Summer reading: My Twentieth Century Evening and Other Small Breakthroughs

My Twentieth Century Evening book cover

My Twentieth Century Evening and Other Small Breakthroughs
Kazuo Ishiguro

In his 2017 Nobel Lecture in Literature, My Twentieth Century Evening and Other Small Breakthroughs, Kazuo Ishiguro recounts his childhood when he moved in 1960 with his parents from Japan to England, where they were the only Japanese family in the town where they settled. Looking back, he is amazed that although it was less than 20 years after the end of WWII, the English community accepted them with “openness and instinctive generosity.” His identity is shaped by this openness as he ventures into his writing, where he surprisingly starts to emotionally construct his own idea of Japan.

This emotional construct, he comes to realize, is due to the importance of relationships — relationships that “move us, amuse us, anger us, surprise us” — and due to finding meaning in the “small, scruffy moments” that seemingly allow writers to be vulnerable in experiencing the unknown and the elusive and in finding meaningful exchanges through human encounters.

His hope is for us not to be complacent, but to embrace diversity, to include many voices and be open to new ideas — to listen. What starts out as his appeal to literature and writers is also an appeal to combat “dangerously increasing division,” reminding us of his first encounter in England, of openness and generosity.

This book is part of the 2017 Berkeley Summer Reading List. Stay tuned for more weekly posts!


Summer reading list: The Handmaid’s Tale

The Handmaid's Tale book cover
The Handmaid’s Tale
by Margaret Atwood

This year’s selection for On the Same Page, our campus-wide book-in-common program, is Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale. This remarkable novel is at once a classic and all too contemporary in its themes and concerns. It reminds us that humankind’s darkest moments (past, present, or future) inspire the most courageous acts of resistance. Read The Handmaid’s Tale over the summer, attend Atwood’s keynote event on campus on August 23, and prepare to be inspired to create the light you want to see in the world.

Alix Schwartz
Director of Academic Planning
College of Letters & Science


Movies @ Moffitt: Mankiller

Mankiller movie poster

A film by Valerie Red-Horse Mohl

Wednesday, May 2, 2018
Doors @ 6:30pm, show @ 7:00pm
405 Moffitt Library
Free; open to UCB students only (UCB student ID required)

“This is the story of an American hero and legend, one who stands tall amongst the likes of Robert Kennedy, Harriet Tubman, and Martin Luther King, Jr. — and yet few people know her name. Wilma Mankiller is someone who humbly defied the odds to fight injustice and give a voice to the voiceless. She overcame rampant sexism and personal challenges to emerge as the Cherokee Nation’s first female Principal Chief in 1985. MANKILLER examines the legacy of the formidable Wilma Mankiller and reunites the documentary team of Gale Anne Hurd and Valerie Red-Horse Mohl for their third and most powerful film.” — Good Docs website

Watch the trailer and visit the website.


FSM Café Event: Elephant’s Dream

Elephant's Dream
ELEPHANT’S DREAM
A film by Kristof Bilsen
Followed by discussion with the director/producer
Doe Library, Room 180 UC Berkeley
Monday, April 16, 2018 6-8p.m.

Set in war-torn Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Elephant’s Dream is a breathtaking documentary that captures the daily lives of Congolese street-level civil servants in Kinshasa and Bas-Congo. Kristof Bilsen’s documentary is a long overdue testimony to the courage of the men and women who, against all odds, continue to build society and resilience.

Neglected by conventional portrayals of this vast country nested at the heart of sub-Saharan Africa, these stories reveal the complexities, ambiguities, and challenges of living in a postcolonial nation marked by widespread conflict, political crises and economic collapse. Taking Henriette, the post office counter clerk, Simon, the train station officer and Lieutenant, the chief fire fighter out of international oblivion, this documentary successfully achieves the feat of taking its viewers far beyond the habitual clichés and into the tough path of a self-reflexive voyage.

This event is free, open to the public, and all are invited to participate. For more information: contact fsmprograms@lists.berkeley.edu

Sponsored by the University Library’s Free Speech Movement (FSM) Educational Programs Committee, the UC Berkeley Department of Geography, and the UC Berkeley Center for African Studies.

The Library attempts to offer programs in accessible, barrier-free settings. If you think you may require disability-related accommodations, please contact us — ideally at least two weeks prior to the event: fsmprograms@lists.berkeley.edu, 510-768-7618.


April 5: Lunch Poems featuring Matthew Zapruder

Matthew Zapruder

Thursday, April 5
12:10 p.m. – 12:50 p.m.
Morrison Library in Doe Library
Admission Free

Matthew Zapruder is the author most recently of Sun Bear and Why Poetry, a book of prose about poetry. An Associate Professor in the MFA program at Saint Mary’s College of California, he is also Editor at Large at Wave Books, and from 2016-7 was Editor of the Poetry Column for the New York Times Magazine. He lives in Oakland, CA.


April Library Tours

Library Tours

Every Monday and Friday in April
1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

April is a month when students and families visit campus, trying to decide if Cal will be their future home. If you are are visiting campus, you are encouraged to come see the the Library.

Tours of the historic Doe Library, underground Main stacks, and newly renovated Moffitt Undergraduate Library are given every Monday and Friday in April. They start on the north steps of the Doe Library. You are encouraged to sign up using this form as space is limited.


Movies @ Moffitt: Ovarian Psycos

Ovarian Psycos

A film by Joanna Sokolowski and Kate Trumbull-Lavalle

Wednesday, April 4, 2018
Doors @ 6:30pm, show @ 7:00pm
405 Moffitt Library
Free; open to UCB students only (UCB student ID required)

Riding at night through streets deemed dangerous in Eastside Los Angeles, the Ovarian Psycos use their bicycles to confront the violence in their lives… The film Ovarian Psycos rides along with the Ovas, exploring the impact of the group’s activism, born of feminist ideals, indigenous understanding and an urban/-hood mentality, on neighborhood women and communities as they confront injustice, racism, and violence, and take back their streets one ride at a time.

View the trailer and visit the website.


Mindfulness & Meditation @ Moffitt

Meditation

Overcome insomnia & stress.  Focus the mind. Foster creativity, resiliency & well-being. No previous experience required.

  • Open to students, staff, and faculty in the Cal community (UCB ID required to enter Moffitt Library)
  • Dress comfortably & avoid eating immediately before session
  • Participants will benefit most from regular practice

5th Floor Moffitt in the Wellness RoomThis event is free, open to the public, and all are invited to participate. Sponsored by the University Library and the Tang Center. For more information: contact Gisele Tanasse at gtanasse@library.berkeley.edu

Jeff OxendineMindfulness Mondays
12:30pm-1:30pm
Jeffrey Oxendine
School of Public Health
As the Executive Director of the Center for Public Health Practice & Leadership, Jeff is passionate about empowering students in their studies and future careers through mindfulness.

 

Amelia BariliMeditation Wednesdays
3pm-4pm
Amelia Barili
Department of Spanish & Portuguese
An internationally respected yoga teacher, Amelia has a diploma in Yoga Therapy & Philosophy from Kaivalyadhama Yoga institute and uses meditation techniques in her classes to help students to overcome stress and foster creativity.

 

The Library attempts to offer programs in accessible, barrier-free settings. If you think you may require disability-related accommodations, please contact us — ideally at least two weeks prior to the event: jean.ferguson@berkeley.edu.


March 10 FSM event: Free Speech, Civility, and Democratic Engagement

Free Speech, Civility, and Democratic Engagement

Free Speech Movement Café
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley
Saturday, March 10, 2018 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

Presented by the Class of ’68 and the Center on Civility and Democratic Engagement at the Goldman School of Public Policy

“CAN’T WE ALL JUST GET ALONG?”
Breaching ideological echo chambers and the role of civility. A unique opportunity for students and the Cal community to engage in small group discussions with members of the Class of ’68.

10:00 a.m. Breakfast — alumni and students gather
10:25 a.m. Welcome and introductions
10:40 a.m. CENTER ON CIVILITY AND DEMOCRATIC ENGAGEMENT

  • Goldman School of Public Policy, Dean Henry Brady
  • Mission and activities of the Center,
  • Dan Lindheim ’68, faculty director; Larry Rosenthal, program director
11:30 a.m. STUDENT AND ALUMNI ENGAGEMENT

  • Small Group Discussion: Breaching ideological echo chambers and the role of civility
12:20 p.m. CENTER SPONSORED STUDENTS IN ACTION

  • Undergraduate student Viviana Morales ’18, UCDC internship
  • Goldman School of Public Policy graduate student Rawan Elhalaby, Advanced Policy Analysis Project
12:50 p.m. Class of ’68 5oth reunion and Class of ’18 involvement
Wrap-up
1:00 p.m. Adjourn

This event is free, open to the public, and all are invited to participate. Sponsored by the University Library’s Free Speech Movement (FSM) Café

Programs Committee. For more information: contact fsmprograms@lists.berkeley.edu.

The Library attempts to o er programs in accessible, barrier-free settings. If you think you may require disability-related accommodations, please contact us prior to the event: fsmprograms@lists.berkeley.edu, 510-768-7618.


Movies @ Moffitt: Anthropocene

Anthropocene

Wednesday, March 7, 2018
Doors @ 6:30pm, show @ 7:00pm
405 Moffitt Library
Free; open to UCB students only (UCB student ID required)

A Working Group of international scientists is deciding whether to declare a new geological epoch — the Anthropocene — with the Earth shaped more by mankind than nature. Its members tell the story of the Anthropocene and argue whether it’s a tragedy, a comedy, or something more surreal. With archival footage, award-winning stills and interviews, [the film] proposes a common secular narrative for mankind but leaves viewers to decide how we should write the ending.

View the trailer and visit the website.