2019 IgNobel Prize Winners Announced A While Ago

Hello,

Once again, we have the IgNobel prizes. Here’s a list of the 2019 winners; links to the actual, real research papers are here.

MEDICINE PRIZE [ITALY, THE NETHERLANDS]
Silvano Gallus, for collecting evidence that pizza might protect against illness and death, if the pizza is made and eaten in Italy.

MEDICAL EDUCATION PRIZE [USA]
Karen Pryor and Theresa McKeon, for using a simple animal-training technique— called “clicker training” —to train surgeons to perform orthopedic surgery.

BIOLOGY PRIZE [SINGAPORE, CHINA, GERMANY, AUSTRALIA, POLAND, USA, BULGARIA]
Ling-Jun Kong, Herbert Crepaz, Agnieszka Górecka, Aleksandra Urbanek, Rainer Dumke, and Tomasz Paterek, for discovering that dead magnetized cockroaches behave differently than living magnetized cockroaches.

ANATOMY PRIZE [FRANCE]
Roger Mieusset and Bourras Bengoudifa, for measuring scrotal temperature asymmetry in naked and clothed postmen in France.

CHEMISTRY PRIZE [JAPAN]
Shigeru Watanabe, Mineko Ohnishi, Kaori Imai, Eiji Kawano, and Seiji Igarashi, for estimating the total saliva volume produced per day by a typical five-year-old child

ENGINEERING PRIZE [IRAN]
Iman Farahbakhsh, for inventing a diaper-changing machine for use on human infants.

ECONOMICS PRIZE [TURKEY, THE NETHERLANDS, GERMANY]
Habip Gedik, Timothy A. Voss, and Andreas Voss, for testing which country’s paper money is best at transmitting dangerous bacteria.

PEACE PRIZE [UK, SAUDI ARABIA, SINGAPORE, USA]
Ghada A. bin Saif, Alexandru Papoiu, Liliana Banari, Francis McGlone, Shawn G. Kwatra, Yiong-Huak Chan, and Gil Yosipovitch, for trying to measure the pleasurability of scratching an itch.

PSYCHOLOGY PRIZE [GERMANY]
Fritz Strack, for discovering that holding a pen in one’s mouth makes one smile, which makes one happier — and for then discovering that it does not.

PHYSICS PRIZE [USA, TAIWAN, AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, SWEDEN, UK]
Patricia Yang, Alexander Lee, Miles Chan, Alynn Martin, Ashley Edwards, Scott Carver, and David Hu, for studying how, and why, wombats make cube-shaped poo.

 


Newly Acquired Public Health Books

Here is a sample of new Public Health books — many more may be found on our New Public Health Books web guide. Click the links below for library location. And, happy reading!

Community-based participatory research for health: advancing social and health equity
Transgender and gender nonconforming health and aging
Mapping AIDS : visual histories of an enduring epidemic

Mama might be better off dead: the failure of health care in urban America
Climate change and the people’s health
Global Indigenous Health: Reconciling the Past, Engaging the Present, Animating the Future

Mobile communications and public health
Pregnancy and power: a history of reproductive politics in the United States
The gendered landscape of suicide: masculinities, emotions, and cultures


New Public Health Books

Here is a sample of new Public Health books — many more may be found on our New Public Health Books web guide. Click the links for location: most are at the Bioscience, Natural Resources & Public Health Library; some are at other UCB libraries, or online.

LGBT Health: Meeting the Needs of Gender and Sexual Minorities
How Qualitative Data Analysis Happens: Moving Beyond “Themes Emerged”
Reproductive Geographies: bodies, places and politics

Evaluation for a Caring Society
Teaching Health Humanities
Emerging Micro-Pollutants in the Environment: occurrence, fate, and distribution

The Global Gag Rule and Women’s Reproductive Health: Rhetoric versus reality
Health Services Evaluation
Understanding Trans Health: Discourse, power and possibility


Reading – for fun! – at the Bioscience, Natural Resources & Public Health Library

Periodicals on Display at the Bioscience LibraryIn addition to the hundreds of academic journals that we subscribe to electronically, the Bioscience, Natural Resources & Public Health Library gets some interesting publications in print. In our recently refreshed New Books and Journals reading area you can flip through key journals like Science and Nature and also peruse magazines like Bay Nature, Successful Farming, National Parks, Earth First!,  Outdoor California, Nutrition Today, Reptiles, Natural History, Diabetes, and many others. Settle into one of our comfy chairs and browse away!

If you’d rather be behind a book, our book jacket display near the circulation desk features some of our new print books, many of which are popular titles on science, health, and environmental topics. 


2018 Winners of the Ig® Nobel Prize Announced!!

…For achievements that first make people LAUGH then make them THINK

MEDICINE PRIZE [USA] — Marc Mitchell and David Wartinger, for using roller coaster rides to try to hasten the passage of kidney stones.
REFERENCE: “Validation of a Functional Pyelocalyceal Renal Model for the Evaluation of Renal Calculi Passage While Riding a Roller Coaster,” Marc A. Mitchell, David D. Wartinger, The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, vol. 116, October 2016, pp. 647-652.

ANTHROPOLOGY PRIZE [SWEDEN, ROMANIA, DENMARK, THE NETHERLANDS, GERMANY, UK, INDONESIA, ITALY] — Tomas Persson, Gabriela-Alina Sauciuc, and Elainie Madsen, for collecting evidence, in a zoo, that chimpanzees imitate humans about as often, and about as well, as humans imitate chimpanzees.
REFERENCE: “Spontaneous Cross-Species Imitation in Interaction Between Chimpanzees and Zoo Visitors,” Tomas Persson, Gabriela-Alina Sauciuc, and Elainie Madsen, Primates, vol. 59, no. 1, January 2018, pp 19–29.

BIOLOGY PRIZE [SWEDEN, COLOMBIA, GERMANY, FRANCE, SWITZERLAND] — Paul Becher, Sebastien Lebreton, Erika Wallin, Erik Hedenstrom, Felipe Borrero-Echeverry, Marie Bengtsson, Volker Jorger, and Peter Witzgall, for demonstrating that wine experts can reliably identify, by smell, the presence of a single fly in a glass of wine.
REFERENCE: “The Scent of the Fly,” Paul G. Becher, Sebastien Lebreton, Erika A. Wallin, Erik Hedenstrom, Felipe Borrero-Echeverry, Marie Bengtsson, Volker Jorger, and Peter Witzgall, bioRxiv, no. 20637, 2017.

CHEMISTRY PRIZE [PORTUGAL] — Paula Romão, Adília Alarcão and the late César Viana, for measuring the degree to which human saliva is a good cleaning agent for dirty surfaces.
REFERENCE: “Human Saliva as a Cleaning Agent for Dirty Surfaces,” by Paula M. S. Romão, Adília M. Alarcão and César A.N. Viana, Studies in Conservation, vol. 35, 1990, pp. 153-155.

MEDICAL EDUCATION PRIZE [JAPAN] — Akira Horiuchi, for the medical report “Colonoscopy in the Sitting Position: Lessons Learned From Self-Colonoscopy.”
REFERENCE: “Colonoscopy in the Sitting Position: Lessons Learned From Self-Colonoscopy by Using a Small-Caliber, Variable-Stiffness Colonoscope,” Akira Horiuchi and Yoshiko Nakayama, Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, vol. 63, No. 1, 2006, pp. 119-20.

LITERATURE PRIZE [AUSTRALIA, EL SALVADOR, UK] — Thea Blackler, Rafael Gomez, Vesna Popovic and M. Helen Thompson, for documenting that most people who use complicated products do not read the instruction manual.
REFERENCE: “Life Is Too Short to RTFM: How Users Relate to Documentation and Excess Features in Consumer Products,” Alethea L. Blackler, Rafael Gomez, Vesna Popovic and M. Helen Thompson, Interacting With Computers, vol. 28, no. 1, 2014, pp. 27-46.

NUTRITION PRIZE [ZIMBABWE, TANZANIA, UK] — James Cole, for calculating that the caloric intake from a human-cannibalism diet is significantly lower than the caloric intake from most other traditional meat diets.
REFERENCE: “Assessing the Calorific Significance of Episodes of Human Cannibalism in the Paleolithic,” James Cole, Scientific Reports, vol. 7, no. 44707, April 7, 2017.

PEACE PRIZE [SPAIN, COLOMBIA] — Francisco Alonso, Cristina Esteban, Andrea Serge, Maria-Luisa Ballestar, Jaime Sanmartín, Constanza Calatayud, and Beatriz Alamar, for measuring the frequency, motivation, and effects of shouting and cursing while driving an automobile.
REFERENCE: “Shouting and Cursing While Driving: Frequency, Reasons, Perceived Risk and Punishment,” Francisco Alonso, Cristina Esteban, Andrea Serge and Maria-Luisa Ballestar, Journal of Sociology and Anthropology, vol. 1, no. 12017, pp. 1-7.
REFERENCE: “La Justicia en el Tráfico: Conocimiento y Valoración de la Población Española” [“Justice in Traffic: Knowledge and Valuation of the Spanish Population”)], F. Alonso, J. Sanmartín, C. Calatayud, C. Esteban, B. Alamar, and M. L. Ballestar, Cuadernos de Reflexión Attitudes, 2005.

REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE PRIZE [USA, JAPAN, SAUDI ARABIA, EGYPT, INDIA, BANGLADESH] — John Barry, Bruce Blank, and Michel Boileau, for using postage stamps to test whether the male sexual organ is functioning properly—as described in their study “Nocturnal Penile Tumescence Monitoring With Stamps.”
REFERENCE: “Nocturnal Penile Tumescence Monitoring With Stamps,” John M. Barry, Bruce Blank, Michael Boileau, Urology, vol. 15, 1980, pp. 171-172.

ECONOMICS PRIZE [CANADA, CHINA, SINGAPORE, USA] — Lindie Hanyu Liang, Douglas Brown, Huiwen Lian, Samuel Hanig, D. Lance Ferris, and Lisa Keeping, for investigating whether it is effective for employees to use Voodoo dolls to retaliate against abusive bosses.
REFERENCE: “Righting a Wrong: Retaliation on a Voodoo Doll Symbolizing an Abusive Supervisor Restores Justice,” Lindie Hanyu Liang, Douglas J. Brown, Huiwen Lian, Samuel Hanig, D. Lance Ferris, and Lisa M. Keeping, The Leadership Quarterly, February 2018.

As always, winners from previous years, as well as all kinds of stuff, may be found on the Improbable Research website.


Public Health Library merges with Bioscience & Natural Resources Library

Bioscience Library
The collections of the Public Health Library will be moved to the Biosciences, Natural Resources & Public Health Library in the Valley Life Sciences Building, shown above. (Photo by J. Pierre Carrillo for the UC Berkeley Library)

On June 4, two important libraries in the Life & Health Sciences Division will come together under one roof as the Marian Koshland Bioscience, Natural Resources & Public Health Library. The Sheldon Margen Public Health Library — located in 1 University Hall, at Oxford Street and University Avenue — will close June 1.

For more details, read the story at Library News.

 


Cal Day 2018 at the Bioscience Library: Bears, bugs, dinosaurs, and more!

Come by the Bioscience and Natural Resources Library on Cal Day, Saturday, April 21, 10am – 3pm. Marvel at the dinosaurs in the Valley Life Sciences Building and peruse the library’s collection of dinosaur books for all ages. View research posters by Integrative Biology honors undergraduate students. Watch the documentary about renowned scientist Marian Diamond, My Love Affair with the Brain. See reproductions of engravings from the Banks’ Florilegium, a collection that documents plants collected by Sir Joseph Banks and Dr. Daniel Solander during Captain James Cook’s first voyage to the south Pacific Ocean. Other unusual and rare items from the Life and Health Science libraries will also be on display. 

Date: April 21, 2018
Time: 10 am – 3 pm
Location: Look for the table display near the Bioscience Library (2101 VLSB)

A cast of the smallest Triceratops skull ever found


Announcing the reconfiguration of two important libraries

The Valley Life Sciences Building is part of the classical core of the campus. (Photo by Cade Johnson for the University Library)
The Valley Life Sciences Building is part of the classical core of the campus. (Photo by Cade Johnson for the University Library)

After consultation with students, faculty, and staff from across campus, the University Library confirms the decision to merge the Sheldon Margen Public Health Library and the Marian Koshland Bioscience & Natural Resources Library at UC Berkeley. The reconfiguration of these two important libraries in the Life & Health Sciences Division of the University Library will better address current campus and research needs.

The Library staff and the collection from the Public Health Library will be relocated to the Valley Life Sciences Building and integrated with the vision and operations of the campus library there. The Library will continue to memorialize Sheldon Margen’s contributions to the school, the university, and the field.

To reach this decision, the Library received feedback from individuals from a number of departments and key campus stakeholders after a call for comment was issued in September.

Read the complete announcement for details on services and the timeline ahead.