Primary Sources: British Periodicals


The Library now has access to three modules of the primary source collection, British Periodicals. This digitized and searchable resource is made up of collections previously available on microfilm — English Literary Periodicals and Early British Periodicals — and includes nearly 500 publications from the 17th century through to the early 21st century.

English Literary Periodicals (also known ELP) includes over 341 periodicals, published in Great Britain during the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, that are predominantly literary in nature. Besides literary reviews there are also theatrical, satirical, political, religious, and women’s magazines, such as Monthly Review and Critical Review.

Early British Periodicals is a supplement to ELP, consisting of additional 168 titles (1681-1921), and includes titles such as Quarterly Review and Edinburgh Review.

Search results can be filtered to article type and downloaded in either PDF or JPEG format.


Primary Sources: Independent Voices

cover of Berkeley Barb issue

Independent Voices is a digital collection of magazines, journals, newspapers, and newsletters housed in the alternative and small press archives of participating libraries and historical institutions.

The focus is on materials published during the 1960s-1980s that stem primarily from the second wave of feminism, LGBT activism, GI and student protest movements, and the Black, Chicano(a), and Native American movements.


Primary Sources: Scientific American Archive (1845-2005) and Scientific American Supplement & Builders Archive Collection

UC Berkeley now has access to both the Scientific American Archive (1845-2005) and Scientific American Supplement & Builders Archive Collection, which were licensed by the California Digital Library. CDL shared this information about the resource:

“Scientific American is the “oldest continually published magazine in the U.S.” Thus, its archive is an amazing resource, providing a wealth of historic information in all areas of science and technology. The coverage, going back to the first four-page issue published in 1845, and the quality of the documents–both text and images–is excellent. The archive is divided into four segments, 2005-1993, 1992-1948, 1947-1910, and 1909-1845, and includes some 133,000 articles. Good-quality PDFs are available for the entire archive; users can even browse an entire issue as a PDF file. There are options for both basic and advanced searching via Nature.com’s interface. Since the coverage goes back more than 160 years, the archive contains interesting articles by or about many noted scientists. For example, a 1955 issue of Scientific American features an interview with Albert Einstein, and there are articles by and about Linus Pauling, Francis Crick, and James Watson, to name a few.


“Additionally, the Supplement & Builders Archive Collection has also been licensed. The recently digitized Scientific American Supplement & Builders Archive Collection provides access to more than 2,500 issues from the Supplement and Builders publications. Together, these five collections provide unique insight into historic breakthroughs in science, technology, medicine and architecture.”


Browse journals on your tablet or iPhone

browzine

Image Source

 

Browse, read, and monitor thousands of scholarly journals on your tablet or iPhone/iPod Touch with the BrowZine app.

Create a personal bookshelf of favorite journals, be alerted when new issues are published, and save articles to Zotero, Mendeley, Dropbox, and more.

Get started on your tablet (iPad, Android, Kindle Fire HD) or iPhone/iPod Touch in three easy steps:

  1. Go to your app store, search for BrowZine and download for free.
  2. Open the app, and select our library, University of California, Berkeley, from the listing.
  3. Afterwards, use AirBears or set up the campus VPN to begin reading scholarly journals from the Library.

Learn more about BrowZine from our guide and check out the Introduction to BrowZine video from Third Iron.

Happy browsing!

by Jeffery Loo, Cheminformatics Librarian

Contact me at jloo [at] library.berkeley.edu


New Tool: BrowZine – Read scholarly journals on your mobile device

The Library has a new tool available for your use that allows you to view on (most) mobile devices complete issues of scholarly journals that the Library subscribes to. You can choose up to 64 titles for your personal BrowZine library and view entire issues of a publication as you would the print version.  Issues are automatically added when available in our electronic collections and articles can be saved (for reading offline) to your portable device or synced to other services such as Dropbox, Box.com, Mendeley, Zotero and RefWorks.

BrowZine currently has interfaces for iPad, iPhone, Android Tablet (Google Nexus, Samsung Galaxy Tab) and the Kindle Tablet (Fire HD).  To download a free copy of the application click on the Apple Store, Google Play or Amazon link on your portable device and search for BrowZine.

If you are on campus, once you install the application you can easily access our paid content.  To access it from off campus, you also need to install a VPN client on your device. It may seem complicated, but today during a presentation on the tool I downloaded the VPN client and the BrowZine app on my iPhone, registered my account, and added three journals to my bookshelf within ten minutes.  More information and instructions for installing are available. You are always welcome to contact me for assistance.


new journals in Cairn

L'autre

This spring Cairn, an aggregator of French-language journals, added about 35 new titles from many different disciplines to its collection. Though these do not yet appear in OskiCat or in the E-Journal Titles A-Z list, they can be accessed directly via Cairn’s website or by clicking on the links below:

The entire list of 370 journal titles are available through the Library’s subscription to Cairn.


database trial to L’Harmatheque

L'Harmathèque

Through its membership in the Center for Research Libraries and more specifically CIFNAL, the  Library has trial access to L’Harmathèque – a large collection of French language ebooks, articles, films and audio files – through Wednesday, May 1.

Collection Content
L’Harmathèque’s multimedia platform offers ebooks, articles, videos, and audio recordings on many subjects in the humanities and social sciences. The content of the ebooks comes from a variety of French publishing imprints, including L’Harmattan, Pagala, Odin, IXE, etc.  A full list of included titles can be downloaded in excel.

Currently the platform contains more than 26,000 ebooks, 17,000 articles, 400 films, and 600 audio files available. At least 2,300 new titles are added to the collection annually (the publishers estimate that around 230 ebook titles are added monthly). This impressive number of ebooks covers a wide range of subject areas in the humanities and social sciences, novels, and children’s books.

According to the description provided on the web site, article content is from journals and book chapters, although no further selection criteria are given. The videos are primarily documentaries and theatrical productions. The audio collection includes many audiobooks, in a variety of languages.

Delivery
The interface is in French. In the portals, ebooks are divided by subject into browsable bouquets. An advanced search option allows the user to narrow down the large amount of content.

Ebooks can be read either on the platform’s online reader (which requires Flash), or downloaded and read using the free Adobe Digital Editions reader.  Viewing the videos requires the use of DivX and  the audio content is also available through Flash.


In Hathi We Trust

Over the summer library bits, bots, and elves have been hard at work batch loading hundreds of thousands of HathiTrust records for the digitized versions of public domain items into OskiCat. As you search for books and other library materials, you’ll undoubtedly begin to encounter these new records for materials published prior to 1923. Here is just a sampling of the kinds of digitized texts in the HathiTrust Digital Library and that are now discoverable through OskiCat:

  • Blanco y negro (1891-1922) – all issues prior to 1923 for the illustrated cultural journal from Madrid.
  • Chiaroscuro (1921) – Grazia Deledda
  • Dante e Firenze; prose antiche con note illustrative ed appendici di Oddone Zenatti (1902)
  • A comedia portugueza (1888-1889) – illustrated political-cultural weekly published in Lisbon by Marcellino Mesquita with caricatures by Julião Machado
  • La critica letteraria nel rinascimento (1905) – Joel Elias Spingarn
  • Grammaire de l’ancien Provençal ou ancienne langue d’oc (1921) par Joseph Anglade
  • Oeuvres complètes – Honoré de Balzac . – 24 vols. from 1869-79 Michel Lévy Frères edition.
  • I poeti futuristi (1912) … con un proclama di F.T.  Marinetti e uno studio sul verso libero di Paolo Buzzi.
  • Les poètes maudits (1888) – Paul Verlaine ; ornée de six portraits par Luque.
  • Poetes valencians contemporanis (1908)
  • Revue historique de la révolution française (1910-1922)
  • Souvenirs littéraires – Maxime du Camp (1892)
  • When the project is complete, there will be over one million new records in OskiCat. You can limit a search to these by combining “hathitrust” with some other keyword(s), such as hathitrust roma or hathitrust “victor hugo”, etc.

    Public domain means that the items are not protected by copyright. U.S. government documents and works published before 1923 are examples of items in the public domain. All users can view the full-text of these books online. UC Berkeley faculty, staff, and students can download the whole book (PDF) by logging in with your CalNet ID.

    This service is possible because the University of California libraries are partners in HathiTrust (pronounced “hah-tee”), a national project to create a shared archive of books scanned into electronic format.

    This is a remixed and updated version of a library blog post from June 18, 2012.


    New Library Subject Pages

    Some of you may have already noticed that the three subject home pages for the Romance Language Collections have gradually taken on a new look and feel this fall. This is part of an effort in the Doe/Moffitt Libraries to transform the functionality of the former static html pages. While the content may appear the same, open-source Library à la Carte software, developed at Oregon State University enables us to quickly update the content and repurpose some of the content modules to create dynamic library course guides such as French 142AC: the Cultures of Franco-America, French 102: Writing in French, Italian 5B, and Spanish 107: Survey of Spanish Literature .

    Continue reading “New Library Subject Pages”