CDPH In The News June, 2018: Final Issue

CDPH in the News

Navy Finds More Radiation Data Falsification at Hunters Point

from NBC Bay Area

Internal emails from the California Department of Public Health uncovered by the NBC Bay Area Investigative Unit through a public records request in 2015 show regulators, including the Navy, had concerns that radiological scans on 22 buildings at Hunters Point “were collected too fast.” As a result, the California Department of Public Health suspended the release recommendations for those 22 buildings. A release recommendation indicates any radiation that may have existed on a site has been cleaned up, doesn’t pose a health threat and can be turned over for redevelopment.

Deaths from fentanyl surge to record in California

from San Francisco Chronicle

According to the California Department of Public Health, 373 people died from fentanyl overdoses last year. That is more than the number who died from fentanyl overdoses in 2016, and more than four times the 81 who died from overdosing on the drug in 2013. It is the highest number of fentanyl-related deaths the state has seen since public health officials began tracking the numbers in 2008.

State Agency Criticized for Failing to Protect Highest At-Risk Communities

from Beyond Pesticides

California’s Department of Pesticide Regulation (DPR) is falling short of protecting vulnerable communities in the state, especially low-income and communities of color. This, according to a new report by California Environmental Justice Alliance (CEJA), which assesses state agencies on eight environmental justice principles. The poor showing by DPR comes at the forefront of reports that the state’s pesticide use has increased, nearing record highs.
CEJA’s assessment is the only one in the nation to evaluate state agencies based on the impact of their environmental policies on low-income communities and communities of color. This is critical as the California Department of Public Health finds that Latino schoolchildren are almost twice as likely as their white peers to attend schools in the top quartile for nearby pesticide use, but DPR’s regulations do not address the racial disparity in exposure.

State declares ‘immediate jeopardy’ at UC San Diego hospital over dirty surgical instruments

from Becker’s

California health officials declared “immediate jeopardy” at UC San Diego Health-Hillcrest in March for at least the eighth time after officials discovered issues with how surgical equipment was cleaned. The deficiencies were discovered during the California Department of Public Health’s routine compliance check at the hospital in March. Officials placed the hospital in “immediate jeopardy,” which indicates a hospital’s errors have caused or are likely to cause serious injury or death to patients. The designation was lifted 24 hours after it was initiated.

California Moving to Boost Lead Poisoning Prevention Programs for At-Risk Kids

from EWG News

An estimated half to three-fourths of lower-income young children in California don’t get the lead poisoning tests required by state and federal law. In response, state lawmakers are taking steps to strengthen the state’s childhood lead poisoning prevention efforts.
In January, an EWG analysis of state data found that between 2012 and 2016, almost three-fourths of California toddlers enrolled in Medi-Cal were not tested for lead in their blood. Our estimate was later reinforced by the state Department of Health Care Services, or DHCS, which reported that on average, each year 28 percent of the state’s toddlers are tested. Now, DHCS and the California Department of Public Health, or DPH, have released an analysis combining and matching the two agencies’ test data. The combined analysis found that in 2015, about 49 percent of 1- to 2-year-olds on Medi-Cal were tested, and about 41 percent of 2- to 3-year-olds were tested.


Public Health Library Updates

Hopefully, all of you saw Michael Marks’ May 30th email. It has a number of important dates in it. Please return all books by Monday, June 11th. In preparation for the cessation of the Public Health Library contract, Document Delivery requests will not be accepted after Wednesday, June 27th. Web portal access will shut down Friday, July 6th so be sure to retrieve all your PDF articles by then. A number of print journals that CDPH will not have electronic access to have been moved to the CDPH Richmond Building C Library. All topical training webpages (e.g., Literature Searching, Health Statistics/Data Resources, etc.) will be given to OQPA for CDPH access after July 1st. Don’t forget to register as a CDPH Library Services User with OQPA.

The Public Health Library is now closed to the public in preparation for our merger with the Bioscience and Natural Resources library over the summer; however, contract services continue until June 30th. If you need to visit us or have any questions, please call us at 510-642-2510 or email me.

To express our appreciation and bid farewell, we are having a Contract Farewell Event on June 20, 2018 from 4-6:30 pm. We would love to you to attend if you are available. Retirees are invited as well. Please RSVP at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/62018Farewell

If you have any questions, please let me know.

Debbie Jan

Debbie.Jan@cdph.ca.gov


Richmond Instruction: Public Health Digital Library Basics Hands-On

Wednesday, June 6, 2018, 10-11:30am
RCCC, P-1115
Building P, Richmond

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RSVP by Tuesday, June 5th to Michael Sholinbeck at
msholinb@library.berkeley.edu or (510) 642-2510.
Please obtain your supervisor’s approval before you RSVP.

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PLEASE NOTE: This class is limited to 42 participants.

NON-BUILDING P OCCUPANTS: Please make sure to register so your name will be on the class participant list given to the Building P Security Desk for entry into Building P.

Class Objective: Introduce the Public Health Digital Library resources to CDPH staff and show how to retrieve journals articles via your desktop.

Supervisors: Please encourage your staff to attend if appropriate.

The Public Health Library contract with CDPH ends June 30, 2018. At that time, CDPH will fully move over to the Public Health Digital Library (PHDL) provided by the National Public Health Coordination Office at the University of Massachusetts Medical School Lamar Soutter Library. This class will help CDPH staff transition over to the PHDL.

Topics covered will include:

1. Introduction to the Public Health Digital Library and its resources

2. How to access full text journal articles

3. Exploring some PHDL resources

4. How to create an account to attend online trainings

5. How to get help

These training sessions are free to CDPH staff. A certificate of completion will be available for those who attend the class.

Debbie Jan
Public Health Library
(510) 642-2510


Sacramento Instruction: Public Health Digital Library Hands-On

Wednesday, June 27, 10:30am-12:00pm
East End Complex TBD, Sacramento

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RSVP by Tuesday, June 26th to Michael Sholinbeck at
msholinb@library.berkeley.edu or (510) 642-2510.
Please obtain your supervisor’s approval before you RSVP.

————————-

Class Objective: Introduce the Public Health Digital Library resources to CDPH staff and show how to retrieve journals articles via your desktop.

Supervisors: Please encourage your staff to attend if appropriate.

The Public Health Library contract with CDPH ends June 30, 2018. At that time, CDPH will fully move over to the Public Health Digital Library (PHDL) provided by the National Public Health Coordination Office at the University of Massachusetts Medical School Lamar Soutter Library. This class will help CDPH staff transition over to the PHDL.

Topics covered will include:

1. Introduction to the Public Health Digital Library and its resources

2. How to access full text journal articles

3. Exploring some PHDL resources

4. How to create an account to attend online trainings

5. How to get help

These training sessions are free to CDPH staff. A certificate of completion will be available for those who attend the class.

Debbie Jan
Public Health Library
(510) 642-2510


Professional Development: How to Communicate Effectively, Even When It’s Hard

Are you looking to improve your communication skills? Do you want tools that can help you improve the morale and quality of your workplace? Then this class might help!

We have more electronic tools than ever to help us stay in what may seem like constant contact with each other. Poor communication skills, however, can counteract those advances and be the bane of your work life. They can lead to never-ending email threads, unproductive meetings, confusing feedback, and disorganized project management.

Good communication skills, however, between bosses and workers, or between co-workers, can significantly improve the conditions and quality of work. One technique that can help is called Emotional Intelligence (EI).

In this class, you’ll learn:

* What EI is, why it’s important, and how to handle yourself and your relationships in ways that strengthen personal communication and leadership
* How to approach work styles and personality differences thoughtfully and effectively
* Practical tips and tools you can take with you and start implementing at your workplace tomorrow

Date: Thursday, June 14
Time: 11:00am – noon PT
Price: Free
Training provider: NextGen Nation


Conservation as a Public Health Strategy for Climate Change Preparedness: A webinar

Want to learn how nature conservation can be an essential component of building community resilience and can play a prominent role in public health planning? This webinar, held on May 9, examines this topic.

Researchers studying climate change have been focused on vulnerable populations and resilience as well as on acute illnesses such as heat exhaustion and zoonoses. This presentation will explore how nature conservation can be an essential component of building community resilience and can play a prominent role in public health planning. We will talk about how nature contributes to social and environmental determinants of health.

Conservation as a Public Health Strategy for Climate Change Preparedness is part of a series sponsored by the National Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health which is funded by funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada. The speaker is Dr. Craig Stephen, Chief Executive Officer of the Canadian Wildlife Health Cooperative.

The BCCDC/NCCEH Environmental Health Seminar Series provides an opportunity for learning and knowledge exchange on a variety of environmental health topics. The seminars can be attended in-person or online and include Cannabis Legalization and Environmental Health, and Policy options for healthier retail food environments in city-regions: The case for a solid measurement foundation among others that may be of interest.


Understanding & Responding to the Lifelong Effects of Opioid Exposure: A webinar

Are you interested in learning more about the impacts of the opioid epidemic on our children and families? Would you like to learn more about what health officials in other state are doing in response? Then you might want to tune in to this webinar hosted by the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO).

The opioid epidemic affects infants, children and families in many ways, from the effects of opioid exposure and withdrawal on infants born to mothers using opioids to the challenge of providing stable care to children while struggling with addiction. These early childhood experiences have lifelong impacts on health and quality of life, and are also significantly impacting state services and systems.

In response to this crisis, health officials across the country are implementing statewide solutions to protect and support families. Join this Live webcast event and learn from researchers, peer health officials, and other national leaders addressing the effects of the opioid epidemic on children and families. The panelists will share innovative approaches to preventing adverse childhood experiences related to opioid use and to promote healthy caregiver-child
relationships that help buffer the effects of trauma. Participants are invited to share their most pressing needs, promising approaches, and experiences, and to pose questions to panelists.

Date: Friday, June 8, 2018
Time: noon – 1:30pm PT
cost: Free (requires free login)
Panelists include:
* Dr. Stephen Patrick, Neonatologist at Vanderbilt University
* Dr. Karen Remley, CEO at American Academy of Pediatrics and former SHO-VA
* Dr. Michael Warren, Deputy Commissioner for Population Health at Tennessee Department of Health
* Moderator: Dr. Monica Bharel, Massachusetts Commissioner of Public Health


New Books!

Here are some new titles available online from the National Academies Press of the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

1. Opportunities for Improving Programs and Services for Children with Disabilities 2018.

2. Improving Health Research on Small Populations: Proceedings of a Workshop 2018.

3. Progress Toward Transforming the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) Program 2018.

4. Exploring Partnership Governance in Global Health: Proceedings of a Workshop 2018.

5. Achieving Rural Health Equity and Well-Being: Proceedings of a Workshop 2018.

Note: UCB Public Health Library book checkouts have stopped to allow time for processing. All books are due June 11th. Also, just a reminder that all library cards expire June 30, 2018 so if you have checked out any books yourself they need to be returned before the contract ends.


CDPH In The News May, 2018

CDPH in the News

Study links wildfire smoke to heart attacks

from VC Star

Smoke exposure from massive wildfires may ramp up the risk of heart attacks, heart failure and coronary disease, according to a new study.
Researchers from UC San Francisco, the California Department of Public Health and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reviewed more than 1 million emergency room visits in eight different California air basins in 2015.

Supe Calls For Investigation Of Possible Radioactive Materials At Keller Canyon Landfill

from SF Gate

Contra Costa County Supervisor Federal Glover is calling for an investigation of allegations that radioactive materials from San Francisco might have been deposited at Keller Canyon Landfill, Glover said Thursday.
Pasadena-based Tetra Tech EC Inc. is alleged to have falsified data in the cleanup of radioactive soil at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard in San Francisco. Contaminated soil may have been deposited at California landfills including Keller Canyon on Bailey Road in unincorporated Contra Costa County near Pittsburg. Tetra Tech first began cleaning up radiation at the former Hunters Point Naval Shipyard in 2002. The area had been slated for redevelopment and was divided up into parcels.
In December, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, along with the California Department of Toxic Substances Control and the California Department of Public Health, independently reviewed the Navy’s report and found further signs of potential falsification, manipulation and data quality concerns at the parcels.

Contra Costa County sues drug companies over opioid epidemic

from Mercury News

Contra Costa County is among 30 California counties suing pharmaceutical manufacturers and distributors for their role in creating a widespread opioid epidemic.
The lawsuit filed by Contra Costa County seeks reimbursement of taxpayer funds that have been spent responding to the opioid epidemic in the county and for ongoing costs, such as emergency response for overdoses, prevention, monitoring and treatment.
The lawsuit filed by Contra Costa County claims the opioid epidemic “is particularly devastating” in the county. Citing information from the California Department of Public Health, the lawsuit says that in 2016, Contra Costa County suffered 53 deaths from opioids, up from 49 in 2015. In 2014, 50 people died from opioid overdoses and 42 people died in 2013.
In 2016, 126 people visited the emergency department due to opioid overdoses, excluding heroin, according to the California Department of Public Health, and 113 people were hospitalized.

DNA of every baby born in California is stored. Who has access to it?

from CBS News

You probably know where your Social Security card, birth certificate and other sensitive information is being stored, but what about your genetic material? If you or your child was born in California after 1983, your DNA is likely being stored by the government, may be available to law enforcement and may even be in the hands of outside researchers, CBS San Francisco’s Julie Watts reports.
Like many states, California collects bio-samples from every child born in the state. The material is then stored indefinitely in a state-run biobank, where it may be purchased for outside research.
It all begins with a crucial and potentially lifesaving blood test. The California Department of Public Health reports that from 2015-2017 alone, the Newborn Screening test diagnosed 2,498 babies with a “serious congenital disorder that, if left untreated could have caused irreparable harm or death.”
But researchers with the California Genetic Disease Screening Program aren’t the only ones with access to samples stored in the biobank.

AHF Blasts California Senate for Nixing $10M for STD Control as Rates Explode in State

from Businesswire

Within 96 hours of the Monday release of a blistering report by the California Department of Public Health showing record rates of STDs in the state, the California Senate Budget Subcommittee on Health today rejected a request from AHF and Essential Access Health for a $10 million increase in the STD control budget at the Department of Public Health.
Chlamydia cases in California are up 9% in 2017; gonorrhea up 16%; and syphilis, up 20%. AHF singles out Senator Richard Pan, who chairs the Senate Budget Subcommittee on Health, for particularly harsh criticism for his shortsightedness.
“The same week the State of California was embarrassed worldwide for its record STD rates, news that was widely reported around the globe, the California Senate shows how completely tone deaf it is and how deeply the members have their heads in the sand,” said AHF [AIDS Healthcare Foundation] President Michael Weinstein.


Public Health Library merges with Bioscience & Natural Resources Library

Bioscience Library
The collections of the Public Health Library will be moved to the Biosciences, Natural Resources & Public Health Library in the Valley Life Sciences Building, shown above. (Photo by J. Pierre Carrillo for the UC Berkeley Library)

On June 4, two important libraries in the Life & Health Sciences Division will come together under one roof as the Marian Koshland Bioscience, Natural Resources & Public Health Library. The Sheldon Margen Public Health Library — located in 1 University Hall, at Oxford Street and University Avenue — will close June 1.

For more details, read the story at Library News.