The Bancroft Library: Homecoming Events, October 13-16

California Crossings Exhibition

Open to the public:
Friday 10:00 am4:00 pm
Curator led tours (limited to the first 30 people):
Friday 1:30 pm2:15 pm
Friday 3:00 pm3:45 pm
California Crossings: Stories of Migration, Relocation, and New Encounters invites the viewer to embrace our state’s rich and diverse history through The Bancroft Library’s unique and rare holdings, including voluminous collections, original manuscripts, drawings, paintings, photographs, rare publications, and prints. Gain new perspectives on often contradictory and competing claims to history from the points of view of the original peoples and national interests that set in motion California’s coming of age.  Go at your own pace anytime on Friday between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., or take a curator-led tour at 1:30 or 3 p.m. Tour space is limited to the first 30 people.
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Bullets Across the Bay Exhibition and Panel
Open to the public:
Friday 1:00 pm6:00 pm
Saturday 10:00 am3:00 pm
Sunday 1:00 pm9:00 pm
Meet the curator:
Friday 3:00 – 4:00 pm
Panel discussion & book signing:
Friday 4:00 – 6:00 pm
Ever since the publication of Dashiell Hammett’s The Maltese Falcon in 1930, San Francisco has been recognized as the birthplace of modern crime fiction. Doe Library’s exhibit, Bullets Across the Bay, examines the Bay Area as a popular setting for mystery and detective novels and highlights the richness of UC Berkeley’s collections for the study of genre fiction.  There will be a special panel discussion and book signing on Friday from 4-6 p.m. in 190 Doe (across from the Morrison Library, north entrance of Doe) with local mystery authors Lucha Corpi, Eddie Muller, Kelli Stanley, and moderator Janet Rudolph.
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Getting to Know Twain: 44 Years with the Mark Twain Papers

Open to the public:
Saturday 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm
Location: TBA
The much anticipated autobiography of legendary author and humorist Mark Twain created an unprecedented buzz before it even hit stores last fall — 100 years after he died. The 756-page tome was published due to the herculean efforts of the Mark Twain Project’s editors, who sometimes uncovered hidden facts that helped get the text right and that shed inadvertent light on the author’s character. Hirst, the project’s general editor, will share examples that he has found during 44 years of combing through Twain’s typescripts, dictations, and notes.

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