Event: Bancroft Library Roundtable: “From Kitchen Tables to Laboratories: Nutritional Science at UC Berkeley, 1895-1930”

The third Bancroft Library Roundtable will take place in the Lewis-Latimer Room of The Faculty Club at noon on Thursday, April 19. Kimberly Killion, doctoral candidate in history at UC Berkeley and Bancroft Library Study Award recipient, will present “From Kitchen Tables to Laboratories: Nutritional Science at UC Berkeley, 1895-1930.”

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During the late nineteenth century, scientists from various fields began conducting experiments that would change the way most Americans defined, chose, and related to food. Forming the nascent field of nutritional science, this network of scientists included UC Berkeley’s first professor of nutrition, Myer Jaffa, who began conducting research on human nutrition in the 1890s. This research largely took place at the tables of his subjects, where he observed their dietary choices and health. By 1930, when Professor Agnes Fay Morgan led nutritional research at Berkeley, the science had shifted dramatically from field research to laboratory research. Drawing from the Jaffa and Morgan collections housed in The Bancroft Library, Killion will discuss the development of nutritional science on campus during a transformative period in American food history.

We hope to see you there.

José Adrián Barragán-Álvarez and Kathi Neal

Bancroft Library Staff


Primary Sources: Presidential Recordings Digital Edition

The Library has acquired Presidential Recordings Digital Edition, an online portal for annotated transcripts of telephone conversations of Presidents Johnson, Kennedy, and Nixon. Recordings and transcripts are presented together. The transcripts are searchable and browseable by administration, series, speaker, date, place, and duration.

 


Event: Showing of Elephant’s Dream followed by a discussion with the Director/Producer

flier for event Elephant’s Dream
A film by Kristof Bilsen
Doe Library, Room 180
UC Berkeley
Monday, April 16, 2018
6-8pm

Followed by discussion with the Director / Producer

Set in war-torn Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Elephant’s Dream is a breath-taking documentary that captures the daily lives of Congolese street-level civil servants in Kinshasa and Bas-Congo. Kristof Bilsen’s documentary is a long overdue testimony to the courage of the men and women who, against all odds, continue to build society and resilience.

This event is free, open to the public, and all are invited to participate. Sponsored by the University Library’s Free Speech Movement (FSM) Educational Programs Committee, the UC Berkeley Department of Geography, and the UC Berkeley Center for African Studies.


Workshop: Want to learn how to make 2D into 3D?

Photogrammetry Workshop

Friday, April 6
3-4pm
Moffitt Library
Makerspace on 1st Floor

Learn about this technique in a one hour workshop presented by Scott McAvoy from UC San Diego. Scott will walk you through the process, show you the software, and will give a demonstration of how photogrammetry works. He will be available for questions on your photogrammetry or 3D project after the workshop.

Sign up at http://ucblib.link/photogrammetry

This event is free and open to the Cal community. UCB ID required to enter Moffitt Library.

The Library attempts to offer programs in accessible, barrier-free settings. If you think you may require disability-related accommodations, please contact: jean.ferguson@berkeley.edu, 510-768-7618.


Deadline for Library Prize for Undergraduate Research coming up soon!

We are accepting submissions for the Charlene Conrad Liebau Library Prize for Undergraduate Research now through April 12, 2018! Undergraduate students of all levels and disciplines may apply. We especially welcome submissions from lower division students, whose projects are judged separately from those of the upper division. More details are available on the website. http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/researchprize

Works in progress are eligible. Submissions are open to research projects from a UCB course in one of the following terms:
Lower division prize: Spring 2017, Summer 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018
Upper division prize: Summer 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018


Primary Sources: Manchurian Daily News Online

logo for collectionThe Library has recently acquired the digital archive of the Manchurian Daily News and associated publications Manchuria Magazine, Manchuria Month, Contemporary Manchuria, and the Manchurian Information Bulletin. As described on the Brill website, this resource “offers scholars of Japan’s modern history an unparalleled inside view of Japan’s agenda in Manchuria and its plans for domination in Asia. Founded in 1908 in the wake of Japan’s victory in the war against Russia, the Manchuria Daily News set up in Dalian (Darien) at the headquarters of the South Manchuria Railway Company (Minami Manshū Tetsudō Kabushiki-gaisha) (SMR).
“Lavishly funded from Tokyo, and with the full resources of the SMR Research Department behind them, the Manchuria Daily News and the associated titles offered here constitute a formidable record of Japanese policy on Manchuria and the Manchoukuo project. From 1908-1940 this compact, feisty daily and its associated titles responded to the exigencies of the day, taking requests from a variety of official and often competing propaganda bureaux. In the Manchuria Daily News and in these associated publications, the SMR presented a powerful case for the Japanese leadership of Asia, after 1932 using Manchoukuo as a showcase for Japan’s technological, cultural and political advancement.”


Primary Sources: Ogonek Digital Archive (DA-OGN) 1923-2017

The Library has acquired the Ogonek Digital Archive 1923-2017.

Ogonek is one of the oldest weekly magazines in Russia, having been in continuous publication since 1923. Throughout its illustrious history Ogonek has published original works by such Soviet cultural luminaries as Vladimir Mayakovsky, Isaac Babel, Ilya Ilf and Evgeny Petrov, Yevgeny Yevtushenko, the photographer Yuri Rost, and others. It first saw the rise of its stock under the editorial guidance of Mikhail Koltsov, a star Soviet reporter, who oversaw the growth of Ogonek from a readership of 25,000 in 1923 to nearly half a million within a mere two year period, turning it into one of the most influential and widely read Soviet publications of the period. Its popularity was left intact even after Koltsov’s arrest on the eve of the WWII in 1938. It is safe to say however, that the magazine would not become the cultural force it became, were it not for the editorial tenure of Anatoli Sofronov, the noted Soviet poet and playwright. Under Sofronov’s at times controversial and at times bromidic leadership Ogonek became an important outlet for some of the most well-known and respected Soviet writers, visual artists, photographers and reporters. Although under Sofronov Ogonek grew steadily, it came to experience the peak of its popularity at the hands of its new editor Vitaly Korotich, who assumed the editorship of the magazine after the passing of Sofronov in 1986 at the height of Perestroika. Korotich, inspired by the newfound political liberties turned the journal into a lively space for edgy political commentary, criticism, and satire. After undergoing financial and creative crisis in the wake of the collapse of the Soviet Union, which saw a steep decline in readership, Ogonek has now rediscovered its creative zest under a new leadership and management, once again becoming an important forum for cultural and political intellectual exchanges.


Event: $1 BOOK SALE

Cal Day at UC Berkeley
Saturday, April 21
9am – 3pm
303 Doe LibraryThe 4,500+ books on the shelves of 303 Doe will be offered for $1 each.  Most books are fresh – that is, they have not been offered for sale before.  You will find some surprisingly attractive books in the room.  I hope that many move from the Library’s shelves to yours.

The Doe Library building will open at 9am on the day of the sale.  The best place to wait, if you plan to arrive in advance, is at the main (North) entrance to Doe.  Right at 9am I’ll walk up to room 303 with those who have been waiting in line.  I’ll ask that everyone maintains his or her place in the line.Scanners are permitted for those who require an electronic second opinion.  Hoarding books for subsequent leisurely review, however, is not.

Thank you for your interest, and we hope to see you there,
Dirk Kennedy

 
The Library
University of California, Berkeley

Primary Sources: The Guatemala Collection: Government and Church Documents for Sacatepéquez

picture of house, overlaid with The Guatemala CollectionThe Library has acquired the The Guatemala Collection: Government and Church Documents for Sacatepéquez (1587-1991).

Populated predominantly by indígenas (indigenous peoples) who speak Kaqchikel-Maya, Sacatepéquez Department offers an excellent window into Latin American and Native American history. Crucial to Guatemala’s colonial and national development, indígenas were largely discounted and denigrated. Despite such discrimination and disadvantages, many found ways to survive and thrive. Often converging at the nexus of modernization and tradition, the documents in this collection convey the complicated hybrid history of a nation striving to present itself as progressive and civilized in an Atlantic world that seldom associated those qualities with indigeneity. The Guatemala Collection houses a rich array of government, church, and civil documents that bear testimony to an indigenous population’s struggle and success with the changing social, economic, political, and religious dynamics of colonial and independent rule.

The Guatemala Collection comprises ten series. Across these ten series, the documents of the collection are organized into fifty-seven distinct classifications that include such themes as economy, agriculture, forced labor, complaints, crime, annual reports, natural disasters, municipal affairs, education, elections, military, public works, religion, public health, lands and estates, development, resignations and solicitations, regulations, festivities, and maps.

Language: Spanish

 


Primary Sources: Los Primeros Libros de las Americas

Logo for Primeros Libros de las Americas As the site explains, Los Primeros Libros de las Americas is “a digital collection of the first books printed in the Americas before 1601. These monographs are very important because they represent the first printing in the New World and provide primary sources for scholarly studies in a variety of academic fields. Of the 220 editions believed to have been produced in Mexico and 20 in Peru, approximately 155 are represented in institutions around the world.”