DH+Lib: Building and Preserving Collections for Digital Humanities Research

An English stage showing Sir John Falstaff and Mrs. Quickly, ca. 1662
An English stage showing Sir John Falstaff and Mrs. Quickly, ca. 1662

DH+LIB: BUILDING AND PRESERVING COLLECTIONS FOR DIGITAL HUMANITIES RESEARCH

Wednesday, April 17th, 9:30 – 11:00 AM
Doe 180

This session will feature panelists building collections and tools for local digital humanities projects. Kathryn Stine, manager for digital content development and strategy at the California Digital Library, will talk about building web archive collections through collaboration, preparing these collections for discovery and use, and tapping the research potential of the resulting captured content and data. Mary Elings, Head of Technical Services for The Bancroft Library, will talk about the role libraries can play in developing research-ready digital collections to facilitate emerging research methods. And Gisèle Tanasse, Film & Media Services Librarian at the Library, will discuss her role in Shakespeare’s Staging, a DH project to help digitize, preserve, and make accessible Shakespeare performances from UC Berkeley students.

DH Fair 2019
http://ucberk.li/dhfair

 

2019 DH Fair Library Committee
Stacy Reardon, Chair
Lynn Cunningham
Mary Elings
Jeremy Ott
Liladhar Pendse
Claude Potts


Ana Hatherly Bibliography + Conference/Symposium + Talk

Poeta chama poeta I, 1989
Ana Hatherly, Poeta chama poeta I, 1989, Col. Fundação de Serralves – Museu de Arte Contemporânea, Porto.

In anticipation of  the conference/symposium on Portuguese visual artist/poet/scholar/filmmaker Ana Hatherly (1929-2015), we’ve assembled a bibliography of works authored by and about her in the Berkeley Library. Hatherly was one of the pioneers of the experimental poetry and literature movement in Portugal and already well-known in Europe before earning her PhD at Berkeley in 1986. Many of the books in the collection came to the Library through her dissertation advisor Arthur Askins who maintained close contact with her after she returned to Portugal. Other books were acquired more recently through the support of the Portuguese Studies Program in the Institute of European Studies (IES) and from donors such as retired Berkeley librarian AnneMarie Mitchell.

Between the lines: Tradition and Plasticity in Ana Hathery | Entrelinhas: tradição e plasticidade em Ana Hatherly, which will take place this Friday, March 22 in Stephens Hall, is the third conference/symposium since IES and the Camões Institute in Lisbon inaugurated the Catédra Ana Hatherly, or Chair, in Portuguese Studies in 2017. Tomorrow morning, Patrícia Lino who is currently a Camões lecturer at UC Santa Barbara will give a talk in English on the poetry of Ana Hatherly in Barrows Hall that is free and open to the public.

Ana Hatherly

https://guides.lib.berkeley.edu/ana-hatherly


Spanish (Latin America)

The Languages of Berkeley: An Online Exhibition

 Fama, y obras póstumas (Madrid: Manuel Ruiz de Murga, 1700) from Universität Bielefeld

Nun, rebel, genius, poet, persecuted intellectual, and proto-feminist, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (Nepantla 1648-Mexico City 1695) was the most distinguished intellectual in the pre-Independence American colonies of Spain. She was called “Tenth Muse” in her own time and continues to inspire the popular and scholarly imagination. Generations of Mexican schoolchildren have memorized her satirical ballad “Hombres necios que acusáis / a la mujer sin razón… “ (You foolish men who cast all blame on women), and her portrait appears on the 200-peso note. Despite her status as an icon of Mexican culture, an annotated edition of her complete works was not published until the tercentenary of her birth in the mid-1950s, and the complexity of her poetry, prose, and theater was known only by reputation until the second wave of feminism brought scholarly attention to her work in the 1970s. Octavio Paz’s monumental study, Sor Juana, o, Las trampas de la fe (Sor Juana, or The Traps of Faith) appeared in 1982.

An intellectual prodigy brought to the viceregal court of New Spain in her teens, Sor Juana was largely self-taught. In 1669, she entered the convent of San Jerónimo in order to continue her studies. Although women were excluded from the study of theology and rhetoric, she wrote a brilliant critique of a renowned Portuguese cleric’s sermon, and was reprimanded by the Bishop of Puebla, who wrote under a female pseudonym. Sor Juana’s “Respuesta a sor Filotea” (1691, “Reply to Sister Philothea”) displayed her erudition in defense of her intellectual passion, arguing that St. Paul’s often-quoted admonition that women should keep silent in church (mulieres in ecclesia taceant), should not prohibit women’s pursuit of knowledge and instruction of young girls. Other significant works include secular and religious theater; philosophical poetry; passionate poems to the noblewomen who were her patrons; and villancicos, sets of songs she was commissioned to write for religious celebrations.

Sor Juana’s long epistemological poem, Primero sueño (First Dream) epitomizes the Creole appropriation of the Baroque and yet she weaves into her poetry and theater a recognition of the humanity of indigenous peoples. While her literary models were European and her poetry was first published in Spain, her works evince an American consciousness in the representation of the violence of the conquest in the loa to El divino Narciso (Divine Narcissus) and her use of Nahuatl in the villancicos.

Contribution by Emilie Bergmann
Professor,  Department of Spanish & Portuguese

Title: Fama, y obras póstumas
Title in English: Homage and posthumous works
Author: Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (1648-1695)
Imprint: Madrid: Manuel Ruiz de Murga, 1700.
Edition: 1st
Language: Spanish (Latin America)
Language Family: Indo-European, Romance
Source: Universitätsbibliothek, Universität Bielefeld
URL: http://ds.ub.uni-bielefeld.de/viewer/image/1592397/1

Other digital editions: Inundación castálida, de la única poetisa, musa décima, soror Juana Inés de la Cruz (Madrid: Juan García Infanzón, 1689) and the first edition of Segundo volumen de las obras de soror Juana Inés de la Cruz (Sevilla: Tomás López de Haro, 1692).

Print editions at Berkeley: Critical and annotated editions of the first two volumes of Sor Juana’s work, Inundación Castálida (1689) and Segundo tomo (1693), as well as Fama, y obras póstumas and editions of complete and selected works are available in printed form in The Bancroft Library and the Main Stacks.

Sor Juana’s complete works were published in four volumes: Obras completas, Alfonso Méndez Plancarte and Alberto G. Salcedo. Mexico City: Fondo de Cultura Económica, 1951-57. Many English translations of selected works of Sor Juana’s works are also in OskiCat including those of Alan S. Trueblood, Margaret Sayers Peden, Amanda Powell, and Edith Grossman.

The Languages of Berkeley [fan]
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The Languages of Berkeley is a dynamic online sequential exhibition celebrating the diversity of languages that have advanced research, teaching and learning at the University of California, Berkeley. It is made possible with support from the UC Berkeley Library and is co-sponsored by the Berkeley Language Center (BLC).

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Introducing

The Languages of Berkeley: An Online Exhibition

The Languages of Berkeley [fan]We are pleased to launch this online library exhibition that celebrates the magnificent diversity of languages that advance research, teaching, and learning at the University of California, Berkeley. It is the point of embarkation for an exciting sequential exhibit that will build on one post per week, showcasing an array of digitized works in the their original language chosen by those who work with these languages on a daily basis—librarians, professors, lecturers, staff, and students. Many of these early-published works are now in the public domain and are open to the world to read and share without restriction.

Since its founding in 1868, students and faculty at UC Berkeley have concerned themselves with a breathtaking range of languages. In support of teaching and research, the University Library, which collects and preserves materials in all languages, now boasts a collection of more than twelve million volumes. It is among the largest academic libraries in the U.S. with more than half of its resources in more than 400 distinct languages.

The Languages of Berkeley as defined by this exhibition are the 59 modern and ancient languages that are currently taught across 14 departments on campus plus a few more languages that contributors wished to include. Linking the languages and works, the online exhibit will reach completion in Fall 2020 and then be archived with other online library exhibits. From November 2019 to November 2020, a physical companion exhibition will be installed in Moffitt Library’s Free Speech Movement Café, providing a prominent physical interstice with the online instance. It is our hope that it nourishes and inspires intellectual curiosity and creativity and an appreciation for learning a foreign language.

This exhibition is made possible with the contributions of all listed below and through the support of the UC Berkeley Library. It is co-sponsored by the Berkeley Language Center (BLC). We hope you enjoy!

Claude Potts
Librarian for Romance Language Collections

Aisha Hamilton
Exhibitions Designer

The Languages of Berkeley [fan]
Continue to the exhibition

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Contributors

Stephan Astourian, Associate Adjunct Professor, Department of History, Emilie Bergmann, Professor, Department of Spanish & Portuguese, Jaeyong Chang, Librarian for the Korean Collections, C.V. Starr East Asian Library, Adam Clemons, African & African American Studies Librarian, Yusmarni Djalius, PhD Student, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies, Myrna Douzjian, Lecturer, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Natalia Estrada, Reference & Collections Assistant, Ruth Haber, Judaica Specialist, Mohamed Hamed, Middle Eastern & Near Eastern Studies Librarian, Jianye He, Librarian for Chinese Collections, C.V. Starr East Asian Library, Arthit Jiamrattanyoo, PhD Student, Department of History, University of Washington,  Rick Kern, Director, Berkeley Language Center, Jesse Loesberg, Web Designer, Library Communications, Adnan Malik, Curator and Cataloger for the South Asia Collection, South/Southeast Asia Library, Toshie Marra, Librarian for the Japanese Collection, C.V. Starr East Asian Library, Susan Maslan, Associate Professor, Department of French,  Nasser Meerkhan, Assistant Professor, Department of Spanish & Portuguese, Steve Mendoza, Selector for Dutch, Curatorial Assistant & Reference Specialist, Jennifer Nelson, Reference Librarian, The Robbins Collection, UC Berkeley School of Law, Jeremy Ott, Classics & Germanic Studies Librarian, Gabrielle Pascua, Undergraduate, Department of History, Liladhar Pendse, Librarian for East European and Eurasian Studies & Librarian for Latin American Studies, Stacy Reardon, Literatures and Digital Humanities Librarian, Ana-Belén Redondo-Campillos, Lecturer, Department of Spanish & Portuguese, Brenda Rosado, PhD Student, Department of Italian Studies, Deborah Rudolph, Curator, C.V. Starr East Asian Library, Virginia Shih, Curator for the Southeast Asia Collection, South/Southeast Asia Library, Shahrzad Shirvani, PhD Student, Architecture, College of Environmental Design, Troy Smith, PhD Student, Department of Scandinavian, Hanh Tran, Lecturer, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies, Susan Xue, Head, Information and Public Services & Electronic Resources Librarian, C.V. Starr East Asian Library, Lisa Weber, Project Manager, Library IT, Kenneth Wong, Lecturer,  Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies, Jonathan Zwicker, Associate Professor, Department of East Asian Languages & Cultures.


The sweetest journal in the Library

A back issue of an award-winning bilingual cultural journal from Portugal was brought to our attention earlier this week. Usually librarians only become involved with journal receipts when they haven’t been arriving regularly, prices have increased or formats have changed but this special issue of Egoísta was like no other I had seen before. It came with a small bag of hard red candies and the cover was designed to hold them them in place. Clearly there was a connection between the issue’s theme on doce (sweet) but can you imagine the environmental risks that might ensue if we left the candies attached to the journal and housed them with the rest of the print resources in the Main Stacks? Happy Valentine’s Day!

Claude Potts
Librarian for Romance Language Collections


More Gems from the Rolling Wall

If you haven’t yet read last week’s post by Scholarly Communication Officer Rachael Samberg on Public Domain Day 2019 or the featured story about the 50 works digitized by the UC Berkeley Library in anticipation of this big event, you might enjoy taking a look at those. This blog post calls attention to the thousands of other books, journals and other materials in the romance languages that are no longer protected under U.S. copyright since January 1, 2019 and now available to all through the HathiTrust Digital Library. This collaborative digital repository has assembled an impressive collection of more than 53,000 digitized items published in 1923 that can easily be searched and that includes the literary works highlighted below, many from Berkeley’s print collection:

La ronde de nuit by Sem (Paris: A. Fayard & cie, 1923)

Notes from the Backlog: Education of the Sun King

By Randal Brandt

This is the first entry in an occasional series (perhaps very occasional) of articles describing Bancroft Library materials that have recently been made available for research.

Cartes des rois de France
Cartes des rois de France, t DC36.6 .D47 1645  

Playing cards can be used for many purposes other than recreation. Three decks of playing cards designed for a very specific purpose–to further the education of a young monarch–have been cataloged at The Bancroft Library.

France’s Louis XIV (1638-1718), known as the Sun King, ruled for 72 years, longer than any other European sovereign. Born on September 5, 1638, to King Louis XIII of France (1601-1643) and Anne of Austria (1601-1666), the future Louis XIV was his parents’ first child. When his father died on May 14, 1643, young Louis ascended to the throne at the tender age of four under the regency of his mother, who was assisted by her chief minister, the Italian-born Cardinal Jules Mazarin (1602-1661).  

One of Cardinal Mazarin’s duties was to supervise the education of the young king. To that end, he commissioned Jean Desmarets de Saint-Sorlin (1595-1676), a member of the Académie Française, to devise a series of card games, which were in vogue at court, to interest Louis in his studies. The series comprises four sets of educational cards, each bearing a full-length figure, designed and engraved by the noted Florentine engraver Stefano della Bella (1610-1664), with descriptive text and a number. In 1644, Desmarets de Saint-Sorlin published an explanation of them with the title Les jeux de cartes, des roys de France, des reines renommées, de la géographie, et des fables, cy devant dediez à la reine régente, pour l’instruction du roi (“The Card Decks [or Sets] of the Kings of France, Renowned Queens, Geography, and Fables, Previously Dedicated to the Queen Regent, for the Instruction of the King.”)

Bancroft holds three of the four sets of cards. The Cartes des rois de France (“Cards of the Kings of France”) set contains 39 biographical cards, beginning with Pharamond and ending with young Louis himself, who is depicted as a boy riding in a triumphal chariot with his mother, Anne, holding the reins. The descriptive texts recount the territorial gains and losses, marriage alliances, royal character, and political and military adventures of the kings of France. Jeu des reynes renommées (“Deck [or Set] of Renowned Queens”) has 52 biographical cards ranging from Martesie, Queen of the Amazons, to Anne of Austria. The set comprises four series of 13 cards each, with descriptive legends and a single descriptive adjective (pious, clever, cruel, saintly, wise, brave, etc.) at one of the upper corners. Jeu de la géographie (“Deck [or Set] of Geography”) also has 52 cards, with figures emblematic of the country and text recording the nation’s size, borders, natural resources, principal cities, etc. Thirteen of the cards relate to America.

The cards are known to exist in four states, with later versions having numbers and suits added, and some of the images modified or replaced (for example, the image of the young Louis XIV was later substituted with a depiction of a statue of the king as a grown man). Bancroft’s sets, which were purchased in 2013, are all in the second state. Each card has been cut out and mounted on a separate leaf. The three sets are bound together as a single volume in a contemporary vellum binding. These cards, which were later reprinted twice, first in 1664 and again in 1698, are well-known in the literature documenting the history of playing cards. However, very few examples survive in libraries. With three complete sets, Bancroft’s volume represents one of the most comprehensive collections available for research.

Cartes des rois de France (“Cards of the Kings of France”)

Jeu des reynes renommées (“Deck [or Set] of Renowned Queens”)

Jeu de la géographie (“Deck [or Set] of Geography”)


Lampooning Presidents through Words, Images and Scholarship

Zef, Kak, and Degreff. Macron, L'an I: pardon de vous le dire. Paris: Florent Massot, 2018.

As two of the oldest modern democracies, France and the United States share a long tradition of freedom of speech and of the press (and at times governmental censorship). The two societies have found catharsis in the mockery of their highest elected officials through caricatures, cartoons, and critical writings. Here are a few recent library acquisitions, in English and in French, from both sides of the Atlantic in this category of political critique:

Baldwin, Alec and Kurt Andersen. You Can’t Spell America Without Me: The Really Tremendous Inside Story of My Fantastic First Year As President Donald J. Trump (a So-Called Parody). New York: Penguin Press, 2017.

Bourhis, Hervé and Rudy Spiessert. Trump de A à Z. Bruxelles: Casterman, 2017.

Burrell, Ginger R. Un[Hood]ed. Morgan Hill, CA: Midnight Moon Press, 2017.

Cole, David, and Melanie W. Stinnett. Rules for Resistance: Advice from Around the Globe for the Age of Trump. New York: The New Press, 2017.

Connolly, William E. Aspirational Fascism: The Struggle for Multifaceted Democracy Under Trumpism. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2017.

Daniel, Jean-Marc. Macron: La valse folle de Jupiter. Paris: l’Archipel, 2018.

Être postmoderne / Michel Maffesoli; postface de Hélène Strohl: Emmanuel Macron, icône ou fake de la postmodernité? Paris: Les Éditions du Cerf, 2018.

Filoche, Gérard. Macron, ou, la casse sociale. Paris: l’Archipel, 2018.

Merchet, Jean-Dominique. Macron Bonaparte: Essai. Paris: Stock, 2017.Fottorino, Éric and Joep Bertrams. Détrumpez-vous!, Paris: Gallimard, 2017.

Fourquet, Jérôme. Le nouveau clivage: mondialisation, libre-échange, métropolisation, flux migratoires : état des démocraties occidentales. Paris: Les éditions du Cerf, 2018.

Giroux, Henry A. The Public in Peril: Trump and the Menace of American Authoritarianism. New York, NY: Routledge, 2018.

Johnston, David C. It’s Even Worse Than You Think: What the Trump Administration Is Doing to America. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2018.

Lee, Bandy X. The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump: 27 Psychiatrists and Mental Health Experts Assess a President. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2017.

Merchet, Jean-Dominique. Macron Bonaparte: Essai. Paris: Stock, 2017.

Nanos, Nik. The Age of Voter Rage. London: Eyewear Publishing, 2018.

Taguieff, Pierre-André. Macron: miracle ou mirage? Paris: Éditions de l’Observatoire, 2017.

Toulouse, Anne. Dans la tête de Donald Trump. Paris: Stock, 2016.

Trumpism: The Politics Of Gender in a Post-Propitious America / edited by Laura Finley and Matthew Johnson. Newcastle upon Tyne, UK; Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2018.

Willem. Macron: L’amour fou. Bordeaux: Les Requins marteaux, 2018.

Zef, Kak and Degreff. Macron, L’an I: pardon de vous le dire. Paris: Florent Massot, 2018.

Zef, Kak, and Degreff. Macron, L'an I: pardon de vous le dire. Paris: Florent Massot, 2018.
Zef, Kak, and Degreff. Macron, L’an I: pardon de vous le dire. Paris: Florent Massot, 2018.

Thérèse Bonney: Art Collector, Photojournalist, Francophile, Cheese Lover

Thérèse Bonney aboard the S.S. Siboney, en route to Portugal, 1941.

Thérèse Bonney aboard the S.S. Siboney, en route to Portugal, 1941. BANC PIC 1982.111 series 3, NNEG box 49, item 19

Pioneering war correspondent and Cal grad Mabel Thérèse Bonney (1894-1978) was decorated with the Croix de Guerre and the Legion d’Honneur by the French government, and the Order of the White Rose of Finland for her work during World War II. Her photographs were exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, the Library of Congress, and Carnegie Hall during her lifetime. Her work on children displaced by war spurred the United Nations to create their international children’s emergency fund, UNICEF, in 1946, and inspired the Academy Award-winning film The Search in 1948. Yet in the canon of female war photographers that includes contemporaries such as Lee Miller, Margaret Bourke-White, and Toni Frissell, Bonney rarely receives mention. Bonney was a renaissance woman whose life deserves further study, and her collections at the Bancroft Library are ripe for discovery. Manuscript Archivist Marjorie Bryer has processed The Thérèse Bonney papers, and Pictorial Archivist Sara Ferguson has digitized over 2,500 previously inaccessible nitrate negatives from the Thérèse Bonney Photograph Collection.

ART CONNOISSEUR

While living in Paris in the 1920s and 1930s, Bonney modeled for fashion designers like Sonia Delaunay and Madeleine Vionnet, and became friends with many of the most famous artists and writers of her day, including Raoul Dufy, Gertrude Stein, and George Bernard Shaw. In 1924 Bonney founded an international photo service that licensed images acquired in France for publication in the U.S. She was often dissatisfied with the images she distributed, and this inspired her to take up photography herself. Bonney wrote about, and took photographs of, many of the artists and writers in her life throughout the twenties, thirties, and forties.

PHOTOJOURNALISM AND WAR RELIEF EFFORTS

Bonney photographed throughout Europe during World War II, focusing on the effects of war on the civilian population. Her photographs of children were particularly moving and resulted in her most famous work, the exhibit and book, Europe’s ChildrenBonney was actively involved with relief efforts after the war, particularly in the Alsace region of France. She also founded a number of organizations dedicated to promoting friendship between citizens of France and the United States, and improving Franco-American political relations. One effort, the Chain d’Amite, encouraged French families to open their homes to American G.I.s; another, Project Patriotism, inspired airmen who were shot down in France to help the families that had rescued them. Project Patriotism eventually spread to other European countries, including the Netherlands. Marjorie’s father-in-law, Peter, was a teenager when Germany invaded the Netherlands during the war. He was sent to live with relatives in the Dutch countryside so he wouldn’t be conscripted. One of Peter’s most moving stories was about the American pilot his family hid when his plane crashed on the family farm. Bonney’s papers include many poignant letters from U.S. soldiers and, while processing the collection, Marjorie wondered what this airman from Brooklyn might have written about his experiences with his Dutch “family.”

LOVER OF CHEESE

Bonney’s many interests included food and cooking. She and her sister, Louise, wrote a guide to Paris restaurants and a cookbook, French cooking for American kitchens. Her papers include her research on cheese, which she referred to as “Project Fromage.” Series 7 of Bonney’s papers include meticulous notes on various cheeses from France and the Netherlands, “technical” correspondence about cheese, and materials related to tyrosemiophilia — the hobby of collecting cheese labels.

EVERYDAY PEOPLE AND LIFE DURING WARTIME 

Bonney documented daily life during wartime across Europe. She recorded entire communities — their families, customs, and industries, their artists and politicians, their schools, and their churches. Her papers and photographs show not only the horrors of war but the hope and perseverance of those who lived through it.

NOW AVAILABLE AT THE BANCROFT LIBRARY! 

Newly digitized portions of the pictorial collection include Series 6: France, Germany 1944-1946. This series includes photographs of concentration camps Vaihingen, Buchenwald, and Dachau; Displaced Person camps; Neuschwanstein Castle; and Hermann Göring’s Collection of art looted by the Nazi’s. It also includes many images of the heavily bombarded town of Ammerschwihr in Alsace, France and war relief efforts there. Future digitization efforts will focus on Series 3, Carnegie Corporation Trip: Portugal, Spain, France 1941-1942.  This series consists of images taken while on a grant from the Carnegie Corporation of New York to document the effects of war on civilian populations. It includes images of military personnel, civilian industries, and Red Cross operations. Famous personalities pictured in this series include Pierre Bonnard, Henri Matisse, Georges Roualt, Gertrude Stein, Philippe Petain, Raoul Dufy, and Aristide Maillol.

Bonney’s papers help contextualize her photographs. They include correspondence; personal materials; her writings (autobiographical and articles about others); and her files on World War II, Franco-American relations, art, fashion, photography, and cheese.

Both collections are open for research:

Finding Aid to the Thérèse Bonney Photograph Collection, circa 1850-circa 1955 (bulk 1930-1945)

Finding Aid to the Thérèse Bonney Papers 

— Marjorie Bryer and Sara Ferguson


New Instagram feed for Romance Language Collections


 UC Berkeley Romance Language Collections

The new Romance Language Collections Instagram feed brings forth little known and new resources and services in the UC Berkeley Library. Once you start following you’ll instantly receive early notices of new books, e-resources, exhibits, readings and more through your smartphone.