Program Evaluation Resources class

Richmond Instruction
Wednesday, February 14, 2018, 10-11am
Room C-140
850 Marina Bay Parkway, Richmond, CA

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RSVP by Tuesday, February 13th to Michael Sholinbeck at
msholinb@library.berkeley.edu or (510) 642-2510.

Please obtain your supervisor’s approval before you RSVP.

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Supervisors: Please encourage your staff to attend if appropriate.

* Do you need to do an evaluation of the programs you offer?
* Are you interested in learning about free online toolkits and other resources that will help you develop a program evaluation?
* Want to learn how to find an online class on program evaluation?
* Want to find resources with examples of other people’s program evaluations?

If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, then please come to the Sheldon Margen Public Health Library’s Program Evaluation class!

Topics covered will include:

1. Resource Toolkits for program evaluation
2. “Best Practices” in program evaluation
3. Finding program evaluation literature
4. Professional tools for program evaluation

Class Objective:
To introduce CDPH staff to quality program evaluation tools and resources that are freely available online. Use of these resources will assist with developing
effective program evaluations.

Please note: This class is NOT a how-to-do program evaluation class, but rather will show resources devoted to program evaluation to help with your work. Health promotion, health communication, and health education resources were covered in the Health Promotion/Health Education Resources class on January 10th and so will not be covered here.

These training sessions are free to CDPH staff. A certificate of completion will be available for those who attend the class.

A schedule of other upcoming training sessions is available online here for you.


Love Data Week 2018 at UC Berkeley

The University Library,  Research IT,  and Berkeley Institute for Data Science will host a series of events on February 12th-16th during the Love Data Week 2018. Love Data Week a nationwide campaign designed to raise awareness about data visualization, management, sharing, and preservation.
Please join us to learn about multiple data services that the campus provides and discover options for managing and publishing your data. Graduate students, researchers, librarians and data specialists are invited to attend these events to gain hands-on experience, learn about resources, and engage in discussion around researchers’ data needs at different stages in their research process.
To register for these events and find out more, please visit: http://guides.lib.berkeley.edu/ldw2018guide

Schedule:
Intro to Scopus APIs –  Learn about working with APIs and how to use the Scopus APIs for text mining.
01:00 – 03:00 p.m., Tuesday, February 13, Doe Library, Room 190 (BIDS)
Refreshments will be provided.

Data stories and Visualization Panel – Learn how data is being used in creative and compelling ways to tell stories. Researchers across disciplines will talk about their successes and failures in dealing with data.
1:00 – 02:45 p.m., Wednesday, February 14, Doe Library, Room 190 (BIDS)
Refreshments will be provided.

Planning for & Publishing your Research Data – Learn why and how to manage and publish your research data as well as how to prepare a data management plan for your research project.
02:00 – 03:00 p.m., Thursday, February 15, Doe Library, Room 190 (BIDS)

Hope to see you there!

–Yasmin

Richmond Instruction: Health Promotion/Health Education Resources class

Wednesday, January 10, 2018, 10-11am
Room C-136
850 Marina Bay Parkway, Richmond, CA

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RSVP by Tuesday, January 9th to Michael Sholinbeck at
msholinb@library.berkeley.edu or (510) 642-2510.

Please obtain your supervisor’s approval before you RSVP.

————————-

Supervisors: Please encourage your staff to attend if appropriate.

* Does your work at CDPH involve health promotion, health communication, or health education?

* Are you interested in learning about toolkits and other resources that will help you develop a health intervention program?

* Interested in how to find literature on health education/promotion topics?

* Do you need to develop consumer health handouts?

* Want to know about quality sources for consumer health information, including non-English language handouts and materials?

If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, then please come to the Sheldon Margen Public Health Library’s Health Promotion and Health Education Resources class!

Topics covered will include:
1. Resource Toolkits for Developing Programs
2. “Best Practices” in Health Education/Promotion
3. Finding Health Education Literature
4. Patient/Consumer Health Education Materials

(This class will not cover program evaluation resources; there will be a separate Program Evaluation Resources class on Wed. Feb. 14, 2018.)

Class Objective:
To introduce CDPH staff to quality health promotion and health education tools and resources that are freely available online. Use of these resources will assist with efficiently developing effective, evidence-based health promotion programs.

These training sessions are free to CDPH staff. A certificate of completion will be available for those who attend the class.

A schedule of other upcoming training sessions is available online.


From the Oral History Center Director – OHC and Education

For an office that does not offer catalog-listed courses, the Oral History Center is still deeply invested in — and engaged with — the teaching mission of the university.

For over 15 years, our signature educational program has been our annual Advanced Oral History Summer Institute. Started by OHC interviewer emeritus Lisa Rubens in 2002 and now headed up by staff historian Shanna Farrell, this week-long seminar attracts about 40 scholars every year. Past attendees have come from most states in the union and internationally too — from Ireland and South Korea, Argentina and Japan, Australia and Finland. The Summer Institute, applications for which are now being accepted, follows the life cycle of the interview, with individual days devoted to topics such as “Project Planning” and “Analysis and Interpretation.”

In 2015 we launched the Introduction to Oral History Workshop, which was created with the novice oral historian in mind, or individuals who simply wanted to learn a bit more about the methodology but didn’t necessarily have a big project to undertake. Since then, a diverse group of undergraduate students, attorneys, authors, psychologists, genealogists, park rangers, and more have attended the annual workshop. This year’s workshop will be held on Saturday February 3rd and registration is now open.

In addition to these formal, regularly scheduled events, OHC historians and staff often speak to community organizations, local historical societies, student groups, and undergraduate and graduate research seminars. If you’d like to learn more about what we do at the Center and about oral history in general, please drop us a note! 

OHC student employees Hailie O'Bryan and Pilar Montenegro
OHC student employees Hailie O’Bryan and Pilar Montenegro in front of our “blue wall of transcripts”

In recent years we have had the opportunity to work closely with a small group of Berkeley undergrads: our student employees. Although the Center has employed students for many decades, only in the past few years have they come to play such an integral role in and make such important contributions to our core activities. Students assist with the production of transcripts, including entering narrator corrections and writing tables of contents; they work alongside David Dunham, our lead technologist, in creating metadata for interviews and editing oral history audio and video; and they partner with interviewers to conduct background research into our narrators and the topics we interview them about. With these contributions, students have helped the Center in very real, measurable ways, most importantly by enabling an increase in productivity: the past few years have been some of the most productive in terms of hours of interviews conducted in the Center’s history. We also like to think that by providing students with intellectually challenging, real-world assignments, we are contributing to their overall educational experience too.

As 2017 draws to a close, I join my Oral History Center colleagues Paul Burnett, David Dunham, Shanna Farrell, and Todd Holmes in thanking our amazing student employees: Aamna Haq, Carla Palassian, Hailie O’Bryan, Maggie Deng (who wrote her first contribution to our newsletter this issue), Nidah Khalid, Pilar Montenegro, Vincent Tran, and Marisa Uribe!

Martin Meeker, Charles B. Faulhaber Director of the Oral History Center


Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) workshop

Ingenuity Pathway Analysis

A representative from Qiagen will offer a hands-on training workshop on using IPA to interpret expression data (including RNA-seq).

Date: Thursday, Nov. 9
Time: 1:30-4:30 pm
Location: Bioscience Library Training Room, 2101 Valley Life Sciences Building

You are invited to participate in this free training, and are encouraged to bring your own laptop or use the computer workstations in our training room.

Please register if you are interested in attending.

The workshop will cover how to:

  • Format, upload your data, and launch an analysis
  • Identify likely pathways that are expressed
  • Find causal regulators and their directional effect on gene functions and diseases
  • Build pathways, make connections between entities, and overlay multiple datasets on a pathway or network
  • Understand the affected biological processes
  • Perform a comparison analysis: utilize a heat map to easily visualize trends across multiple time points or samples

Questions? Please contact Elliott Smith (esmith@library.berkeley.edu)


Great talks and fun at csv,conf,v3 and Carpentry Training

On May 2 – 5 2017, I (Yasmin AlNoamany) was thrilled to attend the csv,conf,v3 2017 conference and the Software/Data Carpentry instructor training in Portland, Oregon, USA. It was a unique experience to attend and speak with many people who are passionate about data and open science.

The csv,conf,v3

The csv,conf is for data makers from academia, industry, journalism, government, and open source. We had amazing four keynotes by Mike Rostock, the creator of the D3.js (JavaScript library for visualization data), Angela Bassa, the Director of Data Science at iRobot, Heather Joseph, the Executive Director of SPARC, and Laurie Allen, the lead Digital Scholarship Group at the University of Pennsylvania Libraries. The conference had four parallel sessions and a series of workshops about data. Check out the full schedule from here.

I presented on the second day about generating stories from archived data, which entitled “Using Web Archives to Enrich the Live Web Experience Through Storytelling”. Check out the slides of my talk below.

 

I demonstrated the steps of the proposed framework, the Dark and Stormy Archives (DSA), in which, we identify, evaluate, and select candidate Web pages from archived collections that summarize the holdings of these collections, arrange them in chronological order, and then visualize these pages using tools that users already are familiar with, such as Storify. For more information about this work, check out this post.

The csv,conf deserved to won the conference of the year prize for bringing the CommaLlama. The Alpaca brought much joy and happiness to all conference attendees. It was fascinating to be in csv,conf 2017 to meet and hear from passionate people from everywhere about data.

After the conference, Max Odgen from the Dat Data Project gave us a great tour from the conference venue to South Portland. We had a great food from street food trucks at Portland, then we had a great time with adorable neighborhood cats!

Tha Carpentry Training

After the csv,conf, I spent two days with other 30 librarians and researchers from different backgrounds to learn how to instruct Data Carpentry, Software Carpentry, and Library Carpentry.  There were three CLIR fellows, John Borghi, Veronica Ikeshoji-Orlati, and myself, attended the training. Completing this training prepares attendees to teach Data Carpentry, Software Carpentry, and Library Carpentry lessons. The Carpentry training is a global movement for teaching scientists in different disciplines the computing skills they need to empower data-driven research and encourage open science.

The two days had a mix of lectures and hands-on exercises about learning philosophy and Carpentry teaching practices. It was a unique and fascinating experience to have. We had two energetic instructors, Tim Dennis and Belinda Weaver, who generated welcoming and collaborate environment for us. Check out the full schedule and lessons from here.

At the end, I would like to acknowledge the support I had from the California Digital Library and the committee of the csv,conf for giving me this amazing opportunity to attend and speak at the csv,conf and the Carpentry instructor training. I am looking forward to applying what I learned in upcoming Carpentry workshops at UC Berkeley.

–Yasmin


Professional Development: Best Practices for Project Management Success

Want to learn more about project management principles and theories? Want to see examples of best practices? Then this free edX class might be of interest to you!

The course will cover:

* project management methods and best practices
* project portfolio management
* the project management office
* Six Sigma
* corporate culture and organizational behavior
* project management leadership

This course is part of the Rochester Institute of Technology MicroMasters Program that is designed to teach the importance of the organizational and leadership characteristics for the success of projects.

Begins: May 31, 2017
Length: 11 weeks
Cost: Free with the option to add a Verified Certificate for $150

More information is available on the edX website.


Healthcare Data Analytics, Population Health, and Value Based Care: Free online training

Healthcare Data Analytics, Population Health, and Value Based Care are being offered as asynchronous online training classes by Johns Hopkins University and Normandale Community College. All three are free through 6/20/2017 from the ONC (Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT) for those working in healthcare or a field related to healthcare.

Each of the three tracks offers 2-3 classes taking from 6-12 hours to complete. Courses will remain open for 4 weeks once begun.


Love Your Data Week 2017

Love Your Data (LYD) Week is a nationwide campaign designed to raise awareness about research data management, sharing, and preservation. In UC Berkeley, the University Library and the Research Data Management program will host a set of events that will be held from February 13th-17th to encourage and teach researchers how to manage, secure, publish, and license their data. Presenters will describe groundbreaking research on sensitive or restricted data and explore services needed to unlock the research potential of restricted data.

Graduate students, researchers, librarians and data specialists are invited to attend these events and learn multiple data services that the campus provides.

Schedule
To register for these events and find out more, please visit our LYD Week 2017 guide:

  • Securing Research Data  Explore services needed to unlock the research potential of restricted data.
    11:00 am-12:00 pm, Tuesday, February 14, Doe Library, Room 190 (BIDS)
    For more background on the Securing Research Data project, please see this RIT News article.
  • RDM Tools & Tips: Box and Drive – Learn the best practices for using Box and bDrive to manage documents, files, and other digital assets.
    10:30 am-11:45 am, Wednesday, February 15, Doe Library, Room 190 (BIDS)
    Refreshments are provided by the UC Berkeley Library.
  • Research Data Publishing and Licensing – This workshop covers why and how to publish and license your research data.
    11:00 am-12:00 pm, Thursday, February 16, Doe Library, Room 190 (BIDS)

The presenters will share practical tips, resources, and stories to help researchers at different stages in their research process.

Sponsored and organized by the UC Berkeley Library and the Research Data Management. Contact yasmin@berkeley.edu or quinnd@berkeley.edu with questions.

—–

Yasmin AlNoamany


Richmond Instruction: *NEW* Environmental Health Resources class

Thursday, January 5, 2017, 10:00am-11:00am
Building C, Room 136
850 Marina Bay Parkway, Richmond, CA

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RSVP by Wednesday, January 4th to Michael Sholinbeck at msholinb@library.berkeley.edu or (510) 642-2510.
Please obtain your supervisor’s approval before you RSVP.

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Supervisors: Please encourage your staff to attend if appropriate.

* Does your work at CDPH require you to access environmental health information, data, or other resources?

* Are you interested in learning about tools to help you find everything from environmental legislation, to continuing education sources, to environmental screening methods?

* Interested in environmental health topics like environmental justice, climate change, or nanotechnology?

If you answered “Yes” to any of these questions, then please come to the Sheldon Margen Public Health Library’s Environmental Health Resources class!

Topics covered will include:

1. Tools for data visualization, continuing education, site assessment, and more
2. Information on selected topics in environmental health
3. Finding environmental health literature
4. Environmental health data sources

Class Objective:

To introduce CDPH staff to quality environmental health tools and resources that are freely available online. Use of these resources will assist with finding environmental health data, literature, and more; and in developing evidence-based environmental health programs.

These training sessions are free to CDPH staff. A certificate of completion will be available for those who attend the class.

A schedule of other upcoming training sessions is available online for you so that you can plan for upcoming classes