Chicano(a), and Native American movements.


Primary Sources: Scientific American Archive (1845-2005) and Scientific American Supplement & Builders Archive Collection

UC Berkeley now has access to both the Scientific American Archive (1845-2005) and Scientific American Supplement & Builders Archive Collection, which were licensed by the California Digital Library. CDL shared this information about the resource:

“Scientific American is the “oldest continually published magazine in the U.S.” Thus, its archive is an amazing resource, providing a wealth of historic information in all areas of science and technology. The coverage, going back to the first four-page issue published in 1845, and the quality of the documents–both text and images–is excellent. The archive is divided into four segments, 2005-1993, 1992-1948, 1947-1910, and 1909-1845, and includes some 133,000 articles. Good-quality PDFs are available for the entire archive; users can even browse an entire issue as a PDF file. There are options for both basic and advanced searching via Nature.com’s interface. Since the coverage goes back more than 160 years, the archive contains interesting articles by or about many noted scientists. For example, a 1955 issue of Scientific American features an interview with Albert Einstein, and there are articles by and about Linus Pauling, Francis Crick, and James Watson, to name a few.


“Additionally, the Supplement & Builders Archive Collection has also been licensed. The recently digitized Scientific American Supplement & Builders Archive Collection provides access to more than 2,500 issues from the Supplement and Builders publications. Together, these five collections provide unique insight into historic breakthroughs in science, technology, medicine and architecture.”


Browse journals on your tablet or iPhone

browzine

Image Source

 

Browse, read, and monitor thousands of scholarly journals on your tablet or iPhone/iPod Touch with the BrowZine app.

Create a personal bookshelf of favorite journals, be alerted when new issues are published, and save articles to Zotero, Mendeley, Dropbox, and more.

Get started on your tablet (iPad, Android, Kindle Fire HD) or iPhone/iPod Touch in three easy steps:

  1. Go to your app store, search for BrowZine and download for free.
  2. Open the app, and select our library, University of California, Berkeley, from the listing.
  3. Afterwards, use AirBears or set up the campus VPN to begin reading scholarly journals from the Library.

Learn more about BrowZine from our guide and check out the Introduction to BrowZine video from Third Iron.

Happy browsing!

by Jeffery Loo, Cheminformatics Librarian

Contact me at jloo [at] library.berkeley.edu