Workshop: Publish Digital Books & Open Educational Resources with Pressbooks

Digital Publishing Workshop Series

Publish Digital Books & Open Educational Resources with Pressbooks
Wednesday, September 26, 11:10am-12:30pm
Academic Innovation Studio, Dwinelle Hall 117 (Level D)

If you’re looking to self-publish work of any length and want an easy-to-use tool that offers a high degree of customization, allows flexibility with publishing formats (EPUB, MOBI, PDF), and provides web-hosting options, Pressbooks may be great for you. Pressbooks is often the tool of choice for academics creating digital books, open textbooks, and open educational resources, since you can license your materials for reuse however you desire. Learn why and how to use Pressbooks for publishing your original books or course materials. You’ll leave the workshop with a project already under way! Register at bit.ly/dp-berk

Upcoming Workshops in this Series 2018-2019:

  • The Long Haul: Best Practices for Making Your Digital Project Last
  • HTML/CSS Toolkit for Digital Projects

Please see bit.ly/dp-berk for details.



Workshop: Omeka, Scalar, WordPress, Oh My!

Digital Publishing Workshop Series

Omeka, Scalar, WordPress, Oh My!: Web Platforms for Digital Projects
Tuesday, September 25th, 3:40-5:00pm
D-Lab, 350 Barrows Hall

How do you go about publishing a digital book, a multimedia project, a digital exhibit, or another kind of digital project? In this workshop, we’ll take a look at use cases for common open-source web platforms like WordPress, Drupal, Omeka, and Scalar, and we’ll talk about hosting, storage, and asset management. There will be time for hands-on work in the platform most suited to your needs. No coding experience is necessary. Please bring a laptop if possible. Register at bit.ly/dp-berk

Upcoming Workshops in this Series:

  • Publish Digital Books & Open Educational Resources with Pressbooks
  • The Long Haul: Best Practices for Making Your Digital Project Last
  • HTML/CSS Toolkit for Digital Projects

Please see bit.ly/dp-berk for details.



New Instagram feed for Romance Language Collections


 UC Berkeley Romance Language Collections

The new Romance Language Collections Instagram feed brings forth little known and new resources and services in the UC Berkeley Library. Once you start following you’ll instantly receive early notices of new books, e-resources, exhibits, readings and more through your smartphone.


Community and RDM at CarpentryCon 2018

Between both organizations, Software Carpentry and Data Carpentry have more than two decades of experience teaching foundational computing and data science skills to researchers through their volunteer-led workshops. In 2018, these organizations merged to become the Carpentries, and at the end of May, Research Data Management team members and Carpentry instructors Scott Peterson, who is also the Head of the Morrison Library and Graduate Services Library, and Josh Quan, who is the Library’s Data Librarian, attended the first CarpentryCon at University College Dublin in Ireland.  This event brought together Carpentry members from across the globe to share knowledge, develop skills, and strategize about how to build strong local communities around teaching computational skills and good data practices that can have long lasting and far reaching effects for researchers. The theme of the conference was building locally and connecting globally, which were central to the keynotes, trainings, workshops, poster session, lightning talks, and meet-ups that featured views and ideas from all parts of the world.

CarpentryCon 2018 group

Photo by Berenice Batut

With a volunteer base coming from more than 60 member organizations spread out over 10 countries, community and diversity are what keep the Carpentries moving forward. Valerie Aurora’s opening keynote, Focus On Allies, set the tone for the inclusiveness of this conference by delineating ways to make sure everyone’s voice is not just heard, but listened to. Her guidelines for and approaches to confronting institutional inequity by empowering targets, those in the minority, and identifying allies, those with the social capital and sensitivity to influence change, produced examples of how to run better meetings where everyone has a voice, and how to engage with colleagues who refuse to see the need for change. By focusing on changing the culture of just “checking the box” on diversity and inclusion that can be found in tech companies and academia, Valerie’s keynote reminded everyone that the conference was  not just about improving how computing and data science can be taught, but on how they can be taught to everyone equally.

Greg Wilson, the founder of Software Carpentry, gave a keynote echoing some of Valerie’s concerns by pointing out that to change the system, you need to organize and fight, as “inertia is the fifth element of the the universe.” While Greg spoke about this challenge in starting Software Carpentry, his keynote was focused on endings and how the merger of the two carpentries signaled  it was now time to leave things in someone else’s hands. He gave the audience his ten simple rules for leaving, and noted that the English language doesn’t have a word that is the opposite of mistake. He reminded everyone that the most important part about the Carpentries was that it was teaching people how to teach, and in order to keep things fresh, change one thing every time you teach to make the instruction seem new.

Other highlights included  keynote presentations by Desmond Higgins and Anelda van der Walt. Desmond’s presentation on the history of the Clustal Package served as an example of what needs to be done to keep a project, program, or tool relevant over the long term. Andela van der Walt’s keynote, It Takes a Global Village, was an overview on the Carpentries in Africa. In order to provide a more complete view of such a large continent, after an introductory speech about the Carpentries Africa task force, Andela turned her keynote over to members of the task force to discuss their activities  in their respective African countries. Mesfin Diro, Lactatia Motsuku, Erika Mias, Katrin Tirok, Caroline F. Ajilogba, Kayleigh Lino, and Juan Steyn spoke about building vibrant R and Python communities in Ethiopia and South Africa, what is was like to be a part of the Africa Carpentries instructor community, how the task force is supporting instructors in Africa, the diversity of the disciplines, languages, and cultures of the learners taking Carpentry workshops in African countries, and how they have found funding to put on these workshops. The international reputation of the Carpenties was on full display through the many different voices in this keynote. These presentations brought the theme of building locally and connecting globally to the forefront, as the Carpentries Africa task force members demonstrated how they were able to connect their various communities across Africa in order for the Carpenties to have a greater impact globally. Both Anelda’s and Desmond’s keynotes exhibited how dedication, perseverance, and teamwork are necessary for sustainability across projects and organizations.

CarpentryCon 2018

Photo by Berenice Batut

Library Carpentry is the latest Carpentry to become involved with the Carpentries, and over the three days there were a few session that focused on teaching computing skills to librarians. A session on the incubation period of Library Carpentry outlined what is needed in creating a Carpentry. This backstory about Library Carpentry and what needs to be asked in order to create a set of successful workshops for another Carpentry community was nicely bookended two days later with a session on Library Carpentry onboarding that focused on what Library Carpentry needs to do going forward to make an even greater impact in training librarians across the world. A lightning talk on upskilling librarians in South Africa and a session on teaching the Carpentries in a university were also helpful in seeing how teaching Carpentry lessons for library staff at UC Berkeley might be done. Additionally, Josh Quan, UC Berkeley Data Librarian as well as RDM team member, presented a poster sharing the results of an undergraduate library fellowship program that integrated Carpentry teaching principles such as lesson design, cognitive load, and learner motivation into the curriculum. Sessions on FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable) data principles and an incubating HPC (High Performance Computing) Carpentry were also very useful in seeing how other places tackle issues relevant to RDM and Berkeley Research Computing at UC Berkeley.

The growth and impact the Carpentries are having across the world was demonstrated over the three days of CarpentryCon. This growth has created new challenges for the Carpentries though, and during the conference Tracy addressed the state of the Carpentries and the communication strategies being developed to deal with this growth. The new website, the Carpentries Handbook, and the Carpentry Clippings newsletter have been developed in the last year to help members find answers to questions they might have. There are also weekly discussion sessions that members can join to keep in touch with others in the Carpentries. Tracy stressed that training and community of practice are the Carpentries strength, and one can always reach out to it when you don’t know the answer. This is the power of a strong community, and this is something researchers working with data and technology need. CarpentryCon reinforced what a strong community can accomplish, and the ideas and practices at CarpentryCon can be used to strengthen the Carpentry and RDM communities that exists between the UC Berkeley Library, the Berkeley Institute for Data Science, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and the UC Berkeley campus as a whole.


Library Carpentry Sprint May 10th and 11th

The UC Berkeley Library is hosting the 2018 Library Carpentry Sprint on May 10th and 11th. This sprint it a part of the larger 2018 Mozilla Global Sprint, and will take place in the Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS), 190 Doe Library from 2-5pm on Thursday, May 10th and from 1-5pm on Friday, May 11th.  All are welcome and no experience with Library Carpentry or participating in a sprint is required. Come help us update the existing Library Carpentry curriculum or just come to see what Library Carpentry is all about. If you wish to sign up in advance, simply add you name to the Library Carpentry sprint etherpad under the UC Berkeley section. More information about Library Carpentry can be found here.

What

Library Carpentry Sprint is an international campaign that is a part of the larger Mozilla Global Sprint 2018. The goal of this Library Carpentry sprint is to improve/extend Library Carpentry lessons. Participants can contribute code or content, proofread writing, help with visual design and graphic art, do QA (quality assurance) on prototype tools, or advise or comment on project ideas or plans. All skill levels are welcome!

When

You can drop by anytime on May 10th from 2-5pm or May 11th from 1-5pm

Where

Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS), 190 Doe Memorial Library

Questions

Contact Scott Peterson, speterso@berkeley.edu


Workshop: The Long Haul: Best Practices for Making Your Digital Project Last

Digital Publishing Workshop Series

The Long Haul: Best Practices for Making Your Digital Project Last
Tuesday, May 1st, 4:10-5:00pm
Doe Library 303

You’ve invested a lot of work in creating a digital project, but how do you ensure it has staying power? We’ll look at choices you can make at the beginning of project development to influence sustainability, best practices for documentation and asset management, and how to sunset your project in a way that ensures long-term access for future researchers. Register at bit.ly/dp-berk

Please see bit.ly/dp-berk for details.


Follow Lit at the Library!
Subscribe by email
Twitter: @doe_lit
RSS

Workshop: By Design: Graphics & Images Basics

Digital Publishing Workshop Series

By Design: Graphics & Images Basics
Tuesday, April 17th, 4:10-5:00pm
D-Lab, 350 Barrows Hall

In this hands-on workshop, we will learn how to create web graphics for your digital publishing projects and websites. We will cover topics such as: image editing tools in Photoshop; image resolution for the web; sources for free public domain and Creative Commons images; and image upload to publishing tools such as WordPress. If possible, please bring a laptop with Photoshop installed. (All UCB faculty and students can receive a free Adobe Creative Suite license: https://software.berkeley.edu/adobe) Register at bit.ly/dp-berk

Upcoming Workshops in this Series 2017-2018:

  • The Long Haul: Best Practices for Making Your Digital Project Last

Please see bit.ly/dp-berk for details.


Follow Lit at the Library!
Subscribe by email
Twitter: @doe_lit
RSS

Workshop: Omeka for Digital Collections and Exhibits

Digital Publishing Workshop Series

Omeka for Digital Collections and Exhibits
Thursday, April 12th, 4:10-5:00pm
D-Lab, 350 Barrows Hall

Omeka is ideal for creating and displaying an online collection or exhibit composed of many digital items. If you have a bunch of digital images, scans, and files around a certain theme or project, and you would like to organize, describe, and showcase these files, Omeka may be a good fit for you. In this hands-on workshop, we will learn how to add and describe items in Omeka, the basics of the Dublin Core metadata schema, and how to create webpages with the Simple Pages plugin. Register at bit.ly/dp-berk

Upcoming Workshops in this Series 2017-2018:

  • By Design: Graphics & Images Basics
  • The Long Haul: Best Practices for Making Your Digital Project Last

Please see bit.ly/dp-berk for details.


Follow Lit at the Library!
Subscribe by email
Twitter: @doe_lit
RSS

DH Faire 2018 Comes to Berkeley

DH Faire 2018

The DH Faire is an annual Berkeley event that brings together digital humanists to share their work and reflect on the field more broadly. Including lectures, a poster session, and an evening reception, the Faire offers the Berkeley community the opportunity to share projects at various stages of development and receive invaluable feedback from peers.

Join us for the 2018 DH Faire, kicking off Monday, April 2nd!

Highlights:

DH Faire Reception and Poster Session
Mon. April 2, 5:00 – 7:00 PM | Morrison Library, 101 Doe
Help us kick off the 2018 DH Faire by enjoying refreshments with colleagues and browsing posters on recent DH work in Berkeley’s Morrison Library.

Digital Scholarship in the Library and Archives
Wed. April 4, 9:30 – 11:00 AM | Doe Library 180
The Library collaborates with digital humanities research and initiatives through digital publishing, digitization, preservation strategies, metadata creation, subject expertise, instruction, and much more. Come hear from librarians and archivists Mary Elings, Cody Hennesy, and Josh Quan on the ways they have engaged with digital scholarship both within the Library and on campus.

Keynote: David Bamman: The Long Rise of Word Vectors in the Digital Humanities
Wed. April 4, 4:00 -5:30 PM | Academic Innovation Studio (117 Dwinelle)
Professor David Bamman will outline the history of distributed representations of words and unpack what’s new about contemporary (neural) methods of learning such representations compared to previous approaches. By focusing on the fundamentals of representation learning, he will also discuss how we can incorporate other forms of extra-linguistic information into the representation for a word (such as time, geographical location, or author identity) and use that more complex representation for linguistic reasoning.

Full Schedule


UC ClioMetric History Project

UC ClioMetrics Project

UC ClioMetric History Project
Zach Bleemer, Project Director
Thursday, March 8
11:00-12:00
D-Lab (Barrows 371)

Zach Bleemer2018 is the sesquicentennial of the University of California. To celebrate this milestone, UC Berkeley’s Center for Studies in Higher Education has partnered with the UC Office of the President to create the UC ClioMetric History Project (uccliometric.org), a massive data repository documenting the university system’s history. The project encompasses interactive displays visualizing 150 years of UC’s students, faculty, courses, and budgets as well as research-ready collections of data now available for use.

This presentation is part of the DH Forum series sponsored by the DH Working Group. Refreshments will be served.